Laura Dugué

Laura Dugué
Université de Paris · CNRS Integrative Neuroscience and Cognition Center (INCC)

PhD

About

38
Publications
4,403
Reads
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832
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
Université de Paris
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
May 2015 - July 2015
New York University
Position
  • Part-time teacher/researcher for the Research+ program
January 2014 - July 2016
New York University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2010 - June 2013
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Field of study
  • Neurosciences, Behavior and Cognition
September 2008 - September 2010
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Field of study
  • Cognitive Neurosciences
September 2005 - September 2008

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Do humans perceive the world through discrete sampling of the sensory environment? Although it contrasts starkly with the intuition of a continuous perceptual flow, this idea dates back decades when brain rhythms were first suggested to work as periodic shutters. These would gate bouts of information into conscious perception and affect behavioural...
Preprint
Visual perception waxes and wanes periodically as a function of the phase of low-frequency brain oscillations (theta, 4-7 Hz; alpha, 8-13 Hz) [1-9]. Perceptual cycles are defined as the corresponding periodic modulation of perceptual performance (review [10, 11]). Here, using psychophysics, we tested the hypothesis that brain oscillations travel ac...
Article
Full-text available
Attention has been found to sample visual information periodically, in a wide range of frequencies below 20 Hz. This periodicity may be supported by brain oscillations at corresponding frequencies. We propose that part of the discrepancy in periodic frequencies observed in the literature is due to differences in attentional demands, resulting from...
Article
Spontaneous α oscillations (∼10 Hz) have been associated with various cognitive functions, including perception. Their phase and amplitude independently predict cortical excitability and subsequent perceptual performance. However, the causal role of α phase-amplitude tradeoffs on visual perception remains ill-defined. We aimed to fill this gap and...
Article
Full-text available
Sampling of information is thought to be an important aspect of explorative behavior. Evidence for it has been gained in behavioral assessments of a variety of overt and covert cognitive domains, including sensation, attention, memory, eye movements and dexterity. A common aspect across many findings is that sampling tends to exhibit a rhythmicity...
Preprint
Full-text available
Attention has been found to sample visual information periodically, in a wide range of frequencies below 20 Hz. This periodicity may be supported by brain oscillations at corresponding frequencies. We propose that part of the discrepancy in periodic frequencies observed in the literature is due to differences in attentional demands, resulting from...
Article
Full-text available
Parieto-occipital alpha rhythms (8–12 Hz) underlie cortical excitability and influence visual performance. Whether the synchrony of intrinsic alpha rhythms in the occipital cortex can be entrained by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an open question. We applied 4-pulse, 10-Hz rhythmic TMS to entrain intrinsic alpha oscillators targeting r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parieto-occipital alpha rhythms (8–12 Hz) underlie cortical excitability and influence visual performance. Whether the synchrony of intrinsic alpha rhythms in the occipital cortex can be entrained by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an open question. We applied 4-pulse, 10-Hz rhythmic TMS to entrain intrinsic alpha oscillators targeting r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Spontaneous alpha oscillations (∼10Hz) have been associated with various cognitive functions, including perception. Their phase and amplitude independently predict cortical excitability and subsequent perceptual performance. Yet, the causal role of alpha phase-amplitude tradeoffs on visual perception remains ill-defined. We aimed to fill this gap a...
Article
Full-text available
Accumulating evidence suggests that visual perception operates in an oscillatory fashion at an alpha frequency (around 10 Hz). Moreover, visual attention also seems to operate rhythmically, albeit at a theta frequency (around 5 Hz). Both rhythms are often associated to "perceptual snapshots" taken at the favorable phases of these rhythms. However,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Parieto-occipital alpha rhythms (8-12 Hz) have been shown to underlie cortical excitability and influence visual performance. However, how the occipital cortex responds to an externally imposed alpha rhythm via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an open question. Hypotheses: 10-Hz rhythmic TMS can entrain intrinsic alpha oscilla...
Article
Full-text available
How do endogenous (voluntary) and exogenous (involuntary) attention modulate activity in visual cortex? Using ROI-based fMRI analysis, we measured fMRI activity for valid and invalid trials (target at cued/un-cued location, respectively), pre- or post-cueing endogenous or exogenous attention, while participants performed the same orientation discri...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accumulating evidence suggests that visual perception operates in an oscillatory fashion at an alpha frequency (around 10 Hz). Moreover, visual attention also seems to operate rhythmically, albeit at a theta frequency (around 5 Hz). Both rhythms are often associated to “perceptual snapshots” taken at the favorable phases of these rhythms. However,...
Article
Our senses – vision, audition, touch, taste and smell – constantly receive a large amount of information. This information is processed and used in order to guide our actions. Cognitive sciences consist in studying mental abilities through different disciplines, e.g. linguistic, neuropsychology, neuroscience or modelling. Each discipline considers...
Article
Full-text available
Voluntary attention is at the core of a wide variety of cognitive functions. Attention can be oriented to and sustained at a location or reoriented in space to allow processing at other locations-critical in an ever-changing environment. Numerous studies have investigated attentional orienting in time and space, but little is known about the spatio...
Article
