Lars Bejder

Lars Bejder
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa | UH Manoa · Institute of Marine Biology

Professor, PhD, MSc, BSc

About

225
Publications
87,236
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
9,011
Citations
Citations since 2016
109 Research Items
5908 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
Introduction
Lars Bejder is the Director of the Marine Mammal Research Program at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology at the University of Hawaii. He has studied various aspects of cetacean biology, ecology and conservation in New Zealand, Australia and US. He has published > 150 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters on cetaceans (impacts of human activity; fundamental biology and ecology; statistical methods to analyse complex social structures).
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - April 2022
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Position
  • Marine Mammal Research Program
June 2014 - December 2017
Murdoch University
Position
  • Professor
April 2012 - April 2014
Murdoch University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (225)
Article
Full-text available
Studies evaluating effects of human activity on wildlife typically emphasize short-term behavioral responses from which it is difficult to infer biological significance or formulate plans to mitigate harmful impacts. Based on decades of detailed behavioral records, we evaluated long-term impacts of vessel activity on bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops s...
Article
1. Linking key ecological characteristics with animal behaviour is essential for identifying and protecting important habitats that support life functions. Spinner dolphins display a predictable diurnal behavioural pattern where they forage offshore at night and return to sheltered bays during daytime to rest. These bays, which are also subject to...
Article
Full-text available
Although gigantic body size and obligate filter feeding mechanisms have evolved in multiple vertebrate lineages (mammals and fishes), intermittent ram (lunge) filter feeding is unique to a specific family of baleen whales: rorquals. Lunge feeding is a high cost, high benefit feeding mechanism that requires the integration of unsteady locomotion (i....
Article
Wildlife management requires reliable demographic information to assess the status of a population and its vulnerability to threats. This study calculated age class‐ and sex‐specific demographic parameters and assessed the viability of a community of Indo‐Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) resident to the Peel‐Harvey Estuary in Western...
Chapter
Tourism and recreational activities now threaten the conservationConservation status of 21% of the marine mammalMarine mammals species recognized by the IUCN. In the past two decades, concerted efforts have been made to better understand the biological relevance of behavioral responses of marine mammals to whale-watchingWhale watchingdisturbanceDis...
Article
Full-text available
Background The reef manta ray ( Mobula alfredi ) is a globally threatened species and an iconic tourist attraction for visitors to Indonesia’s Komodo National Park (NP). In 2013, manta ray fishing was banned in Komodo NP and its surroundings, preceding the nationwide manta ray protection in 2014. Over a decade ago, a previous acoustic telemetry stu...
Article
Animal body size and growth patterns play important roles in shaping the life history of species. Baleen whales include the largest animals on the planet, with somatic growth costs expected to be substantial. We used unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry and long-term individual sighting histories from photo identification (1991−2019) to estimate...
Article
Food provisioning promotes close interaction with wildlife but can negatively impact the targeted species. Repeated behavioural disruptions have the potential to negatively impact vital rates and have population level consequences. In Bunbury, Western Australia, food-provisioned female bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops aduncus, suffer reduced reproduct...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is a global phenomenon, yet impacts on resource availability to predators may be spatially and temporally diverse and asynchronous. As capital breeders, whales are dependent on dense, predictable prey resources during foraging seasons. An Unusual Mortality Event (UME) of Eastern North Pacific (ENP) gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus)...
Article
Full-text available
Despite their enormous size, whales make their living as voracious predators. To catch their much smaller, more maneuverable prey, they have developed several unique locomotor strategies that require high energetic input, high mechanical power output and a surprising degree of agility. To better understand how body size affects maneuverability at t...
Article
Full-text available
Key points: Baleen whales exhibit some of the fastest foetal growth rates in the animal kingdom. Despite this, the energetic cost of gestation is largely unknown, as well as the influence of maternal body size on foetal growth rates and calf birth sizes. We combined historical whaling records and drone photogrammetry data to determine foetal growt...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding species’ distribution patterns and the environmental and ecological interactions that drive them is fundamental for biodiversity conservation. Data deficiency exists in areas that are difficult to access, or where resources are limited. We use a broad-scale, non-targeted dataset to describe dolphin distribution and habitat suitability...
Article
Full-text available
Conspecifics may vary in their space use and diet leading to niche partitioning within populations. In social species, such partitioning may correspond to social structure as closely associated individuals likely encounter the same resources. This study investigated whether space use and diet varied among social clusters of a resident estuarine pop...
