Laura M Bolt

Laura M Bolt
University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) · Anthropology

PhD

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28
Publications
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147
Citations

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Squeals are sharp and forceful short-range vocalizations used as aggressive and submissive agonistic signals by many mammalian species. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), a female-dominant strepsirhine primate, has a male-specific squeal call with proposed male-male agonistic functions and male-female courtship functions that have never been empi...
Article
Full-text available
Long calls are sex-specific vocalizations used for mate attraction or mate defense in many animal species. Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), female-dominant strepsirrhines, have a male-specific long call termed a howl, with proposed functions that have never been empirically tested. I aimed to investigate why ring-tailed lemur males howl and to tes...
Article
Full-text available
In mammals, purring has been described in mostly affiliative contexts. In the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), both males and females purr, but only males were observed purring in agonistic contexts. In order to determine whether male ring-tailed lemurs purr as aggressive displays during intrasexual agonistic encounters, 480 h of focal data were co...
Article
Full-text available
The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a group-living strepsirrhine primate endemic to Madagascar that faces considerable predation pressure from aerial and terrestrial predators. This species engages in mobbing and vigilance behavior in response to predators , and has referential alarm vocalizations. Because L. catta is female dominant, less is kn...
Chapter
Charles Darwin had an unexpected theory on music’s origins. He suggested that human music, like the acoustic communication of songbirds, is a sexually selected adaptation for courtship. Men sing to attract potential mates, and women accept the males they find the most appealing. Darwin based his theory on the similarity between birdsong and human m...
Article
Full-text available
Primate population size and demography are important to quantify as part of ongoing conservation efforts in tropical regions. The mantled howler monkey (Alouatta palliata) has a wide range from southern Mexico, through Central America to western Colombia, Ecuador and just into Tumbes, Peru. It is known to persist in anthropogenically-disturbed habi...
Article
Full-text available
With the majority of primates living close to forest edges, it is imperative to under- stand how edges afect primate distribution and behaviour. Defnitions of edge, however, vary across studies, with many defning edge a priori and few explicitly measuring the depth of edge infuence (DEI). In this study, we aimed to functionally defne edge for mantl...
Article
Anthropogenic forest fragmentation impacts many aspects of animal behaviour, including feeding ecology. With forests increasingly fragmented in tropical regions due to human development, the proportion of forest edge (≤ 100 m from clear-cut regions) is higher relative to forest interior. Forest edges differ in vegetation from interior, making it im...
Article
Full-text available
Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relates to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, w...
Article
Maderas Rainforest Conservancy (MRC) was incorporated as a conservation nonprofit organization in 2008, and manages two sites where biological field courses have been offered since the 1990s: La Suerte Biological Research Station in Costa Rica, and Ometepe Biological Research Station in Nicaragua. MRC employs a One Health approach to conservation e...
Article
Vocalizations are used by group-living animals as aggressive and submissive signals during agonistic interactions, and also maintain dominance hierarchies in many species. For gregarious strepsirrhines with large vocal repertoires and differentiated dominance ranks like the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), agonistic vocalization use is important to...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Many group-living primate species have evolved the capacity for some individuals to live alone for part of their lives, but this solitary life stage has rarely been the subject of focused research. The mantled howler monkey (Alouatta palliata) is a social primate species with bisexual dispersal that lives in mixed-sex groups with low ma...
Article
Forest fragmentation increases forest edge relative to forest interior, with lower vegetation quality common for primates in edge zones. Because most primates live in human-modified tropical forests within 1 km of edge, it is critical to understand how primates cope with edge effects. Few studies have investigated how primates inhabiting a fragment...
Article
Affiliative vocalizations occur across primate taxa, and may be used to maintain spatial cohesion and/or to regulate social interactions in group-living species. For gregarious strepsirhines like the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), with large vocal repertoires and several distinct affiliative vocalizations including the chirp and wail, it is impor...
Chapter
Haplorhini is one of two suborders in the order Primates and a type of eutherian mammal. Haplorhine (Haplorhini) primates consist of tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans.
Chapter
Primates are mammals with complex and large brains compared to body size and traits including an enhanced sense of touch, increased reliance on vision, and reduced reliance on sense of smell compared to other mammals. Their sensory systems allow them to perceive and interpret the world around them, and include vision (sight), olfaction (smell), gus...
Article
Rivers represent natural edges in forests, serving as transition zones between landscapes. Natural edge effects are important to study to understand how intrinsic habitat variations affect wildlife as well as the impact of human‐induced forest fragmentation. We examined the influence of riparian and anthropogenic edge on mantled howler, white‐faced...
Article
The ways that forest edges may affect animal vocalization behaviour are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of various types of edge habitat on the loud calls (howls) of a folivorous-frugivorous primate species, Alouatta palliata, with reference to the ecological resource defence hypothesis, which predicts that males howl to defend veget...
Article
The function of long calling is a subject of interest across animal behaviour study, particularly within primatology. Many primate species have male‐specific long‐distance calls, including platyrrhines like the folivorous howler monkey (Alouatta spp.). Howler monkeys may howl to defend resources such as feeding trees or areas of rich vegetation fro...
Article
When a forest is fragmented, this increases the amount of forest edge relative to the interior. Edge effects can lead to loss of animal and plant species and decreased plant biomass near forest edges. We examined the influence of an anthropogenic forest edge comprising cattle pasture, coconut plantations, and human settlement on the mantled howler...
Article
The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a group-living strepsirhine primate endemic to Madagascar that has a complex vocal repertoire including affiliative moan and hmm calls. Past research has suggested that both vocalisations may be contact calls, and we assessed their usage in addition to examining the effect of individual differences and social...
Chapter
When a predator is seen, animals from various taxa produce alarm vocalizations. In some cases, alarm calling when a predator is nearby drives the predator away, but in other cases, the caller is pursued by the predator. Calling therefore often leads to greater risk to the vocalizer. Some rodents make anti-predator vocalizations despite this greater...
Chapter
The predator confusion hypothesis (Sherman 1977, 1981) predicts that group-living animals are adapted to make alarm calls that distract or confuse predators, thus lowering the predator’s chances of consuming any prey individual. In birds and mammals, some species make antipredator vocalizations that are thought to confound predators (Ficken 1989)....
Thesis
Full-text available
Sex-specific calls are used in male-male agonistic encounters and male-female courtship in many animal species. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a gregarious Malagasy strepsirhine with twenty-two distinct vocalizations for adults, including two male-specific vocalizations and an additional vocalization with male-specific functions: the howl,...
Chapter
This chapter will outline the evolution/creation controversy, providing summaries of the theories under debate, definitions of belief systems involved in the debate, an overview of debate history and important events in the United States, reasons why this controversy continues today, and ways that this controversy can be alleviated. This chapter cl...
Article
Full-text available
The ringtailed lemur (Lemur catta) of Madagascar has been the flagship species for lemur communication research over the past forty years. This article offers a preliminary investigation on how theories about human interaction and communication by Erving Goffman, Emanuel Schegloff, and Jack Sidnell can be applied to L. catta social interaction. Thr...
Book
Charles Darwin suggested that in the evolutionary past, women preferred to mate with musical men. Men made music in order to attract potential mates, and women chose the best musicians to father their children. Geoffrey Miller recently furthered Darwin's suggestions. However, the theories of both researchers are limited by their ethnocentric percep...

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