Lars Kirkhusmo Pharo

Lars Kirkhusmo Pharo
Nord University | HIBO · Practical Knowledge Programme

About

7
Publications
577
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
61
Citations

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
In various Mesoamerican cultures, i.e. civilisations of Middle America, a calendar name is part of the antroponym. Besides having conventional personal names, both human beings and deities carry day-names from the 260-day calendar. In addition, world ages or world periods, periods of the traditional 365-day calendar and the 52-year calendar as well...
Article
Scholars routinely confront the problem of translating concepts from one cognitive-linguistic system to another. The concepts “shaman” and “shamanism,” which are employed particularly in comparative religious and anthropological studies, are a case in point. Scholars from various academic disciplines make use of different, indistinct, and indeed co...
Article
Introducing a new theoretical category in religious studies, “ritual practice of time,” this essay constitutes an analysis about rituals of the structure of space and time of the Aztec fifty-two-year calendar in Mesoamerica. Time and space, completed and exhausted at the termination of the fifty-two-year cycle, had to be symbolically renewed and re...
Article
In an earlier article (Pharo 2007), the author investigated how Spanish ethnographer-missionaries and missionary-linguists of the Colonial period translated the concept of 'religion' into various indigenous Mesoamerican languages. In the present article, he concedes that "assorted Mesoamerican notions may well together, as a family of concepts, be...
Article
In an earlier article (Pharo 2007), the author investigated how Spanish ethnographer-missionaries and missionary-linguists of the Colonial period translated the concept of ‘religion’ into various indigenous Mesoamerican languages. In the present article, he concedes that “assorted Mesoamerican notions may well together, as a family of concepts, be...
Article
The article examines whether the indigenous languages in the cultural region called Mesoamerica comprise words corresponding to the European concept of "religion." In spite of the fact that the highly advanced phonetic (i.e. logosyllabic) writing systems are capable of expressing and recognising abstract representations in the languages, extant pre...