Article
• Investigations of population structure across multiple niche dimensions can identify discrete management units within populations. This study examined social, spatial and isotopic niche partitioning in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) across ca. 600 km² of coastal and estuarine waters in south-western Australia, to evaluate whe...
Article
Full-text available
Major progress has been made since the publication of noise exposure criteria by Southall et al. (2007) in addressing the probability and severity of marine mammal behavioral responses to measured noise exposures. New methodological developments for studying behavioral responses have broadened the spatial, temporal, and population scales of potenti...
Article
Documented cases of cetacean births in the wild are rare. While there are currently no direct observations of a complete humpback whale birth, they are one of the few large whale species where observers have been present during a birthing event. We compiled eye-witnessed accounts of all known humpback whale birthing events and found nine well-docum...
Article
Kelp gulls Larus dominicanus (KG) feed on the skin and blubber of living southern right whales Eubalaena australis (SRWs) off Península Valdés (PV), Argentina. The whales respond strongly to KG micropredation by changing their immediate (acute) behavior during attacks and their overall (chronic) surfacing pattern and body posture to minimize gull e...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impacts of foraging disruptions to odontocete body condition is fundamental to quantifying biological effects of human disturbance and environmental changes on cetacean populations. Here, reductions in body volume of free-ranging pygmy killer whales (Feresa attenuata) were calculated using repeated measurements of the same individ...
Article
Full-text available
Insights into the food habits of predators are essential for maintaining healthy predator populations and the functioning of ecosystems. Stomach content and stable isotope analyses were used to investigate the foraging habits of an apex predator, the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in south-western Australia. A total of 2,594 pre...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Marine wildlife tourism attractions often use food rewards to ensure close-up encounters withfree-ranging animals. In Bunbury, Western Australia, the Dolphin Discovery Centre (DDC) conductsa food-provision program where bottlenose dolphins (N= 22; between 2000-2018) are offered foodrewards to encourage their visitation at a beach in front of the DD...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of nature-based tourism on wildlife has been the focus of much attention. Studies have demonstrated how boat-based cetacean-watching tourism can cause both short-term and long-term effects on targeted populations. However, limited attention has been given to the effect of swim-with activities on humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)....
Article
Full-text available
Increasing human activity along the coast has amplified the extinction risk of inshore delphinids. Informed selection and prioritisation of areas for the conservation of inshore delphinids requires a comprehensive understanding of their distribution and habitat use. In this study, we applied an ensemble species distribution modelling approach, comb...
Article
Full-text available
Wild dolphin-swim tourism has grown in specific locations where Hawaiian spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) have known resting habitat. The increased growth in dolphin-swim businesses has created an industry in Hawaii that earns an estimated $102 million (USD) annually in 2013. Semi-structured interviews with business owners, market research,...
Article
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are increasingly used for wildlife research and monitoring, but little information exists on their potential effect on marine mammals. We assessed the effects of a UAV on the behavior of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in Australia. Focal follows of ten right whale mother‐calf pairs were conducted using a...
Article
Full-text available
The North Atlantic right whale Eubalaena glacialis (NARW), currently numbering <410 individuals, is on a trajectory to extinction. Although direct mortality from ship strikes and fishing gear entanglements remain the major threats to the population, reproductive failure, resulting from poor body condition and sublethal chronic entanglement stress,...
Article
Full-text available
Human activities and anthropogenic environmental changes are having a profound effect on biodiversity and the sustainability and health of many populations and species of wild mammals. There has been less attention devoted to the impact of human activities on the welfare of individual wild mammals, although ethical reasoning suggests that the welfa...
Article
Swim-with-whale tourism is a lucrative and rapidly growing industry worldwide. Whale-watching can cause negative effects on the behaviour of targeted animals. Although this is believed to be particularly true for close-up interactions, such as swim-with operations, few empirical studies have investigated this. In 2016, the Western Australian State...
Article
The eastern North Pacific gray whale Eschrichtius robustus experienced an unusual mortality event (UME) in 2019-2020, with 384 whales found dead along the Pacific coasts of Mexico, USA and Canada. A similar UME in 1999-2000 was speculated to have been caused by starvation, but body condition data were not available to test this hypothesis. Between...
