Laura Bowater

Laura Bowater
University of East Anglia | UEA · Norwich Medical School

PhD

About

36
Publications
7,105
Reads
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685
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
281 Citations
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
The COVID‐19 pandemic has disrupted economies and societies throughout the world since early 2020. Education is especially affected, with schools and universities widely closed for long periods. People under 25 years have the lowest risk of severe disease but their activities can be key to persistent ongoing community transmission. A challenge aros...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted economies and societies throughout the world in 2020. Education was especially affected, with schools and universities widely closed for long periods. People under 25 years have the lowest risk of severe disease but their activities can be key to persistent ongoing community transmission. A challenge arose for how to...
Article
Full-text available
In response to the accepted risk of emerging antimicrobial resistance, many organizations and institutions have developed and delivered events and activities designed to raise awareness of the issue and to change the behaviour of the intended audience. However, few of these events for a general public audience are documented or able to be sourced b...
Article
The increase in Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) microorganisms has been exacerbated by exposure to antimicrobial drugs (e.g. antibiotics). A solution to AMR may require academic researchers to not only contribute to the drug discovery pipeline through laboratory research, but also to engage and inform non-specialist audiences using a variety of inte...
Article
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a significant, emerging threat to global public health. In this article, we describe the scale of the threat and why it is such a global concern. We also outline actions that have been identified to address this threat, which includes focusing on the education of healthcare workers and clinicians, as well as member...
Article
While numerous studies examine perceptions of research held by university researchers, studies examining perceptions held by school pupils are rare. To address this gap and following analysis of questionnaire data (N = 2634, KS3/4/5 pupils), we conducted 11 group interviews with 100 pupils in England to investigate their experiences of research dur...
Article
The November 2016 special issue of the Microbiology Australia is the first joint one with the Microbiology Society of the UK. Deciding on an appropriate theme for this issue, the 'Microbial Diseases of Travel' was a relatively straightforward task and a direct 'fallout' from the geographical distance that separates our two societies. In the recorde...
Article
The 3rd of August 1492 marked the start of one of the most significant periods of global exploration, travel and migration. Setting sail from Palos on the Portuguese coast, Christopher Columbus, sponsored by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, headed westward bound for the Canary Islands. From the Canaries, Columbus continued his voyage. Th...
Article
Figure View largeDownload slide In the week that an international team of publishers, science communicators and other scholarly organisations launch the second international Peer Review Week; the preliminary findings from our new survey reveal that authors gain more from peer review than the people who do the actual reviews. Graphical Abstract F...
Article
Full-text available
Young people's views on what research is, how it is conducted and whether it is important, influences the decisions they make about their further studies and career choices. In this paper we report the analysis of questionnaire data with a particular focus on pupil perceptions of research in the sciences and of the scientific method. The questionna...
Article
As early as 1945, in his Nobel Prize Lecture titled 'Penicillin' Alexander Fleming declared, "There is the danger that the ignorant man may easily underdose himself and by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug make them resistant".
Article
Full-text available
Young people's views on research, how it's conducted and whether it's important, influences the decisions they make about their further studies and career choices. We investigate how research is represented within the English national curriculum and the examination boards because we recognise that what is being taught influences secondary pupil vie...
Article
To address the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) it is necessary to invest in, inspire and attract future generations of scientists to this research area. Undergraduate education should be a focus for attention and efforts should be made to ensure that students are afforded opportunities to actively engage with AMR. We illustrate ho...
Article
Full-text available
Synthetic biology has developed rapidly in the 21st century. It covers a range of scientific disciplines that incorporate principles from engineering to take advantage of and improve biological systems, often applied to specific problems. Methods important in this subject area include the systematic design and testing of biological systems and, her...
Article
Full-text available
