Laura J. Crossey

Laura J. Crossey
University of New Mexico | UNM · Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences

PhD University of Wyoming.

About

233
Publications
35,354
Reads
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5,160
Citations
Introduction
My research is in the area of Aqueous and Sedimentary Geochemistry. I use tools such as elemental analysis, stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry, and gas chemistry to address problems in hydrochemistry, diagenesis, geomicrobiology, and geothermal processes. I collaborate with microbiologists to integrate molecular genetics into our geological picture of aqueous environments. I collaborate with geologists and geophysicists to provide a context for my investigations. I engage in geoscience and STEM outreach to the public, as well as run programs to increase participation by underrepresented groups.
Additional affiliations
June 2017 - August 2018
University of New Mexico
Position
  • Head of Faculty
Description
  • Responsible for research support and infrastructure in a diverse college at a research-intensive university.
August 2013 - July 2016
University of New Mexico
Position
  • Department Chair
August 1986 - present
University of New Mexico
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Education
August 1980 - May 1985
University of Wyoming
Field of study
  • Geology
August 1977 - May 1979
August 1973 - June 1977
Colorado College
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (233)
Article
Full-text available
The Surprise Valley landslide complex is the name used here for a group of prominent river-damming landslides in Grand Canyon (Arizona, USA) that has shifted the path of the Colorado River several times in the past 2 m.y. We document a sequence of eight landslides. Three are Toreva-block landslides containing back-rotated but only mildly disrupted...
Article
Sanidine dating and magnetostratigraphy constrain the timing of integration of the lower Colorado River (southwestern United States and northern Mexico) with the evolving Gulf of California. The Colorado River arrived at Cottonwood Valley (Nevada and Arizona) after 5.24 Ma (during or after the Thvera subchron). The river reached the proto–Gulf of C...
Article
Full-text available
The provocative hypothesis that the Shinumo Sandstone in the depths of Grand Canyon was the source for clasts of orthoquartzite in conglomerate of the Sespe Formation of coastal California, if verified, would indicate that a major river system flowed southwest from the Colorado Plateau to the Pacific Ocean prior to opening of the Gulf of California...
Article
We applied tandem U-Pb dating of detrital zircon (DZ) to redefine the Tonto Group in the Grand Canyon region (Arizona, USA) and to modify the Cambrian time scale. Maximum depositional ages (MDAs) based upon youngest isotope-dilution DZ ages for the Tapeats Sandstone are ≤508.19 ± 0.39 Ma in eastern Grand Canyon, ≤507.68 ± 0.36 Ma in Nevada, and ≤50...
Article
Trilobites appeared and diversified rapidly in the Cambrian, but it is debated as to whether their radiations and extinctions were globally synchronous or geographically restricted and diachronous. The end of the early Cambrian is a classic example—it has traditionally been defined by the extinction of olenellid and redlichiid trilobites and the ap...
Article
Located on the southeastern part of the Colorado Plateau, the Zuni Mountains are home to the endangered Zuni Bluehead Sucker (ZBS) (Catostomus discobolus yarrowi). A 4-year study was conducted on a low-flow (<80 cm3/s) hillslope spring and intermittent stream, that are home to one of the three remaining ZBS populations. Seasonal measurements of phy...
Article
Full-text available
In streams, gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) (i.e., stream metabolism) control the transport and fate of nutrients and organic carbon and vice versa. The importance of short-term and local factors in driving these processes is well known in the literature. However, little information exists regarding the extent of tempo...
Article
Dalhousie Springs is the largest spring complex in the western Great Artesian Basin (GAB), Australia. Aridland springs like Dalhousie provide the only aquatic habitats in regions lacking surface water and are globally threatened by unsustainable groundwater development. Groundwater use in the more densely populated eastern GAB historically was high...
Article
The western Great Artesian Basin (GAB) is an important water source for pastoral and town water supplies, as well as for springs containing endemic flora and fauna, within arid Australia. This study focuses on the hydrochemical variations of groundwater and spring discharge in order to determine the major geochemical processes responsible for water...
Article
The relationship between fault structures and Great Artesian Basin (GAB) spring occurrence has rarely been discussed in relation to intra-plate seismicity. This is despite the occurrence of mound springs in the southwest portion of the GAB in South Australia being previously linked with the occurrence of faulting and the many studies concerning the...
Article
Full-text available
In the fifth sentence of the Abstract (p. 111), “basalt” should instead be “basal.” The sentence should be “Bouse Formation basal carbonate locally exhibits outcrop-scale (tens of meters) syndepositional dips of 30°–90°, draped over and encrusted upon paleotopography, and has a basin-wide vertical distribution of as much as 500 m.”
Article
Full-text available
