Laura E Brettell

Laura E Brettell
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine · Vector Group

About

40
Publications
12,694
Reads
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1,593
Citations
Citations since 2017
30 Research Items
1379 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300
20172018201920202021202220230100200300
20172018201920202021202220230100200300

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs), are a group of nonpathogenic flaviviruses that only infect insects. ISFs can have a high prevalence in mosquito populations, but their transmission routes are not well understood.
Article
Full-text available
Co-flowering plants can experience an array of interactions, ranging from facilitation to competition, the direction and strength of which are often dependent on the relative abundance and diversity of the plant species involved and the foraging behavior of their pollinators. Understanding interactions between plant–pollinator networks and how they...
Article
Supporting and promoting invertebrate diversity within agricultural ecosystems has numerous benefits, including the provision of pollination services. Many insects, including wild pollinators, require floral resources for food and structural habitat for nesting. To support pollinators, research studies and agri‐environment schemes have sought to su...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cell fusing agent virus (CFAV) is an insect specific flavivirus (ISF) found in field and laboratory populations of Aedes aegypti . ISFs have recently demonstrated the ability to block the transmission of arboviruses such as dengue, West Nile and Zika viruses. It is thought that vertical transmission is the main route for ISF infections. This has be...
Article
Many food crops depend on animal pollination to set fruit. In light of pollinator declines there is growing recognition of the need for agro-ecosystems that can sustain wild pollinator populations, ensuring fruit production and pollinator conservation into the future. One method of supporting resident wild pollinator populations within agricultural...
Article
Full-text available
In 1977, a sample of diseased adult honeybees ( Apis mellifera ) from Egypt was found to contain large amounts of a previously unknown virus, Egypt bee virus, which was subsequently shown to be serologically related to deformed wing virus (DWV). By sequencing the original isolate, we demonstrate that Egypt bee virus is in fact a fourth unique, majo...
Article
Island ecosystems, which often contain undescribed insects and small populations of single island endemics, are at risk from diverse threats. The spread of pathogens is a major factor affecting not just pollinator species themselves, but also posing significant knock-on effects to often fragile island ecosystems through disruption of pollination ne...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stingless bees are globally important social corbiculate bees, fulfilling critical pollination roles in many ecosystems; however, their gut microbiota, especially fungal communities, are not well characterized to date. We collected 121 bee samples from two species, Tetragonula carbonaria and Austroplebeia australis , across a distance of 1,200 km o...
Article
Tephritid fruit flies are amongst the most devastating pests of horticulture, and Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs have been developed for their control. Their interactions with viruses are still mostly unexplored, yet, viruses may negatively affect tephritid health and performance in SIT programs, and, conversely, constitute potential biolo...
Article
Maintaining beneficial interactions with microbial symbionts is vital for animal health. Yet, for social insects, the stability of microbial associations within and between cohorts is largely unknown. We investigated temporal changes in the microbiomes of nine stingless bee (Tetragonula carbonaria) colonies at seven timepoints across a ten-month pe...
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Full-text available
The global spread of a parasitic mite (Varroa destructor) has resulted in Deformed wing virus (DWV), a previously rare pathogen, now dominating the viromes in honey bees and contributing to large-scale honey bee colony losses. DWV can be found in diverse insect taxa and has been implicated in spilling over from honey bees into associated ("apiary")...
Article
Plants are subjected to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses in life. These can induce changes in transcriptomics and metabolomics, resulting in changes to root and leaf exudates and, in turn, altering the plant-associated microbial community. Emerging evidence demonstrates that changes, especially the increased abundance of commensal microbes follo...
Article
The phyllosphere harbors diverse microbial communities that influence ecosystem functioning. Emerging evidence suggests that plants impaired in genetic networks harbor an altered microbiome and develop dysbiosis in the phyllosphere, which pinpoints plant genetics as a key driver of the phyllosphere microbiome assembly and links the phyllosphere mic...
Article
Australia remains the last significant land mass free of Varroa, a parasitic mite which has caused dramatic honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony losses across the globe, due to its association with the pathogenic deformed wing virus (DWV). As such, Australia continues to maintain relatively healthy honey bee populations, despite recent work showing ap...
Article
Full-text available
Globalization has facilitated the spread of emerging pests such as the Varroa destructor mite, resulting in the near global distribution of the pest. In South African and Brazilian honey bees, mite-resistant colonies appeared within a decade; in Europe, mite-resistant colonies are rare, but several of these exhibited high levels of “re-capping” beh...
Article
Deformed wing virus (DWV) has become the most well-known, widespread, and intensively studied insect pathogen in the world. Although DWV was previously present in honeybee populations, the arrival and global spread of a new vector, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, has dramatically altered DWV epidemiology. DWV is now the most prevalent vir...
Article
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is the most abundant viral pathogen of honey bees and has been associated with large-scale colony losses. DWV and other bee-associated RNA viruses are generalists capable of infecting diverse hosts. Here, we used RNAseq analysis to test the hypothesis that due to the frequency of interactions, a range of apiary pest specie...
Article
The plant holobiont extends the plant’s capacity for nutrient acquisition and stress protection. Recent studies show that under biotic stress plants can promote the acquisition of certain beneficial bacteria to their rhizosphere. Active emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a newly identified mechanism utilized by plants for this process...
Article
Full-text available
Varroa destructor, a parasitic mite of honey bees, is also a vector for viral diseases. The mite displays high host specificity and requires access to colonies of Apis spp. to complete its lifecycle. In contrast, the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), one of the many viruses transmitted by V. destructor, appears to have a much broader host range. Previous...
Article
Full-text available
Here, we report the full-genome sequence of Milolii virus, a novel single-stranded (positive-sense) RNA virus discovered from Tapinoma melanocephalum ants in Hawaii. The genome is 10,475 nucleotides long, encoding a polyprotein of 3,304 amino acids.
Article
Full-text available
The ecto-parasitic mite Varroa destructor has transformed the previously inconsequential Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) into the most important honey bee viral pathogen responsible for the death of millions of colonies worldwide. Naturally, DWV persists as a low level covert infection transmitted between nest-mates. It has long been speculated that Varr...
Article
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) in association with Varroa destructor is currently attributed to being responsible for colony collapse in the western honey bee (Apis mellifera). The appearance of deformed individuals within an infested colony has long been associated with colony losses. However, it is unknown why only a fraction of DWV positive bees deve...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have suggested that covert stressors can contribute to bee colony declines. Here we provide a novel case study and show using radiofrequency identification tracking technology that covert deformed wing virus (DWV) infections in adult honeybee workers seriously impact long-term foraging and survival under natural foraging conditions....
Article
Full-text available
There is an increasing global trend of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) affecting a wide range of species, including honey bees. The global epidemic of the single stranded RNA Deformed wing virus (DWV), driven by the spread of Varroa destructor has been well documented. However, DWV is just one of many insect RNA viruses which infect a wide rang...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 50 years, many millions of European honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies have died as the ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has spread around the world. Subsequent studies have indicated that the mite's association with a group of RNA viral pathogens (Deformed Wing Virus, DWV) correlates with colony death. Here, we propose a pheno...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging diseases are among the greatest threats to honey bees. Unfortunately, where and when an emerging disease will appear are almost impossible to predict. The arrival of the parasitic Varroa mite into the Hawaiian honey bee population allowed us to investigate changes in the prevalence, load, and strain diversity of honey bee viruses. The mite...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Study of soil and plant microbiome in agricultural industry
Archived project
In this project we studied the role of deformed wing virus in the ongoing honeybee declines.