Lara Bardi

Lara Bardi
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Institut des sciences cognitives

PhD

About

49
Publications
16,355
Reads
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984
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
CNRS, Lyon, France
Position
  • Researcher
April 2018 - December 2018
Università degli Studi di Trento
Position
  • Researcher
January 2016 - October 2018
Ghent University
Position
  • Doctor Assistant
Education
September 2005 - July 2007
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Neuroscience
September 2001 - May 2005
University of Florence
Field of study
  • Experimental Psychology

Publications

Publications (49)
Preprint
Full-text available
In this review, we propose that interpersonal bodily interactions represent a fertile ground in which the bodily and psychological self is developed, gradually allowing for forms of more abstract and disembodied interactions. We start by focusing on how early infant-caregiver bodily interactions, mediated by the sense of touch, play a crucial role...
Article
Full-text available
The dorso-posterior parietal cortex (DPPC) is a major node of the grasp/manipulation control network. It is assumed to act as an optimal forward estimator that continuously integrates efferent outflows and afferent inflows to modulate the ongoing motor command. In agreement with this view, a recent per-operative study, in humans, identified functio...
Article
Full-text available
Theory of Mind (ToM) or mentalizing refers to the ability to attribute mental states (such as desires, beliefs or intentions) to oneself or others. ToM has been argued to operate in an explicit and an implicit or a spontaneous way. In their influential paper, Kovács et al. (Science 330:1830–1834, 2010) introduced an adapted false belief task—a ball...
Article
Previous behavioral studies using stimulus-response compatibility tasks have shown that people are faster to carry out instructed approach/avoidance responses to positive/negative stimuli. This result has been taken as evidence that positive/negative stimulus valence directly activates a tendency to approach/avoid, which in turn, facilitates execut...
Article
Full-text available
Early studies on long-term functional recovery after motor and premotor lesions showed better outcomes in younger than older monkeys. This finding led to the widespread belief that brain injuries cause less impairment in children than adults. However, this view has limitations and a large body of evidence now indicates that cerebral damages can be...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous behavioral studies using stimulus-response compatibility tasks have shown that people are faster to carry out instructed approach/avoidance responses to positive/negative stimuli. This result has been taken as evidence that positive/negative stimulus valence directly activates a tendency to approach/avoid, which in turn, facilitates execut...
Article
Full-text available
Theory of Mind research has shown that we spontaneously take into account other's beliefs. In the current study we investigate, with a spontaneous Theory of Mind (ToM) task, if this belief representation also applies to nonhuman-like agents. In a series of 3 experiments, we show here that we do not spontaneously take into account beliefs of nonhuma...
Article
The present review includes transcranial magnetic and transcranial electric stimulation studies on time perception and shows that the neural processing of time requires the activity of wide range-distributed brain networks. Moreover, a critical discussion regarding non-invasive brain stimulation in the study of time processing is included to give t...
Article
The preparation of an action is accompanied by transient corticospinal (CS) excitability changes. Motivation can modulate these changes. Specifically, when a cue indicates that a reward can be obtained, CS excitability initially increases, followed by a pronounced decrease. This dynamic could reflect processes related to reward expectancy, processe...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines two contrasting explanations for early tendencies to fight and flee. According to a stimulus-driven explanation, goal-incompatible stimuli that are easy/difficult to control lead to the tendency to fight/flee. According to a goal-directed explanation, on the other hand, the tendency to fight/flee occurs when the expected utility...
Preprint
There is a major debate in the theory of mind (ToM) field, concerning whether spontaneous and explicit ToM are based on the same or two distinct cognitive systems. While there is extensive research on the neural correlates of explicit ToM, revealing consistent activation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), fe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individuals high in psychopathic traits are known for manipulating others, while having at the same time a lack of empathy. An open question is whether the lack of empathy leads them to represent other persons’ beliefs and actions less strongly or whether their manipulative character leads them to represent other persons’ beliefs and actions more s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individuals high in psychopathic traits are known for manipulating others, while having at the same time a lack of empathy. An open question is whether the lack of empathy leads them to represent other persons’ beliefs and actions less strongly or whether their manipulative character leads them to represent other persons’ beliefs and actions more s...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines two contrasting explanations for early tendencies to fight and flee. According to a stimulus-driven explanation, goal-incompatible stimuli that are easy/difficult to control lead to the tendency to fight/flee. According to a goal-directed explanation, on the other hand, the tendency to fight/flee occurs when the expected utility...
Article
Full-text available
Past research on action observation and imitation suggests that observing a movement activates a corresponding motor representation in the observer. However, recent research suggests that individuals may not only reflexively simulate the observed behavior but also simulate and engage in anticipated action without another person actually engaging in...
Article
Full-text available
Automatic imitation is the finding that movement execution is facilitated by compatible and impeded by incompatible observed movements. In the past 15 years, automatic imitation has been studied to understand the relation between perception and action in social interaction. Although research on this topic started in cognitive science, interest quic...
Article
Full-text available
The socio-communicative difficulties of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are hypothesized to be caused by a specific deficit in the ability to represent one’s own and others’ mental states, referred to as Theory of Mind or mentalizing. However, many individuals with ASD show successful performance on explicit measures of mentalizing,...
Article
Full-text available
A recent debate about Theory of Mind (ToM) concerns whether spontaneous and explicit mentalizing are based on the same mechanisms. However, only a few neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of spontaneous ToM, with inconsistent results. The present study had two goals: first, to investigate whether the right Temporo-Parietal Juncti...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely known that individuals have a tendency to imitate each other. However, different psychological disciplines assess imitation in different manners. While social psychologists assess mimicry by means of action observation, cognitive psychologists assess automatic imitation with reaction time based measures on a trial-by-trial basis. Altho...
Article
The concept of stimulus response compatibility (SRC) refers to the existence of a privileged association between a specific stimulus feature and a specific response feature. Two examples of SRC are the Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) and the Markedness Association of Response Codes (MARC) effects. According to the polarity c...