Structural evidence presented here documents that deformation was ongoing within the lower Colorado River corridor (southwestern USA) during and after the latest Miocene Epoch, postdating large-magnitude extension and metamorphic core complex formation. Geometric and kinematic data collected on faults in key geologic units constrain the timing of d...
Article
The year 2019 is the 150th anniversary of John Wesley Powell’s epic exploration of the Colorado River through Grand Canyon and the 100th anniversary of the establishment of Grand Canyon National Park. This is an excellent moment to look back 150 years to think about where we have come from as a science and society, and look forward 100 years toward...
Article
Full-text available
Neogene deposits of the lower Colorado River valley, especially the Miocene(?) and early Pliocene Bouse Formation, have been the focus of intense debate regarding the early paleoenvironmental history of this important continental-scale river system in southwestern North America and its integration with the proto-Gulf of California. Fine-grained uni...
Article
Warm and hot springs occur within and on both sides of the Rio Grande rift (RGR) of northern New Mexico. Springs on the western side of the RGR are along the Ojo Caliente fault zone, which intersects the Embudo fault transfer zone that extends northeast of the Valles Caldera. Springs on the eastern side occur along north-south rift-bounding faults...
Article
Full-text available
Chronological and geochemical data from scarp and scarp-foot depression sediments (SSDS) have been used for deciphering Saharan paleoclimates and patterns of migration of anatomically modern humans (AMH). U-Th dating of thick accumulations of SSDS indicates prevalent deposition during long-lasting cool glacial periods (marine isotope stage [MIS] 6,...
Article
We examine a series of carbonic warm and hot springs in northern New Mexico, USA: 1) Tierra Amarilla springs 2) Penasco Springs and 3) Soda Dam, Jemez and Indian hot springs. Spring geochemistry is compared to waters from the Valles Caldera geothermal system and to groundwater in nearby sedimentary aquifers. Multiple hydrochemical tracers are appli...
Article
Full-text available
A recent study posits that much of the 240-m-deep inner gorge of Grand Canyon was carved between 500 and 400 ka via passage of a migrating knickzone with incision rates of ~1600 m/Ma during that time period; this was based on dating of a ca. 500 ka travertine deposit perched on the rim of the inner gorge, near Hermit Rapid, and a ca. 400 ka travert...
Article
Full-text available
The Sauk transgression was one of the most dramatic global marine transgressions in Earth history. It is recorded by deposition of predominantly Cambrian non-marine to shallow marine sheet sandstones unconformably above basement rocks far into the interiors of many continents. Here we use dating of detrital zircons sampled from above and below the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The ~6­-4.8 Ma Bouse Formation records the first arrival and subsequent integration of the Colorado River to the Gulf of California. Some “non-­tectonic” models for the deposition and distribution of Bouse carbonate deposits suggest that modern outcrop elevations reflect original depositional highstand lake levels. Here, we report data in support o...
Article
Full-text available
The combination of hydrochemistry with other environmental tracers such as noble gases and uranium series dating of travertine deposits are providing new insights into the hydrogeology of the western margin of the GAB. Previous conceptual models of simple geology and geochemical evolution along flow paths have been re-examined. Our results show tha...
Article
Travertine deposits precipitated by groundwater discharging from the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) are widespread in central Australia and have the potential to provide a record of palaeohydrogeology and palaeoclimate. The GAB is one of the largest artesian basins in the world and a relationship between travertine deposits and recharge sites has poten...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Deposits of the ~6 to 4.8 Ma Bouse Formation and the earliest Colorado River Bullhead alluvium (~4.5 Ma) occur at variable elevations along the length of the lower Colorado River corridor. Well data indicate that the deepest and thickest Bouse deposits occur in the subsurface of successive basins, while patchy eroded remnants extend to between 330...
Article
Late Mesoproterozoic sedimentary sequences in southwest Laurentia range in age from 1340 to 1035 Ma and record regionally extensive intracratonic sedimentation before and during the Grenville Orogeny in southern Laurentia. This paper examines the specific links between intracratonic sedimentation and orogenesis and develops a new tectonic model for...
Article
The upper Tonian Chuar, Uinta Mountain, and middle Pahrump (ChUMP) groups of present-day western Laurentia collectively record the early breakup of Rodinia, largescale perturbations in the carbon cycle, and eukaryotic evolution, all of which preceded the onset of global glaciation by tens of millions of years. The spectacularly preserved and shale-...
Article
Full-text available
This paper documents a multi-stage incision and denudation history for the Little Colorado River (LCR) region of the southwestern Colorado Plateau over the past 70 Ma. The first two pulses of denudation are documented by thermochronologic data. Differential Laramide cooling of samples on the ­Mogollon Rim suggests carving of 70–30 Ma paleotopograph...