Lars Kooijman

Lars Kooijman
Deakin University · Institute for Intelligent Systems Research and Innovation

Master of Science

About

28
Publications
10,451
Reads
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129
Citations
Introduction
Lars Kooijman is a PhD student under A/Prof. Houshyar Asadi, A/Prof Shady Mohamed and Prof. Saeid Nahavandi at Deakin University, Australia. Lars obtained his master's degree in Biomedical Engineering from Delft University of Technology and his Bachelor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering from InHolland University of Applied Science in Alkmaar, The Netherlands.
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - June 2020
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Assistant Grants Officer
Description
  • - Assisting with pre-submission process for research-grants applications. - Liaising with researcher and research administrators about grant applications. - Recording grant application review and submission activities in management information systems.
November 2018 - December 2019
Delft University of Technology
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Working on two projects: -“How should automated vehicles communicate with other road users?” - A replication project regarding the study of Hess and Polt (1960) “Pupil size as related to interest value of visual stimuli”.
September 2017 - November 2017
The University of Calgary
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Examining the rate of force development in Human Adductor Pollicis muscle during voluntary isometric contractions and eccentric induced lengthening
Education
November 2020 - November 2023
Deakin University
Field of study
  • Engineering
September 2016 - October 2018
Delft University of Technology
Field of study
  • Biomechanical Engineering
September 2015 - April 2016
Delft University of Technology
Field of study
  • Premaster Biomechanical Engineering

