Lars Øystein Ursin

Lars Øystein Ursin
Norwegian University of Science and Technology | NTNU · Department of Public Health and Nursing

PhD

About

42
Publications
13,229
Reads
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380
Citations
Introduction
Lars Øystein Ursin is Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Public Health at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Current research projects and committee appointments include research ethics, neonatal clinical ethics, biobank and health data ethics, philosophy of death, ethics of biotechnology, animal ethics, and RRI in higher education, basic research and food production.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - May 2015
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • "Eco-values as product quality attributes in manufacturing agricultural food ingredients"
January 2012 - present
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • "The ethical basis for parental decisions regarding medical treatment of extremely premature babies"
January 2009 - December 2012
Norwegian University of Technology and Science
Position
  • "In genes we trust? Biobanks, society and everyday life"

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
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The worldwide decline in bees and other pollinating insects is a threat to biodiversity and food security, and urgent action must be taken to stop and then reverse this decline. An established cause of the insect decline is the use of harmful pesticides in agriculture. This case study focuses on the use of pesticides in Norwegian apple production a...
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Advances in neonatology have led to improved survival for periviable infants. Immaturity still carries a high risk of short- and long-term harms, and uncertainty turns provision of life support into an ethical dilemma. Shared decision-making with parents has gained ground. However, the need to start immediate life support and the ensuing difficulty...
Article
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Why do some people withdraw from biobank studies? To our knowledge, very few studies have been done on the reflections of biobank ex-participants. In this article, we report from such a study. 16 years ago, we did focus group interviews with biobank participants and ex-participants. We found that the two groups interestingly shared worries concerni...
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The effective collection and management of personal data of rapidly migrating populations is important for ensuring adequate healthcare and monitoring of a displaced peoples’ health status. With developments in ICT data sharing capabilities, electronic personal health records (ePHRs) are increasingly replacing less transportable paper records. ePHR...
Article
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Biobanks have evolved, and their governance procedures have undergone important transformations. Our paper examines this issue by focusing on the perspective of the professionals working in management or scientific roles in research-based biobanks, who have an important impact on shaping these transformations. In particular, it highlights that rece...
Article
Background Neonatologists, legal experts and ethicists extensively discuss the ethical challenges of decision-making when a child is born at the limit of viability. The voices of parents are less heard in this discussion. In Norway, parents are actively shielded from the burden of decision-making responsibility. In an era of increasing patient auto...
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1 | INTRODUC TI ON Collecting and maintaining health data of a rapidly migrating population in times of crisis is, amongst other things, important for ensuring adequate healthcare and accurate monitoring of a displaced and vulnerable peoples' health status. With developments in data sharing capabilities in ICT (eHealth), electronic personal health...
Article
The interesting article by Beskow and Weinfurt (2019) seems to document biobank researchers’ unclear intuitions and convictions on a basic idea of research ethics: that the legitimacy of informed consent in biobank research depends on a certain level of participant comprehension. According to this idea, if biobank participants fail to meet the requ...
Article
Withholding and withdrawing treatment are widely regarded as ethically equivalent in medical guidelines and ethics literature. Health care personnel, however, widely perceive moral differences between withholding and withdrawing. The proponents of equivalence argue that any perceived difference can be explained in terms of cognitive biases and flaw...
Chapter
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Article
In this article, I identify 3 ways of justifying neonatal policies of when to provide life-saving treatment to infants who were born extremely premature: by appealing to universal principles or rights, to considerations of the best interests of the children, or to considerations of the best interests of the families. I go on to show how each of the...
Article
Objectives: The role of parents in life-and-death decision-making for infants born at the border of viability is challenging. Some argue that parents should have the final say in decisions about life-sustaining treatment. Others disagree. In this article, we report views from health care personnel (HCP) on the appropriate parental role. Methods:...
Article
Respecting people’s consent choices for use of their material and data is a cornerstone of biobank ethics. Participation in biobanks is characteristically based on broad consent that presupposes an ongoing possibility of informing and interacting with participants over time. The death of a participant means the end of any interaction, but usually n...
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The meat paradox- to like eating meat, but dislike killing and harming animals-confronts omnivores with a powerful contradiction between eating and caring for animals. The paradox, however, trades on a conflation of the illegitimacy of harming and killing animals. While harming animals is morally wrong, killing animals can be legitimate if done wit...
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In a world where issues of food safety and food security are increasingly important, the social responsibility of central actors in the food chain—producers and the main grocery chains—becomes more pressing. As a response, these actors move from implicitly assuming social responsibilities implied in laws, regulations and ethical customs, towards ex...
Chapter
Norwegian farming is among the most subsidized and protected areas of food production in the world. In a world where issues of food safety and food security are increasingly important, the social responsibility of central actors in the food chain - producers and the main grocery chains - becomes more pressing. As a response, these actors move from...
