Laura Cleton

Laura Cleton
Maastricht University | UM · UNU-MERIT

PhD researcher in Political Science

About

17
Publications
582
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
30
Citations
Introduction
Laura Cleton is a researcher in return migration & development at UNU-MERIT and finishing her PhD on the legitimation of undocumented children's deportation at the University of Antwerp. Prior to starting her PhD, she worked as a junior lecturer (University of Amsterdam) and junior researcher (Utrecht University). Her research interests include migration governance, migration policies & politics, voluntary and forced return migration, feminist approaches to migration studies and family migration
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
University of Antwerp
Position
  • PhD Student
May 2018 - October 2018
Utrecht University
Position
  • Researcher
August 2017 - October 2018
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Junior Teacher
Education
September 2015 - July 2017
University of Amsterdam
Field of study
  • Social Sciences
September 2012 - June 2015
Radboud University
Field of study
  • Cultural Anthropology & Development Studies

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
How do states relate to undocumented immigrants and asylum seekers once they have been formally rejected? A growing amount of research has been devoted to the role of government and NGO workers in executing soft-deportation policy through 'voluntary return' programmes. Many of these studies convincingly argue that voluntary return most often is any...
Article
Full-text available
European governments widely celebrate and extensively fund ‘assisted voluntary return’ (AVR) programmes and assume that return counsellors play an important role for their implementation. At the same time, relevant legislation only vaguely defines this role and reduces it to a passive and neutral provision of ‘objective information’. In this articl...
Article
In Belgium and the Netherlands, the detention and deportation of illegalised migrant families with underage children has recently caused public controversy, resulting in the eruption of anti-deportation protests. This controversy is rooted in the unresolved tension for liberal states to protect children’s rights on the one hand, while limiting ‘unw...
Article
This article analyzes the ways in which the Belgian and Dutch governments legitimize the deportation of unaccompanied minors, by focusing on the interplay of intersectional boundary work and bordering practices. Building on the work of postcolonial feminists and scholars studying the role of identity and cultural values in migration policy, the art...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter presents an overview of feminist scholarship on the politics of international migration by Europe-based scholars, explaining that feminist IR scholarship makes up a small and recent part of a wider, rich tradition of feminist migration studies. It shows how feminist IR scholarship on migration focuses on familiar IR themes (security an...
Article
This article examines the use of time as a technology of migration control for the deportation of non-citizen children in Belgium and the Netherlands. The scarce literature on the ‘time politics’ of migration enforcement shows that states are under increasing pressure to speed up deportations, especially for non-citizens convicted of criminal offen...
Chapter
All nation-states across the globe acknowledge family ties as a ground for the admission of foreigners and in the OECD, family migration is the largest migration category by far. Therefore, the question which relationships qualify as ‘family’ in migration policy is key to defining who gets to migrate legally. These conceptions of who and what count...
Preprint
Full-text available
Book Review for Border Criminologies, access here: https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2020/09/book-review
Preprint
Full-text available
Book review: Deporting Black Britons. Portraits of deportation to Jamaica by Luke de Noronha, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2020, v+307pp., £16.99 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-5261-4399-0.
Article
‘Going along’ with caseworkers? About negotiating boundaries between participating in and observing undocumented migrants’ return trajectories in the Netherlands This paper deals with reflections on conducting participant observation among a group of migration officials in the Netherlands who are in charge of ensuring the voluntary and forced depar...
Research
Full-text available
In this paper, we investigate how state and non-state provides of return counselling try to influence aspirations for return among (rejected) asylum seekers. Existing literature has highlighted both the importance and malleability of migration aspirations in a wide range of migratory trajectories. Yet, it paid little attention to the situation of p...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The aim of this project is to explore the various ways in which European governments - specifically the Dutch and Belgian ones - legitimize their use of coercive, exclusionary measures geared at illegalized migrant children. It does so by centering the interplay between bordering (here primarily understood as deportation) and boundary work (discursive divisions between "us" and "them"). It is among the first to deploy feminist intersectional theory to unravel the differentiated power relations that produce the subjectivities of illegalized children, and render them "deportable". It relies on a critical, Foucauldian epistemology and works with interview data and a critical frame analysis of various documents, including policy proposals, parliamentary debates and NGO guidelines. The project will provide a deeper understanding in the exercise of coercive control in the face of contestation and controversy over the situation of illegalized migrant children, and shows the usefulness of intersectional analysis for migration policies and politics.