Publications

Publications (28)
Conference Paper
The illusory sensation of self-motion is defined as vection. Vection research can help enhance Virtual Reality applications and improve simulator fidelity as vection appears to be a desired sensation in motion simulators. The experience of vection can be modulated by cognitive factors and potentially personal traits, such as the vividness of imagin...
Conference Paper
Vection is commonly defined as the illusory sensation of self-motion. Research on vection can assist in improving the fidelity of motion simulators. Vection can be influenced through top-down factors, such as attention, but previous research on the effect of a secondary task on vection presented conflicting findings. We investigated the effect of a...
Conference Paper
In the absence of physical motion, people sometimes experience the illusory sensation of self-motion which is known as vection. Vection and presence are positively related and vection research could contribute to the improvement of the fidelity of motion simulators. However, when utilizing Virtual Reality technology for motion simulators, visually-...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Past research suggests that displays on the exterior of the car, known as eHMIs, can be effective in helping pedestrians to make safe crossing decisions. This study examines a new application of eHMIs, namely the provision of directional information in scenarios where the pedestrian is almost hit by a car. In an experiment using a head-mounted disp...
Preprint
Full-text available
In the absence of physical motion, people sometimes experience the illusory sensation of self-motion which is known as vection. Vection and presence are positively related and vection research could contribute to the improvement of the fidelity of motion simulators. However, when utilizing Virtual Reality technology for motion simulators, visually-...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vection is commonly defined as the illusory sensation of self-motion. Research on vection can assist in improving the fidelity of motion simulators. Vection can be influenced through top-down factors, such as attention, but previous research on the effect of a secondary task on vection presented conflicting findings. We investigated the effect of a...
Preprint
Full-text available
The illusory sensation of self-motion is defined as vection. Vection research can help enhance Virtual Reality applications and improve simulator fidelity as vection appears to be a desired sensation in motion simulators. The experience of vection can be modulated by cognitive factors and potentially personal traits, such as the vividness of imagin...
Preprint
Full-text available
The sensation of self-motion in the absence of physical motion, known as vection, has been scientifically investigated for several decades. As reliable, objective measures of vection have yet to emerge, researchers have typically employed a variety of subjective methods to quantify the phenomenon of vection. These measures can be broadly categorize...
Article
Vection is classically defined as the illusory perception of self-motion induced via visual stimuli. The utility of vection research lies in its potential to enhance simulation fidelity, as measured through presence, and reduce the probability that motion sickness symptoms occur. Studies have shown a multimodal interaction of various sensory system...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The conflicts between the perceived sensation of the different sensory systems can cause adverse effects which is known as motion sickness (MS) and the side effects of MS include nausea, dizziness, stomach awareness etc. Virtual reality sickness (also called Cybersickness or visually induced motion sickness (VIMS)) happens during exposure to a virt...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vection is classically defined as the illusory perception of self-motion induced via visual stimuli. The utility of vection research lies in its potential to enhance simulation fidelity, as measured through presence, and reduce the probability that motion sickness symptoms occur. Studies have shown a multimodal interaction of various sensory system...
Preprint
Full-text available
The illusory perception of self-motion, which is called vection, is a phenomenon that is traditionally measured in passive participants. Research on vection during active control is often done through subjective reports using single intensity stimuli. Herein, we investigated how varying difficulty levels of active control as well as passive control...
Article
Full-text available
External human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) may be useful for communicating the intention of an automated vehicle (AV) to a pedestrian, but it is unclear which eHMI design is most effective. In a crowdsourced experiment, we examined the effects of (1) colour (red, green, cyan), (2) position (roof, bumper, windshield), (3) message (WALK, DON'T WALK, W...
Article
Full-text available
Automated vehicles (AVs) are able to detect pedestrians reliably but still have difficulty in predicting pedestrians' intentions from their implicit body language. is study examined the effects of using explicit hand gestures and receptive external human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) in the interaction between pedestrians and AVs. Twenty-six participa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Several papers by Eckhard Hess from the 1960s and 1970s report that the pupils dilate or constrict according to the interest value, arousing content, or mental demands of visual stimuli. However, Hess mostly used small sample sizes and undocumented luminance control. In a first experiment (N = 182) and a second preregistered experiment (N = 147), w...
Article
Full-text available
Future automated vehicles may be equipped with external Human-Machine Interfaces (eHMIs). Currently, little is known about the effect of the perspective of the eHMI message on crossing decisions of pedestrians. We performed an experiment to examine the effects of images depicting eHMI messages of different perspectives (egocentric from the pedestri...
Preprint
Full-text available
Automated vehicles (AVs) are able to detect pedestrians reliably but still have difficulty predicting the pedestrians’ intentions from their implicit body language. This study examined the effects of using explicit hand gestures and receptive external human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) in the interaction between pedestrians and automated vehicles (AV...
Article
Full-text available
Several papers by Eckhard Hess from the 1960s and 1970s report that the pupils dilate or constrict according to the interest value, arousing content, or mental demands of visual stimuli. However, Hess mostly used small sample sizes and undocumented luminance control. In a first experiment (N = 182) and a second preregistered experiment (N = 147), w...
Article
Full-text available
Much psychological research uses pupil diameter measurements for investigating the cognitive and emotional effects of visual stimuli. A potential problem is that accommodating at a nearby point constricts the pupil. This study examined to what extent accommodation is a confounder in pupillometry research. Participants solved multiplication problems...
Preprint
Full-text available
Much psychological research uses pupil diameter measurements for investigating the cognitive and emotional effects of visual stimuli. A potential problem is that accommodating at a nearby point constricts the pupil. This study examined to what extent accommodation is a confounder in pupillometry research. Participants solved multiplication problems...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Driving simulators are regarded as valuable tools for human factors research on automated driving and traffic safety. However, simulators that enable the study of human-human interactions are rare. In this study, we present an open-source coupled simulator developed in Unity. The simulator supports input from head-mounted displays, motion suits, an...
Poster
Full-text available
Driving simulators are regarded as valuable tools for human factors research on automated driving and traffic safety. However, simulators that enable the study of human-human interactions are rare. In this study, we present an open-source coupled simulator developed in Unity. The simulator supports input from head-mounted displays, motion suits, an...
Preprint
Full-text available
External human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) may be useful for communicating the intention of an automated vehicle (AV) to a pedestrian, but it is unclear which eHMI design is most effective. In a crowdsourced experiment, we examined the effects of (1) colour (red, green, cyan), (2) position (roof, bumper, windshield), (3) message (WALK, DON’T WALK, W...
Article
Full-text available
In future traffic, automated vehicles may be equipped with external human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) that can communicate with pedestrians. Previous research suggests that, during first encounters, pedestrians regard text-based eHMIs as clearer than light-based eHMIs. However, in much of the previous research, pedestrians were asked to imagine cros...
Preprint
In previous research on external Human-Machine Interfaces (eHMIs) for automated vehicles, pedestrians were asked to imagine to cross the road, but were unable or allowed to do so. We investigated the effects of eHMIs on participants’ crossing behavior. Twenty-four participants were immersed in a virtual urban environment by means of a head-mounted...
Poster
Full-text available
INTRODUCTION: The isometric maximum voluntary contraction (IMVC) force has been used to extrapolate to athletic performance. The speed of increase in force termed rate of force development (RFD) is defined as the slope of the force-time curve and has been associated with success in athletic events and maintenance of postural stability. During human...

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