Larissa Arakawa Martins

Larissa Arakawa Martins
University of Adelaide · School of Architecture and Built Environment

PhD

About

16
Publications
1,576
Reads
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45
Citations
Introduction
Larissa Arakawa Martins is a Postgraduate Research Fellow based in the School of Architecture & Built Environment, The University of Adelaide (Australia), researching on the association between the built environment, thermal comfort and people's health and wellbeing, as well as on the applications of data analysis and machine learning for predictive modelling.
Additional affiliations
March 2019 - May 2022
University of Adelaide
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Course Coordinator and Tutor in DESST 2517 - Environment II and Tutor in ARCH 7041 - Advanced Architecture Technologies - School of Architecture and Built Environment, The University of Adelaide, Australia
August 2010 - November 2014
University of São Paulo
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Tutor in PHD2412 - Urban Sanitation II (Saneamento II) and in PRO2315 - Ergonomics I (Ergonomia I) - Polytechnic School, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Education
December 2018 - May 2022
University of Adelaide
Field of study
  • Architecture
February 2016 - December 2016
Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes
Field of study
  • Civil Engineering
January 2012 - January 2013

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Purpose This paper presents the development of personal thermal comfort models for older adults and assesses the models’ performance compared to aggregate approaches. This is necessary as individual thermal preferences can vary widely between older adults, and the use of aggregate thermal comfort models can result in thermal dissatisfaction for a s...
Article
Full-text available
Older people are often over-represented in morbidity and mortality statistics associated with hot and cold weather, despite remaining mostly indoors. The study “Improving thermal environment of housing for older Australians” focused on assessing the relationships between the indoor environment, building characteristics, thermal comfort and perceive...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent years have shown an increasing number of studies on personal thermal comfort models as an alternative to the conventional approach to understanding thermal comfort in the built environment. Instead of basing on an average response from a large population, personalized models are designed to predict individuals' thermal comfort responses, usi...
Article
Full-text available
An important consideration for future age-friendly cities is that older people are able to live in housing appropriate for their needs. While thermal comfort in the home is vital for the health and well-being of older people, there are currently few guidelines about how to achieve this. This study is part of a research project that aims to improve...
Article
Full-text available
Background The public areas of the hospital built environment have hardly been investigated for their age-friendliness. Objective This exploratory, multidisciplinary pilot study investigates the relationship between the physical environment and design of hospital spaces and older people’s outpatient experience. Methods Sixteen participants were r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As people age, physiological changes affect their thermal perception, sensitivity and regulation. The ability to respond effectively to temperature fluctuations is compromised with physiological ageing, upsetting the homeostatic balance of health in some. As a result, older people can become vulnerable at extremes of thermal conditions in their env...
Poster
Full-text available
Dear Colleague, We would like to invite you to: Heat & Habitat in Cities Symposium Hosted by the School of Architecture and Built Environment, The University of Adelaide, the Heat & Habitat in Cities Symposium will bring together international and national experts, policymakers, planners and designers, to share their knowledge, experiences and exp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The worldwide demographic trend of an ageing society has important design implications for the built environment. Older people's individual differences and intrinsic capacities are very wide and undifferentiated consideration of this population is problematic, from both comfort and concomitant wellbeing perspectives. With respect to thermal comfort...
Article
Full-text available
In Australia, the vast majority of older people, those aged 65 years and over, want to live at their own homes for as long as possible. Older people are, however, vulnerable to extreme conditions, hot or cold, and therefore it is crucial to ensure that the home’s indoor environmental conditions are conducive to their health and well-being. The firs...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The worldwide demographic trend of an ageing society has important implications in the built environment. As the ageing population increases, designers are increasingly challenged to manage the diverse needs of older citizens so that health and quality of life are improved and independent living-or "ageing in place"-can be guaranteed. In this conte...
Thesis
Full-text available
Caminhar é o meio de transporte mais antigo, sustentável, saudável e econômico que existe. No entanto, muito mais que um meio de transporte, caminhar pela cidade é o melhor jeito de conhecê-la e construir o senso de comunidade urbana o qual tanto se almeja na atualidade. Neste trabalho, mira-se apontar políticas públicas unificadas que auxiliem a o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The rapid urban growth and the resulting impermeabilization of urban soil have caused great alterations in the drainage and retention of storm water. Overflows and massive ground failures are common problems for which traditional solutions appear, nowadays, unsuccessful. Thereby, it is well-known the urgency to create new and alternative strategies...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
The rapid urban growth and the resulting impermeabilization of urban soil have caused great alterations in the drainage and retention of storm water. Overflows and massive ground failures are common problems for which traditional solutions appear, nowadays, unsuccessful. Thereby, it is well-known the urgency to create new and alternative strategies to manage storm water. This paper presents the concept of green-infrastructure: a group of high-performance and strategic alternatives for storm water management, based on bio-retention principies and landscape design, to protect and improve urban hydrology, climate, and ecology. Studying the case of Praça Dolores lbarruri, an urban square located in Sao Paulo (Brazil), where a great variety of green-infrastructures typologies were inserted, his paper aimed to evaluate the efficiency of these strategies considering their capacity to retain and filtrate storm water run-off. First, it is presented a brief bibliographic review to conceptualize and understand the different types of green infra-structure (like biorretention swales, storm water planters, eco-roofs and vegetation infiltration basins), their techniques of insertion and their results in national and international examples. Furthermore, it is presented a brief review of the chosen case, considering its innovative approach and its construction details. The performance evaluation of the green-infrastructure typologies was based on visual analysis during field work and laboratorial results of experiments considering run-off velocity and water quality. After this evaluation, new propositions were made to resolve the main problems identified, considering other alternative solutions, like bioengineering and biotechnical stabilization methods. The results of this work proved the efficiency of this innovative typologies, which can be considered new initiatives of intelligent environmental conservation and strategies that aim at the social and ecological impacts of the rapid consumption and fragmentation of urban land. lt was also proved efficient the bioengineering and biotechnical stabilization techniques, strategies that contrai erosion and massive soil failure and that, like the green infrastructure typologies, combine conventional constructed systems with vegetated and live systems to diminish common problems in intense human intervention areas. Although these strategies have presented some limitations, they have been studied for the last few years and have presented national and international examples with great results.
Archived project
The worldwide demographic trend of an ageing society has important implications in the built environment. As the ageing population increases, designers are increasingly challenged to manage the diverse needs of older citizens so that wellbeing and quality of life are improved and independent living – or “ageing in place” - can be guaranteed. In this context, since older people’s individual differences are excessively wide, considering them as a single population in terms of thermal perception could result in leaving a significant number of older occupants in thermal discomfort inside their own dwellings. For this reason, this study aims to investigate thermal comfort of older people and thermal performance for older people’s dwellings on an individualized level, by developing occupant-centric and data-driven comfort models using machine learning algorithms, as opposed to the generalized static models traditionally used today. This approach seeks to enable design guidelines for older people’s built environment that respond directly to their needs, which could help decrease health-related vulnerability, enhance well-being, minimize reliance on heating and cooling, reduce energy use and ultimately help diminish potential fuel poverty.