Laura Falkenberg

Laura Falkenberg
The Chinese University of Hong Kong | CUHK · School of Life Sciences

About

56
Publications
6,667
Reads
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863
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - present
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
February 2016 - February 2018
Norwegian Institute for Water Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2014 - January 2016
University College London
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Microplastics are ubiquitous in the marine environment, and their uptake by many organisms has been well documented. Concern about increasing plastic waste in ecosystems and organisms has led to the production of biodegradable alternatives. However, long breakdown times of biodegradable plastics in natural environments mean they still have the pote...
Article
Full-text available
Jellyfish have wide distributions throughout the world’s oceans, with new species records emerging from increasingly broad areas as novel identification approaches are implemented, including citizen science. Here, the first accounts of Thysanostoma loriferum (Ehrenberg, 1837) and Netrostoma setouchianum (Kishinouye, 1902) in Hong Kong waters are re...
Article
Solutions are being sought to ameliorate the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Seagrass may be a solution to provide refugia from climate change for marine organisms. This study aimed to determine if the seagrass Zostera muelleri sub spp. capricorni benefits the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata, and if these benefits can modify any an...
Article
Full-text available
The Hong Kong oyster Magallana hongkongensis, previously known as Crassostrea hongkongensis, is a true oyster species native to the estuarine-coast of the Pearl River Delta in southern China. The species—with scientific, ecological, cultural, and nutritional importance—has been farmed for hundreds of years. However, there is only limited informatio...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat-forming organisms have an important role in ameliorating stressful conditions and may be of particular relevance under a changing climate. Increasing CO2 emissions are driving a range of environmental changes, and one of the key concerns is the rapid acceleration of ocean acidification and associated reduction in pH. Such changes in seawate...
Article
Species-level differences in responses to environmental factors may increase a community’s ability to retain key functions under environmental change. We compared the oxygen consumption rates and maintenance of critical behaviors for three co-occurring intertidal gastropod species over a temperature range of 30 °C. Each species exhibited a distinct...
Article
The global recognition of the importance of science communication has led to a recent emphasis on outreach and broad dissemination of information as a core component of a scientist's role. Increasingly, training for academics is seen as a necessity for successful outreach activities, yet it has associated costs which may deter some from participati...
Article
Full-text available
Peer‐review and subject‐matter editing is the backbone of scientific publishing. However, early‐career researchers (ECRs) are given few opportunities to participate in the editorial process beyond reviewing articles. Thus, a disconnect exists: science needs high‐quality editorial talent to conduct, oversee and improve the publishing process, yet we...
Article
Full-text available
Short‐term, sublethal response variables are increasingly used to provide rapid indications of whole organism responses to future climate conditions. Accumulating evidence suggests, however, that these response variables may not consistently reflect whole organism responses which manifest over longer time scales. Here, we consider the effect of mod...
Preprint
Full-text available
Peer-review and subject-matter editing is the backbone of scientific publishing. However, early career researchers (ECRs) are given few opportunities to participate in the editorial process beyond reviewing articles. Thus, a disconnect exists: science needs high-quality editorial talent to conduct, oversee, and improve the publishing process, yet w...
Article
Full-text available
Biological fitness relies on processes acting at various levels of organization, all of which can be modified by environmental change. Application of synthesis frameworks, such as the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP), can enhance our understanding of the responses to stressors identified in studies at each level, as well as the links among them. Howev...
Article
Full-text available
The ocean provides resources key to human health and well-being, including food, oxygen, livelihoods, blue spaces, and medicines. The global threat to these resources posed by accelerating ocean acidification is becoming increasingly evident as the world’s oceans absorb carbon dioxide emissions. While ocean acidification was initially perceived as...
Article
Editors are often described as gatekeepers of scientific publishing, as they are responsible for maintaining journal standards, deciding what is published, and ultimately guiding discourse. Scientists who are journal editors gain career benefits, yet these are rarely described to early career researchers, much less how to prepare for such a role. A...