Visual search, looking for a target embedded among distractors, has long been used to study attention. Current theories postulate a two-stage process in which early visual areas perform feature extraction, whereas higher-order regions perform attentional selection. Such a model implies iterative communication between low- and high-level regions to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Voluntary attention is at the core of cognitive functions. Attention can be sustained at a location, or reoriented in space to allow processing at other locations, critical in an ever-changing environment. Numerous studies have investigated attentional orienting in time and space but little is known about the spatio-temporal dynamics of attentional...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is considered that endogenous (voluntary) attention acts via top-down, and exogenous (involuntary) attention via bottom-up mechanisms, and that both affect visual areas similarly. Using an fMRI ROI-based analysis for occipital areas, we measured average fMRI activity for valid (target at cued location) and invalid (target at un-cued location) tr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Visual search, looking for a target embedded among distractors, has long been used to study attention. Current theories postulate a two-stage process in which early visual areas perform feature extraction, while higher-order regions perform attentional selection. Such a model implies iterative communication between low- and high-level regions to se...
Article
The temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) has been associated with various cognitive and social functions, and is critical for attentional reorienting. Attention affects early visual processing. Neuroimaging studies dealing with such processes have thus far concentrated on striate and extrastriate areas. Here, we investigated whether attention orienting...
Article
Full-text available
Feature and conjunction searches are widely used to study attentional deployment. However, the spatiotemporal behavior of attention integration in these tasks remains under debate. Are multiple search stimuli processed in parallel or sequentially? Does sampling of visual information and attentional deployment differ between these two types of searc...
Article
Full-text available
Oscillatory brain activity has functional relevance for perceptual and cognitive processes, as proven by numerous electrophysiology studies accumulating over the years. However, only within the past two decades have researchers been able to study the causal role of such oscillations using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technology. Two comp...
Article
Full-text available
Reorienting of voluntary attention enables the processing of stimuli at previously unattended locations. Although studies have identified a ventral fronto-parietal network underlying attention [1 and 2], little is known about whether and how early visual areas are involved in involuntary [3 and 4] and even less in voluntary [5] reorienting, and the...
Article
Full-text available
Difficult search tasks are known to involve attentional resources, but the spatiotemporal behavior of attention remains unknown. Are multiple search targets processed in sequence or in parallel? We developed an innovative methodology to solve this notoriously difficult problem. Observers performed a difficult search task during which two probes wer...
Article
Full-text available
Visual search-finding a target element among similar-looking distractors-is one of the prevailing experimental methods to study attention. Current theories of visual search postulate an early stage of feature extraction interacting with an attentional process that selects candidate targets for further analysis; in difficult search situations, this...
Article
Difficult search tasks are known to involve attentional resources, but the spatio-temporal behavior of attention remains unknown. Are multiple search targets processed in sequence or in parallel? We developed a new methodology (based on (Dubois, Hamker and VanRullen, 2009, J. Vis. 9(5):3, 1-11)) to solve this notoriously difficult problem. Subjects...
Article
Full-text available
Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal...
Article
Full-text available
What are the temporal dynamics of perceptual sampling during visual search tasks, and how do they differ between a difficult (or inefficient) and an easy (or efficient) task? Does attention focus intermittently on the stimuli, or are the stimuli processed continuously over time? We addressed these questions by way of a new paradigm using periodic f...
Article
Visual search tasks have been used to understand how, where and when attention influences visual processing. Current theories suggest the involvement of a high-level ''saliency map'' that selects a candidate location to focus attentional resources. For a parallel (or ''pop-out'') task, the first chosen location is systematically the target, but for...
Article
Full-text available
Why does neuronal activity in sensory brain areas sometimes give rise to perception, and sometimes not? Although neuronal noise is often invoked as the key factor, a portion of this variability could also be due to the history and current state of the brain affecting cortical excitability. Here we directly test this idea by examining whether the ph...
Article
Full-text available
Visual search tasks have been used to understand how, where and when attention influences visual processing. Current theories suggest the involvement of a high-level "saliency map" that selects a candidate location to focus attentional resources. For a parallel (or "pop-out") task, the first chosen location is systematically the target, but for a s...

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Projects (2)
Project
A collection of works that critically revisit the evidence for the role of brain rhythms in perception and cognition. Submission closed. Find here a collection of all articles that have been published in the Special Issue so far (see References).
Project
Research Internship Université Paris Descartes - Région de Paris, France LPP - Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception Attention Rhythms : study using TMS and EEG Do we experience the world continuously or as a series of discrete events, like the frames of a film reel ? Previous experiments have shown that visual information can be sampled periodically by attention, this process being supported by oscillations recorded in the EEG brain activity. Using psychophysics and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) combined with EEG, the aim of this internship is to assess whether there is a causal link between spontaneous brain oscillations and visual attention in human.