Lara Maister

Lara Maister
Bangor University · School of Psychology

PhD

About

29
Publications
10,243
Reads
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1,003
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
Birkbeck, University of London
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • MSc Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychology
January 2017 - present
Birkbeck, University of London
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2016 - present
The Warburg Institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Significance The capacity to sense interoceptive signals is thought to be fundamental to broad functions including, but not limited to, homeostasis and the experience of the self. While neuroanatomical evidence suggests that nonhuman animals—namely, nonhuman primates—may possess features necessary for interoceptive processing in a way that is simil...
Article
Full-text available
Is there a way to visually depict the image people “see” of themselves in their minds’ eyes? And if so, what can these mental images tell us about ourselves? We used a computational reverse-correlation technique to explore individuals’ mental “self-portraits” of their faces and body shapes in an unbiased, data-driven way (total N = 116 adults). Sel...
Article
Full-text available
Erogenous zones of the body are sexually arousing when touched. Previous investigations of erogenous zones were restricted to the effects of touch on one’s own body. However, sexual interactions do not just involve being touched, but also involve touching a partner and mutually looking at each other’s bodies. We take a novel interpersonal approach...
Article
Full-text available
The possibility of being invisible has long fascinated people. Recent research showed that multisensory illusions can induce experiences of bodily invisibility, allowing the psychological consequences of invisibility to be explored. Here, we demonstrate an illusion of embodying an invisible face. Participants received touches on their face and simu...
Article
Full-text available
Adults experience greater self-other bodily overlap in romantic than platonic relationships. One of the closest relationships is between mother and infant, yet little is known about their mutual bodily representations. This study measured infants' sensitivity to bodily overlap with their mother. Twenty-one 6- to 8-month-olds watched their mother's...
Preprint
How do we ‘see’ ourselves in our mind’s eye? The question of how we represent our self has been at the centre of cultural practices across centuries, as the long tradition of self-portraits attests, and at the centre of our understanding of mental health issues such as body-image disorders. By implementing a reverse-correlation technique to measure...
Preprint
Several areas of the body, known as ‘erogenous zones’, are able to elicit sexual arousal in the absence of direct genital stimulation. Previous scientific investigations of these erogenous zones have been restricted to the effects of tactile stimulation of one’s own body. However, human sexual interactions are interpersonal and multimodal, involvin...
Article
Full-text available
The self is one the most important concepts in social cognition and plays a crucial role in determining questions such as which social groups we view ourselves as belonging to and how we relate to others. In the past decade, the self has also become an important topic within cognitive neuroscience with an explosion in the number of studies seeking...
Article
Humans form close intimate relationships with others. Social psychologists have shown that the way in which we process social information from intimate partners is very different to that from strangers and acquaintances. We review recent evidence suggesting that within close relationships, there is overlap between representations of oneself and one...
Data
Mean looking times (ms) for individual infants for synchronous, asynchronous-faster, asynchronous-slower and (composite) asynchronous trials.Data used for Figure 1B and Figure 1—figure supplement 1.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25318.004
Data
Cardiac discrimination scores presented for each infant, alongside mean HEP amplitude from the parietal cluster (POz, Pz, P2) in μV.Data used for Figure 2B.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25318.008
Article
Full-text available
Interoception, the sensitivity to visceral sensations, plays an important role in homeostasis and guiding motivated behaviour. It is also considered to be fundamental to self-awareness. Despite its importance, the developmental origins of interoceptive sensitivity remain unexplored. We here provide the first evidence for implicit, flexible interoce...
Article
Full-text available
The integration of external and internal bodily signals provides a coherent, multisensory experience of one’s own body. The ability to accurately detect internal bodily sensations is referred to as interoceptive accuracy (IAcc). Previous studies found that IAcc can be increased when people with low IAcc engage in self-processing such as when lookin...
Article
Full-text available
Our relationships with romantic partners are often some of the closest and most important relationships that we experience in our adult lives. Interpersonal closeness in romantic relationships is characterised by an increased overlap between cognitive representations of oneself and one's partner. Importantly, this type of self-other overlap also oc...
Article
The mental representation of the self is a complex construct, comprising both conceptual information, and perceptual information regarding the body. Evidence suggests that both the conceptual self-representation and the bodily self-representation are malleable, and that these different aspects of the self are linked. Changes in bodily self-represen...
Article
Full-text available
Humphreys and Sui provide a powerful theoretical framework to explain processing biases toward self-related information. However, the framework is primarily applied to information relevant to a conceptual self-representation. Here, we show a similar processing bias for information related to the bodily self, grounded in sensorimotor representations...
Article
Full-text available