Chapter
Ocean acidification (OA) is the decline in seawater pH and saturation levels of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals that has led to concerns for calcifying organisms such as corals, oysters and mussels because of the adverse effects of OA on their biomineralisation, shells and skeletons. A range of cellular biology, geochemistry and materials scienc...
Article
Full-text available
Species’ responses to climate change will reflect variability in the effects of physiological selection that future conditions impose. Here, we considered the effects of ocean acidification (increases in pCO2; 606, 925, 1250 µatm) and freshening (reductions in salinity; 33, 23, 13 PSU) on sperm motility in oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from two popul...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding links between the abiotic environment and organism fitness and function is a central challenge of biology, and an issue of growing relevance due to anthropogenic environmental changes. To date, our understanding of these links has largely been based on the findings of isolated experimental studies. This command may, however, be enhanc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Urchin harvesting and kelp regrowth in northern Norway under ocean acidification and warming.
Chapter
Conclusions, knowledge gaps and recommendations. In: AMAP Assessment 2018: Arctic Ocean Acidification
Article
Publication is the key means by which science is disseminated, with evaluation by journal editors and peer reviewers an important component of the scientific process. Peer reviews are, however, a typically occluded genre of documents not publicly available. Consequently, relatively little is known about peer reviews, including what makes them relev...
Article
en Although the public desire for healthy environments is clear‐cut, the science and management of ecosystem health has not been as simple. Ecological systems can be dynamic and can shift abruptly from one ecosystem state to another. Such unpredictable shifts result when ecological thresholds are crossed; that is, small cumulative increases in an e...
Article
Full-text available
Hard surfaces submerged in the marine environment often become colonised by macro-organisms unless the surfaces have some form of biofouling protection. While protective paints that contain tributyltin or copper work well to prevent biofouling, release of these materials into the environment has been shown to have wider negative impacts. Consequent...
Article
Human societies derive economic benefit from marine systems, yet these benefits may be modified as humans drive environmental change. Here, we conducted the first systematic review of literature on the potential economic effects of ocean acidification. We identified that while there is a growing literature discussing this topic, assessments of the...
Article
Full-text available
Forecasting the ecological consequences of a changing climate requires a range of approaches, including the use of mesocosms in which multiple physical and chemical parameters can be manipulated and the response of interacting organisms quantified. Here, we describe the design and evaluate the performance of a facility incorporating large mesocosms...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The ecological consequences of climate change will be driven by a combination of both gradual and abrupt changes in climatic conditions. Despite growing evidence that abrupt abiotic change of extreme events may profoundly alter ecological processes, it remains unclear how such events may combine with longer-term global and local disturb...
Article
Full-text available
Current trends in habitat loss have been forecast to accelerate under anticipated global change, thereby focusing conservation attention on identifying the circumstances under which key species interactions retard habitat loss. Urbanised coastlines are associated with broad-scale loss of kelp canopies and their replacement by less productive mats o...
Article
Full-text available
Seawater desalination is an increasingly common means to meet the demand for freshwater. Resulting wastewater discharges can, however, impact biota of the surrounding environment. Concern exists that interactive effects specific to the outputs of each desalination plant may result in unique impacts difficult to predict by studying existing plants o...
Article
Water quality monitoring programmes have become integral components of efforts to identify the impact(s) of anthropogenic activities. In many programmes, however, it appears records are being collected at finer temporal scales than required to produce the information needed by end-users (e.g. managers). Such mismatches are of concern given that the...
Article
Full-text available
Certain environmental conditions facilitate the control of primary producers by herbivores. Environmental change can, therefore, mediate the strength of consumption relative to production such that the abundance of primary producers is altered, potentially driving phase-shifts from one habitat type to another (e.g. the displacement kelp forests by...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in rates of herbivory may be driven by direct effects of the abiotic environment on grazers, as well as indirect effects mediated by their food. Disentangling these direct and indirect effects is of fundamental importance for ecological forecasts of changing climate on species interactions and their influence on biogenic habitat. Whilst e...
