Laura C Bott

Laura C Bott
Northwestern University | NU · Department of Molecular Biosciences

PhD

About

33
Publications
5,752
Reads
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1,215
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2015 - present
Northwestern University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2010 - November 2015
National Institutes of Health
Position
  • Fellow
December 2008 - March 2015
Karolinska Institutet
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (33)
Preprint
Carboxy terminal fragments (CTFs) of TDP-43 contain an intrinsically disordered region (IDR) and form cytoplasmic condensates containing amyloid fibrils. Such condensates are toxic and associated with pathogenicity in several neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. However, the mol...
Article
Full-text available
The vacuolar H+-ATPase is a large multi-subunit proton pump, composed of an integral membrane V0 domain, involved in proton translocation, and a peripheral V1 domain, catalysing ATP hydrolysis. This complex is widely distributed on the membrane of various subcellular organelles, such as endosomes and lysosomes, and plays a critical role in cellular...
Preprint
Full-text available
The vacuolar H+-ATPase is a large multi-subunit proton pump, composed of an integral membrane V0 domain, involved in proton translocation, and a peripheral V1 domain, catalysing ATP hydrolysis. This complex is widely distributed on the membrane of various subcellular organelles, such as endosomes and lysosomes, and plays a critical role in cellular...
Article
The proteostasis network is regulated by transcellular communication to promote health and fitness in metazoans. In Caenorhabditis elegans, signals from the germline initiate the decline of proteostasis and repression of cell stress responses at reproductive maturity, indicating that commitment to reproduction is detrimental to somatic health. Here...
Article
Full-text available
RNA interference via the endogenous miRNA pathway regulates gene expression by controlling protein synthesis through post-transcriptional gene silencing. In recent years, miRNA-mediated gene regulation has shown potential for treatment of neurological disorders caused by a toxic gain of function mechanism. However, efficient delivery to target tiss...
Article
Full-text available
The proteostasis network (PN) regulates protein synthesis, folding, transport, and degradation to maintain proteome integrity and limit the accumulation of protein aggregates, a hallmark of aging and degenerative diseases. In multicellular organisms, the PN is regulated at the cellular, tissue, and systemic level to ensure organismal health and lon...
Article
Full-text available
Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked neuromuscular disease that is fully manifest only in males. It has been suggested that proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts impair ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis due to their propensity to aggregate, but recent studies indicat...
Data
List of evolutionarily conserved predicted miRNA-binding sites in the 3'UTR of human AR using the miRanda, miRDB, miRWalk, and Targetscan databases.
Data
Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed on predicted targets of miR-298 using the Targetscan v6 algorithm.
Article
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, also known as Kennedy's disease) is one of nine neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG repeats. Intracellular accumulation of abnormal proteins in these diseases, a pathological hallmark, is associated with defects in protein homeostasis. Enhancement of the ce...
Article
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. As an X-linked disease dependent on androgens, symptoms and findings are only fully manifest in males. Here we describe a 40-year-old male-to-female transgender SBMA patient who developed full disease manifestations despite undetectable levels of andro...
Article
Full-text available
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a currently untreatable adult-onset neuromuscular disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the androgen receptor (AR). In SBMA, as in other polyglutamine diseases, a toxic gain of function in the mutant protein is an important factor in the disease mechanism; therefore, reducing the mutan...
Article
Full-text available
Expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding trinucleotide CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) to more than 37 repeats is responsible for the X-linked neuromuscular disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Here we evaluated the effect of polyglutamine length on AR function in Xenopus oocytes. This allowed us to correlate the nuclear AR conc...
Poster
OBJECTIVE: To characterize spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) disease features in a patient who has undergone long term spironolactone treatment for male-to-female gender reassignment. BACKGROUND: SBMA is a neuromuscular disease caused by repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA is characterized by atrophy, fasciculations, a...
Article
The family of genes implicated in hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) is quickly expanding, mostly owing to the widespread availability of next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Nevertheless, a genetic diagnosis remains unavailable for many patients. To identify the genetic cause for a novel form of pure autosomal dominant HSP. We examined and f...
Article
Full-text available
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Patients with SBMA have weakness, atrophy, and fasciculations in the bulbar and extremity muscles. Individuals with CAG repeat lengths greater than 62 have not previously been reported. We ev...
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases based on the presence of deposits consisting of ubiquitylated proteins in affected neurons. It has been postulated that aggregation-prone proteins associated with these disorders, such as α-synuclein, β-amyloid peptide, and polyglutamine proteins, compromise UPS...
Article
Full-text available
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, Kennedy's disease), is a motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor. Although degeneration occurs in the spinal cord and muscle, the exact mechanism is not clear. Induced pluripotent stem cells from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patients provide a useful mode...
Article
Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor causes Kennedy's disease. Two recent reports, Cortes et al. (2014) in this issue of Neuron and Lieberman et al. (2014) in Cell Reports, raise the possibility that targeting expression of the mutant protein in skeletal muscle, instead of the nervous system, may mitigate manifestations of this disorder...
Article
Full-text available
The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds chromatin regions containing well-characterized cis-...
Article
Full-text available
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy, and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen inse...
Article
Full-text available
VCP (VCP/p97) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the AAA(+)-ATPase family of chaperone-like proteins that regulates numerous cellular processes including chromatin decondensation, homotypic membrane fusion and ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation by the proteasome. Mutations in VCP cause a multisystem degenerative disease consisting of inclus...
Article
The multifunctional AAA-ATPase p97 is one of the most abundant and conserved proteins in eukaryotic cells. The p97/Npl4/Ufd1 complex dislocates proteins that fail the protein quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol where they are subject to degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Substrate dislocation depends on the unfo...

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