Article
Full-text available
When we have to judge the distance between another person and an object (social condition), we judge this distance as being smaller compared to judging the distance between two objects (nonsocial condition). It has been suggested that this compression is mediated by the attribution of a motor potential to the reference frame (other person vs. objec...
Article
Re­cent re­sults have shown that the way we cat­e­go­rize space varies as a func­tion of the frame of ref­er­ence. If the ref­er­ence frame (RF) is an­other per­son vs. an ob­ject, the dis­tance is judged as re­duced. It has been sug­gested that such an ef­fect is due to the spon­ta­neous pro­cess­ing of the other's mo­tor po­ten­tial­i­ties. To in...
Article
There is extensive evidence that perceived and internally planned actions have a common representational basis: action observation can induce an automatic tendency to imitate others. If perceived and executed action, however, are based on shared representations, the question arises how we can distinguish self-related and other-related representatio...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of mentalizing has been widely studied, but almost exclusively through tasks with explicit instructions. Recent studies suggest that people also mentalize on a more implicit level. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has directly contrasted the effects of implicit and explicit mentalizing processes on an implicit dependent measu...
Data
Debriefing Form (translated from Dutch). (DOCX)
Article
There is extensive discussion on whether spontaneous and explicit forms of ToM are based on the same cognitive/neural mechanisms or rather reflect qualitatively different processes. For the first time, we analyzed the BOLD signal for false belief processing by directly comparing spontaneous and explicit task versions. In both versions, participants...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of observing pain and touch in others upon vicarious somatosensory experiences and the detection of subtle somatosensory stimuli. Furthermore, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was used to assess the role of the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ), as this brain region has been suggested to be invo...
Article
Full-text available
Embodied cognition postulates that perceptual and motor processes serve higher-order cognitive faculties like language. A major challenge for embodied cognition concerns the grounding of abstract concepts. Here we zoom in on abstract spatial concepts and ask the question to what extent the sensorimotor system is involved in processing these. Most o...
Article
Full-text available
Theory of mind (ToM) research has shown that adults with high functioning autism (HFA) demonstrate typical performance on tasks that require explicit belief reasoning, despite clear social difficulties in everyday life situations. In the current study, we used implicit belief manipulations that are task-irrelevant and therefore less susceptible to...
Article
Full-text available
The observation of an action leads to the activation of the corresponding motor plan in the observer. This phenomenon of motor resonance has an important role in social interaction, promoting imitation, learning and action understanding. However, mirror responses not always have a positive impact on our behavior. An automatic tendency to imitate ot...
Article
Full-text available
Embodied cognition postulates that perceptual and motor processes serve higher-order cognitive faculties like language. A major challenge for embodied cognition concerns the grounding of abstract concepts. Here we zoom in on abstract spatial concepts and ask the question to what extent the sensorimotor system is involved in processing these. Most o...
Article
In choice reaction tasks, subjects typically respond faster when the relative spatial positions of stimulus and response correspond than when they do not, even when spatial information is irrelevant to the task (e.g. in the Simon task). Cognitive models attribute the Simon effect to automatic response activation elicited by spatial information, whi...
Poster
Full-text available
By adopting a central cue paradigm (Posner, 1980) previous studies demonstrated that the walking direction of an upright point-light biological motion display modulates exogenous shifts of attention both in adults (Shi et al., 2010) and in 6-month-old infants (Bardi et al., 2015). To investigate the respective roles of global form and local motion...
Article
Full-text available
Recent results suggest that the perception of extrapersonal space might be filtered not only by our own motion potentialities but also by the motor potentialities of others. We investigated whether the simulation of a walking action shapes our extrapersonal space perception. In three experiments we took advantage of biological motion displays as pr...
Article
Full-text available
Inversion effect in biological motion perception has been recently attributed to an innate sensitivity of the visual system to the gravity-dependent dynamic of the motion. However, the specific cues that determine the inversion effect in naïve subjects were never investigated. In the present study, we have assessed the contribution of the local gra...
Chapter
The present chapter deals with the role of innate predispositions and experience in the origin of sensitivity to social agents, causal relations, and animacy. Experimental evidence will be reviewed to demonstrate that, from birth, motion is the most informative perceptual cue human and nonhuman animals use to identify living objects. The data highl...
Article
Full-text available
In the Simon task, a conflict arises because irrelevant spatial information competes for response selection either facilitating or interfering with performance. Responses are faster when stimulus and response position correspond than when they do not. The FEFs, which have long been characterized for their role in oculomotor control, are also involv...
Article
Full-text available
There are several lines of evidence which suggests that, since birth, the human system detects social agents on the basis of at least two properties: the presence of a face and the way they move. This chapter reviews the infant research on the origin of brain specialization for social stimuli and on the role of innate mechanisms and perceptual expe...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have reported that patients with end-stage heart disease can have cognitive deficits ranging from mild to severe. Little is known, however, about the relationship between cognitive performance, neurophysiological characteristics and relevant clinical and instrumental indexes for an extensive evaluation of patients with heart failure,...
Article
Orienting and motor attention are known to recruit different regions within right and left parietal lobes. However, the time course and the role played by these modules when visual information competes for different motor response are still unknown. To deal with this issue, single-pulse TMS was applied over the angular (AG) and the supramarginal (S...
Article
The present study addresses the hypothesis that detection of biological motion is an intrinsic capacity of the visual system guided by a non-species-specific predisposition for the pattern of vertebrate movement and investigates the role of global vs. local information in biological motion detection. Two-day-old babies exposed to a biological motio...
Article
Full-text available
Holistic face processing was investigated in newborns, 3-month-old infants, and adults through a modified version of the composite face paradigm and the recording of eye movements. After familiarization to the top portion of a face, participants (N = 70) were shown 2 aligned or misaligned faces, 1 of which comprised the familiar top part. In the al...