Article
Full-text available
Primary producers rarely exist under their ideal conditions, with key processes often limited by resource availability. As human activities modify environmental conditions, and therefore resource availability, some species may be released from these limitations while others are not, potentially disrupting community structure. In order to examine th...
Article
1. Synergies among stressors drive unanticipated changes to alternative states, yet little has been done to assess whether alleviating one or more contributing stressors may disrupt these interactions. It would be particularly useful to understand whether the synergistic effects of global and local stressors could be alleviated, leading to slower c...
Chapter
In all ecosystems, including near shore marine environments, resource availability regulates the productivity of individuals, species, and, ultimately, communities. Where human activities enrich limiting resources in these systems, rates of primary production and accumulation of organic matter are modified, a process widely referred to as eutrophic...
Article
Full-text available
Foundation species, such as kelp, exert disproportionately strong community effects and persist, in part, by dominating taxa that inhibit their regeneration. Human activities which benefit their competitors, however, may reduce stability of communities, increasing the probability of phase-shifts. We tested whether a foundation species (kelp) would...
Data
ANOVA testing the combined effect of Kelp (present v. absent), Nutrients (ambient v. elevated) and CO2 (current v. future) on the change in percentage covers of turf-forming algae. (TIF)
Data
Physicochemical parameters of mesocosms measured in the field (n = 9) and the laboratory (n = 3) for each treatment. Reported are means, standard errors (S.E.), maximum and minimum values. Field ammonia, phosphate and NOX were sampled weekly on six occasions, with laboratory-based mesocosms sampled on alternate days (n = 20 occasions). Total Alkali...
Data
Results from ANOVA, testing the combined effect of Kelp (present v. absent), Nutrients (ambient v. elevated) and CO2 (current v. future) on the 9 physicochemical parameters measured in the field and effect of Nutrients (ambient v. elevated) on the 3 measured in the laboratory. Field ammonia, phosphate and NOX were sampled weekly on six occasions, w...
Data
Nutrient concentrations within field (a, c, e) and laboratory (b, d, f) based mesocosms measured from beginning to end of the experiment. Ammonia (a, b), phosphate (c, d) and NOX (e, f ) under ambient nutrients (filled circles) and elevated nutrients (empty circles). Data presented are means across CO2 and kelp treatments. Note the different scales...
Data
ANOVA testing the combined effect of Kelp (present v. absent), Nutrients (ambient v. elevated) and CO2 (current v. future) on the final percentage covers of turf-forming algae. (TIF)
Data
Carbonate chemistry parameters in field-based experimental mesocosms measured weekly from beginning to end of the experiment. pH (a), TA (b), pCO2 (c), HCO3− (d) in mesocosms under current CO2 (filled circles) and future CO2 (empty circles). Total Alkalinity (TA) and pH were measured weekly on eight occasions, from which concentrations (µmol kg−1)...
Data
ANOVA testing the combined effect of Kelp (present v. absent), Nutrients (ambient v. elevated) and CO2 (current v. future) on the final weight per area of turf-forming algae. (TIF)
Data
A representative diurnal cycle (Oct 9–10, 2009; 0630-0630) of pH for all treatment combinations. CCO2, current CO2; FCO2, future CO2; KP, kelp present; KA, kelp absent; AN, ambient nutrients; EN, elevated nutrients. (TIF)
Article
Full-text available
Accumulation of atmospheric CO2 is increasing the temperature and concentration of CO2 in near-shore marine systems. These changes are occurring concurrently with increasing alterations to local conditions, including nutrient pollution and exploitation of selected biota. While the body of evidence for the negative effects of climate change is rapid...
Article
Climate-driven change represents the cumulative effect of global through local-scale conditions, and understanding their manifestation at local scales can empower local management. Change in the dominance of habitats is often the product of local nutrient pollution that occurs at relatively local scales (i.e. catchment scale), a critical scale of m...
Data
Climate-driven change represents the cumulative effect of global through local-scale conditions, and understanding their manifestation at local scales can empower local management. Change in the dominance of habitats is often the product of local nutrient pollution that occurs at relatively local scales (i.e. catchment scale), a critical scale of m...

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