We continue to be warned about the risk of antibiotic resistance. This campaign has targeted medicine and agriculture, asking these industries to pay attention to the risks of widespread resistance and to cut the use of antibiotics wherever possible. However, there has been little to no mention of the widespread use of antibiotics in the scientific...
Book
Science communication is a rapidly expanding area and meaningful engagement between scientists and the public requires effective communication. Designed to help the novice scientist get started with science communication, this unique guide begins with a short history of science communication before discussing the design and delivery of an effectiv...
Article
The proliferation of science fiction in film and visual media brings scientific topics to large audiences, inspiring many people to develop a serious interest in scientific studies. Increasingly, science fiction is being used as a tool in the teaching of science and visual media provide excellent opportunities to foster student engagement and encou...
Article
The contributors to this discussion teach in three different Faculties at the University of East Anglia (UEA) - Science, Arts & Humanities and Medicine & Health Sciences. They have each used science fiction to explore learning outcomes in their distinct teaching practices. The discussion below highlights how contemporary science fiction can operate...
Article
Teaching research ethics is a requirement within modern health science, nursing and medical curricula. We have drawn on our experience of designing, developing and integrating the teaching of research ethics in a new, fully integrated medical school curriculum, delivered using Problem Based Learning and the recent literature relating to the teachin...
Article
A high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) study of oxalate decarboxylase (OxdC) is reported. OxdC breaks down oxalate to carbon dioxide and formate and possesses two distinct manganese(II) binding sites, referred to as site-1 and -2. The Mn(II) zero-field interaction was used to probe the electronic state of the metal ion and to examine...
Article
Biological systems that involve enzyme catalysis at surfaces, particularly strategically important ones that involve insoluble substrates/products such as the cell wall and the starch granule, require analyses beyond classical solution state enzymology. Using a model system, we have demonstrated the real-time measurement of transglucosidase activit...
Article
Full-text available
Oxalate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.2) catalyses the conversion of oxalate into carbon dioxide and formate. It requires manganese and, uniquely, dioxygen for catalysis. It forms a homohexamer and each subunit contains two similar, but distinct, manganese sites termed sites 1 and 2. There is kinetic evidence that only site 1 is catalytically active and...
Article
Oxalate decarboxylases and oxalate oxidases are members of the cupin superfamily of proteins that have many common features: a manganese ion with a common ligand set, the substrate oxalate, and dioxygen (as either a unique cofactor or a substrate). We have hypothesized that these enzymes share common catalytic steps that diverge when a carboxylate...
Article
Full-text available
Oxalate oxidase is thought to be involved in the production of hydrogen peroxide for lignin degradation by the dikaryotic white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. This enzyme was purified, and after digestion with trypsin, peptide fragments of the enzyme were sequenced using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Starting with degenerate...
Article
DNA ligases are essential enzymes in cells due to their ability to join DNA strand breaks formed during DNA replication. Several temperature-sensitive mutant strains of Escherichia coli, including strain GR501, have been described which can be complemented by functional DNA ligases. Here, it is shown that the ligA251 mutation in E. coli GR501 strai...
Article
Full-text available
Oxalate decarboxylase (OxdC) from Bacillus subtilis is a hexamer containing two manganese ions per 43.6 kDa subunit. A single highly redundant data set collected at a medium resolution of 2 A on an in-house X-ray source was sufficient to solve the structure by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) method using the anomalous signal from...
Article
Full-text available
Oxalate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.2) catalyzes the conversion of oxalate to formate and carbon dioxide and utilizes dioxygen as a cofactor. By contrast, the evolutionarily related oxalate oxidase (EC 1.2.3.4) converts oxalate and dioxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen peroxide. Divergent free radical catalytic mechanisms have been proposed for these...
Article
The Bacillus subtilis genome contains genes for three hypothetical proteins belonging to the bicupin family, two of which we have previously shown to be Mn(II)-dependent oxalate decarboxylases. We have now shown that the third, YxaG, exhibits quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase activity and that it contains Fe ions. This contrasts with the eukaryotic enzyme...
Article
Full-text available
The Bacillus subtilis oxalate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.2), YvrK, converts oxalate to formate and CO2. YvrK and the related hypothetical proteins YoaN and YxaG from B. subtilis have been successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant YvrK and YoaN were found to be soluble enzymes with oxalate decarboxylase activity only when expressed in...

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