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This special issue of Etikk i praksis features papers that articulate and discuss approaches and methodology that seek to make normative research activity and research output productive in contexts of ongoing societal and technological decision-making. The articles in various ways and to a varying degree exemplify and reflect on the methodology of...
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Great hope has been placed on biobank research as a strategy to improve diagnostics, therapeutics and prevention. It seems to be a common opinion that these goals cannot be reached without the participation of commercial actors. However, commercial use of biobanks is considered morally problematic and the commercialisation of human biological mater...
Chapter
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Envisioned technologies can make and be motivated by ethical spaces. In this paper I will explore the ethical spaces that motivates and are made by the emerging technology of cultured meat. Proponents of cultured - or in vitro - meat argue that it has the potential to present a solution to several of perceived problems of factory farming: Animal we...
Article
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Biobank research deals with personal information and data from blood and tissue analysis, making the questions of legitimate recruitment of participants and handling of their data to be intimately connected with the issue of privacy. Thus, identification of the privacy interests of biobank participants is vital to the legitimacy of biobank projects...
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Health surveys and biobank research projects involve large groups of people, in the role of participants as well as potential beneficiaries. In this article, the nature of biobank participation in ambitious welfare states is explored by a description and an analysis of the Norwegian HUNT project. The analysis of HUNT material brings forth a transfo...
Article
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A research biobank is a collection of personal health and lifestyle information, including genetic samples of yet unknown but possibly large information potential about the participant. For the participants, the risk of taking part is not bodily harm but infringements of their privacy and the harmful consequences such infringements might have. But...
Article
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Die ersten Karten des menschlichen Genoms wurden im Jahr 2000 präsentiert. Heute, zehn Jahre später, scheint die Sequenzierung des Genoms jedes einzelnen Bürgers, die es ermöglichen würde, die Vorsorge und Behandlung von Krankheiten zu personalisieren, nicht mehr allzu weit entfernt. In diesem Aufsatz werde ich einige ethische Herausforderungen son...
Chapter
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In this chapter the notion of principled autonomy is presented, and the perspective enabled by this notion is applied in the field of biobanking. Some consequences of the perspective of principled autonomy on aspects of biobank recruitment are discussed in relation to concepts of voluntariness, consent, and privacy. These discussions aim to focus o...
Chapter
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Rosamond Rhodes and John Harris have recently argued that we all have a general moral duty to participate in medical research. However, neither Rhodes’ nor Harris’ arguments in support of this obligation stand up to scrutiny, and severe and convincing criticism has been levelled against their case. Still, to refute their arguments is not to refute...
Article
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What is privacy? What does privacy mean in relation to biobanking, in what way do the participants have an interest in privacy, (why) is there a right to privacy, and how should the privacy issue be regulated when it comes to biobank research? A relational view of privacy is argued for in this article, which takes as its basis a general discussion...
Article
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Harris have both recently argued that we all have a general moral duty to participate in medical research. However, neither Rhodes' nor Harris' arguments in support of this obligation stand up to scru-tiny, and severe and convincing criticism has been levelled against their case. Still, to refute their arguments is not to refute the conclusion. The...
Article
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Two ways of understanding the notion of autonomy are outlined and discussed in this article, in order to clarify how and if informed consent requirements in biotechnological research are to be justified by the promotion of personal autonomy: A proceduralist conception linking autonomy with authenticity, and a substantivist conception linking autono...
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In January 2003 the Norwegian Parliament passed the Biobanks Act, regulating biobank research in Norway. There have been strong differences of opinion both in the process of making the law as well as in its first years of implementation. The main controversy relates to what kind of informed consent should be required for biobank research. Central t...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
What do we owe dead persons - if anything? Which interests do dead persons have - if any? In this project we investigate the ethics of dead persons, their possible interests and our possible relations to the dead.
Project
Infants born at the limit of viability constitute a major challenge in medical ethics. Diverging approaches between countries threatens the idea of an equal and fair health care service for this group. The question of whether active treatment at the limit of viability is clearly beneficial is contested, and the emphasis on parental autonomy has been strengthened as a result of several important health care laws. But what kind of decision-making authority is and should be given to parents in decisions relating to whether life-saving treatment of premature babies should be given or not? In this project we research the ethical views and arguments in neonatal life-and-death decision-making, and gain knowledge from interviews with a wide set of groups of health personnel, clarifying their experiences, viewpoints, and the ethical principles at stake.
Project
European Division of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics: it encompasses around 30 units of the International Network of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics. All these units are from Europe. The Division is headed by Vojin Rakic. He coordinates a Council of the European Division of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics.The Council members include UNESCO unit heads from Finland (Helena Siipi), England (Baroness Ilora Finlay, John Sanders), Austria (Gabriele Werner Felmayer), Belgium (Sigrid Sterckx), Ireland (Oliver Feeney) and Iceland (Salvor Nordal).