Laura Guidry-Grimes

Laura Guidry-Grimes
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences | UAMS · Medical Humanities and Bioethics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

46
Publications
1,868
Reads
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204
Citations

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
The concept of vulnerability is widely used in bioethics, particularly in research ethics and public health ethics. The traditional approach construes vulnerability as inherent in individuals or the groups to which they belong and views vulnerability as requiring special protections. Florencia Luna and other bioethicists continue to challenge tradi...
Chapter
At its core, nonideal theory is an attempt not only to address issues of justice, but it also provides us a lens through which we can articulate our limitations as knowers and reasoners, the ways in which we are relational in our autonomy needs, and the ways in which we are deeply dependent upon institutions and social supports for our agency and i...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to intense conversations about ventilator allocation and reallocation during a crisis standard of care. Multiple voices in the media and multiple state guidelines mention reallocation as a possibility. Drawing upon a range of neuroscientific, phenomenological, ethical, and socio-political considerations, we argue that...
Chapter
The consumer/survivor/ex-patient movement contends that individuals diagnosed with mental health conditions are routinely doubted or dismissed when they make claims about their needs, values, and interests. Too many therapists, the claim goes, take a parentalist stance toward their patients. Recent work on expertise shows how some patients can acqu...
Article
Shared decision making (SDM) is difficult to implement in mental health practice, but it remains an ethical ideal for motivating therapeutic capacity in patient-clinician relationships; this discrepancy warrants attention from clinical and ethical perspectives. This article explores what some clinicians see as obstacles to even attempting SDM with...
Article
Full-text available
In this essay, we suggest practical ways to shift the framing of crisis standards of care toward disability justice. We elaborate on the vision statement provided in the 2010 Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Medicine) “Summary of Guidance for Establishing Crisis Standards of Care for Use in Disaster Situations,” which emphasizes fairness;...
Article
The covert administration of medication occurs with incapacitated patients without their knowledge, involving some form of deliberate deception in disguising or hiding the medication. Covert medication in food is a relatively common practice globally, including in institutional and homecare contexts. Until recently, it has received little attention...
Article
Full-text available
There is an increasing number of clinical ethics consultants in hospitals around the world, which raises the question: Can anyone be an expert in giving moral advice? We contend that clinical ethics expertise is obtainable. We review three common challenges to the idea that clinical ethicists can be moral experts and show that each fails to undermi...
Article
Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness (2015) by Joseph J. Fins offers rich narratives of families and patients who experience disorders of consciousness in flawed health-care systems that are not clinically, structurally, financially, or ethically prepared to respond to the inherent complexities of these cond...
Article
Our aim in this article is to define the difficulties that clinical ethics services encounter when they are asked to demonstrate the value a clinical ethics service (CES) could and should have for an institution and those it serves. The topic emerged out of numerous related presentations at the Un-Conference hosted by the Cleveland Clinic in August...
Article
To the Editor The Research Letter¹ on state regulations regarding pregnant women who lack decisional capacity demonstrated variation of health legislation across states. Unfortunately, the analysis incorrectly characterized the state laws in Arkansas.
Article
Ask any clinical ethics consultant, and they can tell you about their transformative cases. Some stick with us because all roads led nowhere. Cassandra Lee had a history of pulling out lines and tubes and a distaste of warming blankets. Her admission marked her thirtieth over the past year. Many of the challenges facing the hospital caring for her...
Article
The question of whether a patient has insight is among the first to be considered in psychiatric contexts. There are several competing conceptions of clinical insight, which broadly refers to a patient’s awareness of their mental illness. When a patient is described as lacking insight, there are significant implications for patient care and to what...
Article
In response to Anne L. Dalle Ave and David M. Shaw, we agree with their general argument but emphasize a moral risk of HIV disclosure in deceased donation cases: the risk of relational rupture. Because of the importance that close relationships have to our sense of self and our life plans, this kind of rupture can have long-ranging implications for...
Article
Background: Caregivers and administrators in long-term facilities have fragile moral work in caring for residents with dementia. Residents are susceptible to barriers and vulnerabilities associated with the most intimate aspects of their lives, including how they express themselves sexually. The conditions for sexual agency are directly affected b...
Article
In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Jason Wasserman and Mark Navin argue that patients without decisional capacity can still have relatively stable wishes or inclinations toward one treatment option over another and that these preferences are “not devoid of moral weight and might therefore guide or at least influence treatment decisions wh...
Article
In an effort to address healthcare disparities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) populations, many hospitals and clinics institute diversity training meant to increase providers’ awareness of and sensitivity to this patient population. Despite these efforts, many healthcare spaces remain inhospitable to LGBTQ patients and th...
Article
The MedStar Washington Hospital Center clinical ethics team became involved in a case when the family requested the posthumous removal of a patient's ovaries for future reproductive use. This case presents a novel question for clinical ethicists, since the technology for posthumous female reproduction is still in development. In the bioethics liter...
Article
Although there has been significant attention in clinical ethics to when physicians should follow a parent's wishes, there has been much less discussion of the obligation to solicit viewpoints and decisions from all caregivers who have equal moral and legal standing in relation to a pediatric patient. How should healthcare professionals respond whe...
Article
There has been inadequate philosophical attention to the claims of psychiatric user/survivor activist groups, although these groups represent a significant social justice movement. Many of the core concerns and claims emerging from this activism can be found in disability activism. A first step that must be taken is to question how mental illnesses...
Article
We argue that we have obligations to future people that are similar in kind to obligations we have to current people. Modifying Michael Bratman’s account, we argue that as planning agents we must plan for the future to act practically in the present. Because our autonomy and selfhood are relational by nature, those plans will involve building affil...
Article
We argue that we have obligations to future people that are similar in kind to obligations we have to current people. Modifying Michael Bratman’s account, we argue that as planning agents we must plan for the future to act practically in the present. Because our autonomy and selfhood are relational by nature, those plans will involve building affil...
Article
How can social institutions complicate and worsen vulnerabilities of particular individuals or groups? We begin by explicating how certain diagnoses within mental health and medicine operate as interactive kinds of labels and how such labels can create institutional barriers that hinder one's capacity to achieve wellbeing. Interactive-kind modeling...
Article
Scientists, clinicians, and bioethicists are worried about how so-called personhood measures would limit access to certain types of contraception, research involving stem cells, and access to fertility treatments. While these measures have been struck down in Colorado, South Dakota, California, and Mississippi, the bill signed into law in Oklahoma...
Article
How can social institutions complicate and worsen vulnerabilities of particular individuals or groups? We begin by explicating how certain diagnoses within mental health and medicine operate as interactive kinds of labels and how such labels can create institutional barriers that hinder one's capacity to achieve wellbeing. Interactive-kind modeling...
Article
How can social institutions complicate and worsen vulnerabilities of particular individuals or groups? We begin by explicating how certain diagnoses within mental health and medicine operate as interactive kinds of labels and how such labels can create institutional barriers that hinder one’s capacity to achieve wellbeing. Interactive-kind modeling...

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