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Laura L. Figueroa

Laura L. Figueroa
Cornell University/UMass Amherst

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
1,361
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176
Citations
Introduction
Laura L. Figueroa currently works at the Department of Entomology, Cornell University. Laura currently researches disease transmission in plant-pollinator networks, through shared use of flowers.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Infectious diseases are a primary driver of bee decline worldwide, but limited understanding of how pathogens are transmitted hampers effective management. Flowers have been implicated as hubs of bee disease transmission, but we know little about how interspecific floral variation affects transmission dynamics. Using bumblebees ( Bombus impatiens),...
Article
Residential yards comprise the majority of green space in urban landscapes, yet are an understudied system because of access issues and because yards may be considered biologically depauperate. Yards are purposely created and managed and, hence, qualify as designer ecosystems, a term borrowed from restoration ecology. We investigated whether yard m...
Article
Bumble bees (Bombus Latreille) provide indispensable ecosystem services for natural and agricultural systems by increasing crop yield and quality. With documented bumble bee declines throughout the world, the need for baseline data on these important insects becomes apparent. The bumble bees of Oklahoma have previously not been surveyed, hampering...
Article
The plant trade provides a major mechanism for the long-distance dispersal of land snails, including slugs, which have low natural mobility. Whereas inspections at national borders intercept many in-coming snails, dispersal within countries is much less well regulated and documented. To investigate the role of plant nurseries as a source for the di...
Article
Full-text available
In the tropics, daily temperature fluctuations can pose physiological challenges for ectothermic organisms, and upper thermal limits may affect foraging activity over the course of the day. Variation in upper thermal limits can occur among and within species, and for social insects such as ants, within colonies. Within colonies, upper thermal limit...
Article
Full-text available
Floral nectar and pollen commonly contain diverse secondary metabolites. While these compounds are classically thought to play a role in plant defense, recent research indicates that they may also reduce disease in pollinators. Given that parasites have been implicated in ongoing bee declines, this discovery has spurred interest in the potential fo...
Article
Full-text available
When asked where to find bees, people often picture fields of wildflowers. While true for almost all species, there is a group of specialized bees, also known as the vulture bees, that instead can be found slicing chunks of meat from carcasses in tropical rainforests.
Article
• Pollination is essential to fruit production. How plant diversity and blooming events in and around orchards affect the pollinator community and the plant-flower-visitor network in neotropical systems remains largely unknown. • We surveyed the flower visitors in deciduous fruit trees and alternative blooming resources (other crops, hedgerows and...
Article
Full-text available
Reports of pollinator declines have prompted efforts to understand contributing factors and protect vulnerable species. While pathogens can be widespread in bee communities, less is known about factors shaping pathogen prevalence among species. Functional traits are often used to predict susceptibility to stressors, including pathogens, in other sp...
Article
Pathogens and lack of floral resources interactively impair global pollinator health. However, epidemiological and nutritional studies aimed at understanding bee declines have historically focused on social species, with limited evaluations of solitary bees. Here, we asked whether Crithidia bombi, a trypanosomatid gut pathogen known to infect bumbl...
Article
Full-text available
Species interaction networks, which play an important role in determining pathogen transmission and spread in ecological communities, can shift in response to agricultural landscape simplification. However, we know surprisingly little about how landscape simplification‐driven changes in network structure impact epidemiological patterns. Here, we co...

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