Lara Pierce

Lara Pierce
Harvard Medical School | HMS · Division of Developmental Medicine/Children's Hospital Boston

Doctor of Philosophy

About

35
Publications
9,953
Reads
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835
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
512 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Attentional biases to threat‐related stimuli, such as fearful and angry facial expressions, are important to survival and emerge early in development. Infants demonstrate an attentional bias to fearful facial expressions by 5–7 months of age and an attentional bias toward anger by 3 years of age that are modulated by experiential factors. In a long...
Preprint
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Objective: To generate a cumulative early risk score for the perinatal maternal environment and examine the association of the maternal cumulative risk score with infant development and maternal and infant oxidative stress. Study Design: This was a two-center longitudinal study of mother-infant dyads born >36 weeks’ gestation. Maternal demographic...
Article
Full-text available
Event-Related Potential (ERP) designs are a common method for interrogating neurocognitive function with electroencephalography (EEG). However, the traditional method of preprocessing ERP data is manual-editing – a subjective, time-consuming processes. A number of automated pipelines have recently been created to address the need for standardizatio...
Article
The human brain develops through a complex interplay of genetic and environmental influences. During critical periods of development, experiences shape brain architecture, often with long-lasting effects. If experiences are adverse, the effects may include the risk of mental and physical disease, whereas positive environments may increase the likel...
Article
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Objective: The purpose of this study was to test associations between maternal stress, maternal mindset, and infant neurodevelopment at 12 months of age. Specifically, we sought to examine the extent to which maternal growth mindsets may serve to attenuate the negative associations between maternal stress and infants' neurodevelopment. Methods:...
Preprint
Full-text available
Event-Related Potential (ERP) designs are a common method for interrogating neurocognitive function with electroencephalography (EEG). However, the gold standard of preprocessing ERP data is manual-editing, a subjective, time-consuming processes. A number of automated pipelines have recently been created to address the need for standardization, aut...
Article
Exposure to high levels of early life stress have been associated with long-term difficulties in learning, behavior, and health, with particular impact evident in the language domain. While some have proposed that the increased stress of living in a low-income household mediates observed associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and child out...
Article
Associations have been observed between socioeconomic status (SES) and language outcomes from early childhood, but individual variability is high. Exposure to high levels of stress, often associated with low-SES status, might influence how parents and infants interact within the early language environment. Differences in these early language behavi...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: In this exploratory longitudinal study we assessed cognitive development in a community sample of infants born into predominantly low-income families from two different urban sites, to identify family and community factors that may associate with outcomes by 1 year of age. Method: Infant-mother dyads (n = 109) were recruited in Boston...
Article
Full-text available
Importance Variation in child responses to adversity creates a clinical challenge to identify children most resilient or susceptible to later risk for disturbances in cognition and health. Advances in establishing scalable biomarkers can lead to early identification and mechanistic understanding of the association of early adversity with neurodevel...
Chapter
This chapter discusses how the brain becomes specialized for supporting higher cognitive and language functions. We review behavioral milestones in several content areas, highlighting the interplay among them and their underlying neural foundations. We emphasize how the complex and lengthy process of brain development raises additional questions ab...
Article
In order to build complex language from perceptual input, children must have access to a powerful information processing system that can analyze, store, and use regularities in the signal to which the child is exposed. In this article, we propose that one of the most important parts of this underlying machinery is the linked set of cognitive and la...
Article
Language learning, while seemingly effortless for young learners, is a complex process involving many interacting pieces, both within the child and in their language-learning environments, which can result in unique language learning trajectories and outcomes. How does the brain adjust to or accommodate the myriad variations that occur during this...
Article
Full-text available
Early experiences may establish a foundation for later learning, however, influences of early language experience on later neural processing are unknown. We investigated whether maintenance of neural templates from early language experience influences subsequent language processing. Using fMRI, we scanned the following three groups performing a Fre...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Using functional MRI we examined the unconscious influence of early experience on later brain outcomes. Internationally adopted (IA) children (aged 9–17 years), who were completely separated from their birth language (Chinese) at 12.8 mo of age, on average, displayed brain activation to Chinese linguistic elements that precisely matche...
Article
Full-text available
The current study provides evidence that the absence of a syntactically expected item leads to a sustained cognitive processing demand. Event-related potentials were measured at the omission of a syntactically expected object argument in a speech sequence. English monolingual adults listened to paired sentences. The first sentence in the pair estab...
Article
Full-text available
Language use and joint attention (JA) strategies were examined during interactions between francophone mothers and fathers and either their birth children ( n = 10) or their internationally adopted children from China ( n = 8), once when the children were 15 months old and again at 20 months, on average. Results showed that mothers engaged in more...
Article
Given that all faces share the same set of features-two eyes, a nose, and a mouth-that are arranged in similar configuration, recognition of a specific face must depend on our ability to discern subtle differences in its featural and configural properties. An enduring question in the face-processing literature is whether featural or configural info...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Acquisition of English grammatical morphology was examined in five internationally adopted (IA) children from China (aged 0;10-1;1 at adoption) during the first three years' exposure to English to determine whether acquisition patterns were characteristic of child second language (L2) learners or monolingual first language (L1) learners. R...
Article
Full-text available
Studies employing event-related potentials have shown that when participants are monitoring for a novel target face, the presentation of their own face elicits an enhanced negative brain potential in posterior channels approximately 250 ms after stimulus onset. Here, we investigate whether the own face N250 effect generalizes to other highly famili...
Article
Previous studies have shown that the observer's own face elicits speeded responses in behavioral tasks and generates a pattern of brain activity that is differentiated from other familiar stimuli. Studies employing event-related potentials (ERPs) have shown that when participants are monitoring for a novel target face, the presentation of their own...
Article
All faces are created equal in the sense that each face shares the same set of features of two eyes, a nose and a mouth that are arranged in a similar configuration. Given their common parts and spatial layout, recognition of a specific face must therefore depend on our ability to discern subtle differences in the featural and configural properties...
Article
In a category learning task, people are initially unaware when they have committed an error and therefore, require corrective feedback to modify their category decisions. Once the categories are learned, however, external feedback is no longer necessary. Electrophysiologically, the two phases of category learning are indicated by different event-re...
Article
Although it is well established that people are better at recognizing own- versus other-race faces, the neural mechanisms mediating this advantage are not well understood. In this study, Caucasian participants were trained to differentiate African (or Hispanic) faces at the subordinate individual level and categorize Hispanic (or African) faces at...
Article
Full-text available
To elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying the development of perceptual expertise, we recorded ERPs while participants performed a categorization task. We found that as participants learned to discriminate computer generated "blob" stimuli, feedback modulated the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN)-an ERP component thought to reflec...
Article
Full-text available
Although it is well established that people are better at recognizing own-race faces than at recognizing other-race faces, the neural mechanisms mediating this advantage are not well understood. In this study, Caucasian participants were trained to differentiate African American (or Hispanic) faces at the individual level (e.g., Joe, Bob) and to ca...
Article
Full-text available
Implicit racial bias denotes socio-cognitive attitudes towards other-race groups that are exempt from conscious awareness. In parallel, other-race faces are more difficult to differentiate relative to own-race faces--the "Other-Race Effect." To examine the relationship between these two biases, we trained Caucasian subjects to better individuate ot...
Data
Full-text available
Written questionnaire completed by each subject prior to participating in the study. (0.03 MB PDF)

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