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
peripersonal space
Archived project
To provide a first direct measure of the reward-imitation interaction while creating a paradigm that can be used to address other questions related to the social processing of reward. Reward modulations are a useful tool to understand the underlying and driving cognitive mechanisms of our behavior. However, surprisingly little is known about the unraveling of reward processing in a social context. One way to address this shortage is to look how reward affects social aspects. Believed to hold a role in forming an understanding of the others actions and intentions is the automatic social phenomenon of (motor) imitation. While there are many reports on the interaction of imitation and reward, the phenomenon is yet to be addressed directly in the reward literature.
Project
Our lab is currently looking into ways to improve the quality of fNIRS data. One way of doing this is to remove systemic noise from the signal. At present, we use the algorithmic approach. However, the performance of this approach seems to depend on the actual dataset, i.e. sometimes it successfully reduces systemic noise, sometimes it does not. An alternative method to deal with systemic noise is to measure it using short-distance channels and regress it out of the signal of interest. We now want to test out this method using a cap with short-channel capability. Specifically, we intend to acquire fNIRS data from frontal and parietal regions during three different tasks: 1. Motor task 2. Word generation task to localize Broca’s region 3. Theory of mind task to localize TPJ In addition, we are interested in the test-retest reliability of fNIRS, again with and without the use of short-separation channel regression.