Presentation
Full-text available
Abstract: The viability of populations depends on metapopulation dynamics: the combination of reproduction and mortality within populations, as well as dispersal between populations. Population viability is also dependent on genetic diversity, which is essential for populations to adapt to environmental change. This study focuses on an Indo-Pacific...
Article
Full-text available
Place‐based management can be an effective conservation tool to protect cetaceans from anthropogenic pressures. The spatial use of the world's second largest population of the threatened Indo‐Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) is not well‐documented, which makes it challenging to designate protected areas for this population. To address th...
Article
Full-text available
Integrating Emerging Technologies into Marine Megafauna Conservation Management Many recent and emerging technological innovations hold great potential to transform the “best-available science” for marine megafauna conservation management, such as remote sensing, telemetry, molecular technologies, unmanned aerial vehicles, bio-acoustics, and anima...
Article
Most baleen whales migrate to low-latitude breeding grounds during winter to give birth and nurse their calves during the early stages of growth and development. While mothers invest a large amount of energy into the early development of their calves, the time allocated to important behaviours associated with maternal care (e.g. nursing) as well as...
Article
Full-text available
Obtaining morphometric data on free-ranging marine megafauna is difficult, as traditional methods rely on post-mortem or live-capture techniques. We linked stereo-laser photogrammetry with long-term demographic data to compare length-at-age (LaA) growth curves of two well-studied populations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in...
Article
Southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) invest substantial amounts of energy in their calves, while facing the risk of having them predated upon by eavesdropping killer whales (Orcinus orca). We tested the hypothesis that southern right whale mother-calf pairs employ acoustic crypsis to reduce acoustic detectability by such predators. Specifica...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Food-provisioning of wildlife can facilitate reliable up-close encounters desirable by tourists and, consequently, tour operators. Food-provisioning can alter the natural behavior of an animal, encouraging adverse behavior (e.g. begging for food handouts), and affect the reproductive success and the viability of a population. Studies linki...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic diversity is essential for populations to adapt to changing environments. Measures of genetic diversity are often based on selectively neutral markers, such as microsatellites. Genetic diversity to guide conservation management, however, is better reflected by adaptive markers, including genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)....
Raw Data
Manlik, O., Krützen, M., Kopps, A. M., Mann, J., Bejder, L., Allen, S. J., Frere, C., Connor, R.C., Sherwin, W. B. (2019). Data from: Is MHC diversity a better marker for conservation than neutral genetic diversity? A case study of two contrasting dolphin populations. Dryad Digital Repository. https ://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.73k278d
Article
Full-text available
This is the supplementary material to the article "Is MHC diversity a better marker for conservation than neutral genetic diversity? A case study of two contrasting dolphin population" (Manlik et al. 2019)
Article
Full-text available
Manta rays (Mobula spp.) are highly valued in nature-based tourism globally. In Indonesia, although manta rays are protected, critical information is lacking on their habitat use, population dynamics and movements. We investigate the population structure and residency patterns of reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) in the Nusa Penida Marine Protected...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding individual interactions within a community or population provides valuable insight into its social system, ecology, and, ultimately, resilience against external stimuli. Here, we used photo-identification data, generalized affiliation indices, and social network analyses to investigate dyadic relationships, assortative interactions, a...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the behaviour of humpback whale mother-calf pairs and the acoustic environment on their breeding grounds is fundamental to assessing the biological and ecological requirements needed to ensure a successful migration and survival of calves. Therefore, on a breeding/resting ground, Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia, we used animal-borne D...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the factors that contribute to a population’s habitat use is important for conservation planners and managers to identify reasons behind a population’s distribution. Habitat use often differs between sexes, however few studies on sexually monomorphic species document this difference, resulting in misleading ecological interpretations...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat selection is strongly influenced by spatial variations in habitat quality and predation risk. Repeated exposure of wildlife to anthropogenic activities in important habitats may affect habitat selection, leading to negative biological consequences. We quantified the cumulative human exposure of a small, genetically isolated and behaviourall...
Article
The forecast for the viability of populations depends upon metapopulation dynamics: the combination of reproduction and mortality within populations, as well as dispersal between populations. This study focuses on an Indo‐Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) population in coastal waters near Bunbury, Western Australia. Demographic modeling...
Article
Full-text available
Effective management of wildlife populations rely on knowledge of their abundance, survival, and reproductive rates. Maintaining long-term studies capable of estimating demographic parameters for long-lived, slow-reproducing species is challenging. Insights into the effects of research intensity on the statistical power to estimate demographic para...