Interoception, defined as afferent information arising from within the body, is the basis of all emotional experience and underpins the 'self.' However, people vary in the extent to which interoceptive signals reach awareness. This trait modulates both their experience of emotion and their ability to distinguish 'self' from 'other' in multisensory...
Article
For full text go to http://pure.rhul.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/changing-bodies-changes-minds%28dce786cc-fbd7-4141-ae3a-95ba9bfde276%29.html Research on stereotypes demonstrates how existing prejudice affects the way we process outgroups. Recent studies have considered whether it is possible to change our implicit social bias by experimentally c...
Article
Full-text available
Our perceptual systems integrate multisensory information about objects that are close to our bodies, which allow us to respond quickly and appropriately to potential threats, as well as act upon and manipulate useful tools. Intriguingly, the representation of this area close to our body, known as the multisensory ‘peripersonal space’ (PPS), can ex...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of multisensory-induced changes on body-ownership and self-awareness using bodily illusions has been well established. More recently, experimental manipulation of bodily illusions have been combined with social cognition tasks to investigate whether changes in body-ownership can in turn change the way we perceive others. For example, exp...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Long-term memory functioning in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is marked by a characteristic pattern of impairments and strengths. Individuals with ASD show impairment in memory tasks that require the processing of relational and contextual information, but spared performance on tasks requiring more item-based, acontextual processing....
Article
Previous studies have investigated how existing social attitudes towards other races affect the way we ‘share’ their bodily experiences, for example in empathy for pain, and sensorimotor mapping. Here, we ask whether it is possible to alter implicit racial attitudes by experimentally increasing self-other bodily overlap. Employing a bodily illusion...
Article
Full-text available
Body-awareness is produced by an integration of both interoceptive and exteroceptive bodily signals. However, previous investigations into cultural differences in bodily self-awareness have only studied these two aspects in isolation. We investigated the interaction between interoceptive and exteroceptive self-processing in East Asian and Western p...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals with Mirror-Touch Synaesthesia (MTS) experience touch on their own bodies when observing another person being touched. Whilst somatosensory processing in MTS has been extensively investigated, the extent to which the remapping of observed touch on the synaesthete's body can also lead to changes in the mental representation of the self r...
Article
Full-text available
Embodied simulation accounts of emotion recognition claim that we vicariously activate somatosensory representations to simulate, and eventually understand, how others feel. Interestingly, mirror-touch synesthetes, who experience touch when observing others being touched, show both enhanced somatosensory simulation and superior recognition of emoti...
Article
Timing is essential for the development of cognitive skills known to be impaired in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), such as social cognition and episodic memory abilities. Despite the proposal that timing impairments may underpin core features of ASC, few studies have examined temporal processing in ASC and they have produced conflicting results....
Conference Paper
Background: The study of memory functioning in ASC reveals a complex pattern of strengths and impairments, and many mixed findings. However recent studies have begun to converge on some recurring themes. Firstly, findings suggest individuals with ASC seem not to utilise semantic information to aid their recall in the same way as neurotypical indivi...
Conference Paper
Background: Recent research has suggested individuals with ASC have a specific episodic memory deficit with preserved semantic memory functioning. Cognitive capacities such as self-awareness and subjective time perception are considered to play important roles in episodic memory. Studies have shown abnormalities in both these areas in ASC (e.g. Hur...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
I have a set of 77 different stimuli, that have each been rated on 10 likert questions. The ratings on these questions can be aggregated to produce scores on 5 different subscales. So, I have 5 scores for each of the 77 stimuli from each rater, and I would like to report the inter-rater reliability of each score when averaged across raters.
However, I am struggling to identify the correct reliability measure, because the 77 stimuli haven't all been scored by the same raters. The 77 stimuli have been split into four batches (of 18, 19, 20 and 20), and each has been scored by a different group and number of raters (N=26, 26, 30, 30 respectively). This appears to rule out some straightforward measures. Is there a measure that would be suitable? Or should I calculate inter-rater reliability separately for each of the four 'batches' of stimuli then average them together?
Question
I need some small, dynamic and attractive stimuli to bring attention to the center of the screen for a preferential looking/ eyetracking study. Does anyone know what works the best, including sounds etc.? I have seen others use small colourful GIFs (e.g. a wiggling animal character, or spinning toy) - any tried and tested ones that are available would be great!
Question
I am planning some facial EMG studies measuring facial mimicry, and it has been found that dynamic stimuli (videos of faces going from neutral to the full emotion) elicit a larger mimicry effect than still images. However, attempts to record my own from a student population have not been very sucessful, and I feel that videos created from morphing a still neutral face gradually into an emotional face don't give realistic results.

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