Ladd Keith

Ladd Keith
The University of Arizona | UA · School of Landscape Architecture and Planning

Doctor of Philosophy
Assistant Professor of Planning

About

25
Publications
4,934
Reads
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47
Citations
Introduction
Ladd Keith, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Landscape Architecture and Planning at The University of Arizona. An urban planner by training, he has over a decade of experience planning for climate change with diverse stakeholders in cities across the U.S. His current research explores heat planning and governance with funding from NOAA, CDC, and DOT.
Education
January 2013 - May 2019
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Arid Lands Resource Sciences
August 2003 - May 2005
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Planning
August 1999 - May 2003
The University of Arizona
Field of study
  • Media Arts

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Extreme heat is a growing concern for cities, with both climate change and the urban heat island (UHI) effect increasingly impacting public health, economies, urban infrastructure, and urban ecology. To better understand the current state of planning for extreme heat, we conducted a systematic literature review. We found that most of the research f...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme heat is an increasing climate risk due to climate change and the urban heat island (UHI) effect and can jeopardize points of dispensing (PODs) for COVID-19 vaccination distribution and broader public health emergency preparedness (PHEP) response operations. These PODs were often located on large parking lot sites with high heat severity and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Problem, Research Strategy, and Findings: Extreme heat is the deadliest climate hazard in the United States. Climate change and the urban heat island effect are increasing the number of dangerously hot days in cities worldwide and the need for communities to plan for extreme heat. Existing literature on heat planning focuses on heat island mapping...
Article
Full-text available
Cities need heat governance to plan for extreme temperatures and protect those most at risk. Cities need heat governance to plan for extreme temperatures and protect those most at risk.
Book
Full-text available
Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States. As average global temperatures continue to rise, the threats of both extreme heat events and chronic heat are projected to increase. Heat disproportionately affects marginalized residents and those who face systematic inequities such as workplace safety, housing quality, energy af...
Article
Full-text available
Green stormwater infrastructure provides environmental, economic, and health benefits as a strategy for building resilience against climate change impacts. However, it may inadvertently increase vulnerability due to improper design and construction or lack of maintenance. We engaged city stakeholders and a diverse student group to investigate possi...
Article
Extreme heat is the deadliest climate hazard in the United States. Climate change and the urban heat island effect are increasing the number of dangerously hot days in cities worldwide and the need for communities to plan for extreme heat. Existing literature on heat planning focuses on heat island mapping and modeling, whereas few studies delve in...
Article
Full-text available
A central tenant in minimizing personal heat exposure is that context matters. In our article reporting on personal heat exposure in outdoor COVID-19 vaccination sites in Arizona, USA during spring 2021, we emphasized that heat mitigation strategies are highly specific to the underlying climatological and site design contexts. The Mungmunpuntipanti...
Technical Report
Heat is the deadliest weather-related hazard in the United States, posing a growing and inequitable threat to human health, infrastructure, and economic and ecological systems. Communities are getting hotter due to climate change and the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Cities across the country must prepare for unprecedented heat and address system...
Technical Report
Full-text available
About a year after a tornado left a path of destruction across northern Dallas, the city asked ULI to convene a virtual Advisory Services panel (vASP) focusing on the area around the Walnut Hill/Denton Drive Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) station on the western edge of the tornado’s path. The panel was asked to provide recommendations on how to f...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic amplifies health risks for many people in hot weather. To reduce heat-related illness and loss of life authorities and communities should prepare for hot weather and heatwaves — in addition to managing COVID-19 — before extreme heat strikes.
Technical Report
Full-text available
The earth’s climate is changing. Global average temperatures have risen 1.8° F since 1901. Warming temperatures are driving other environmental changes such as melting glaciers, rising sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, and increased drought and wildfires.The magnitude of future changes will depend on the amount of greenhouse gases (GHG...
Article
Full-text available
Stakeholder participation at the intersection of climate and health is essential to assess and plan for the human health impacts of current and projected climate-sensitive hazards. Using the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) Coalition on Climate Change and Public Health workgroup and the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMA...
Poster
Full-text available
This research aims to study the thermal comfort of pedestrians in several multi-modal corridors within the City of Tucson to document ambient and radiant temperatures of different multi-modal corridor typologies and to understand the effect of heat stress on pedestrian mobility patterns. Corridors will be selected based on interviews with local urb...
Poster
Full-text available
At a middle school in Tucson, Arizona, students point to their feet and exclaim that they can feel the heat through their shoes when they have to walk across the black asphalt courtyard to reach their playground. They are experiencing the phenomena of extreme heat. This observable event begins a path of learning for the students that has real-world...
Technical Report
Full-text available
While urban heat island (UHI) mapping and modeling have become more sophisticated in recent years, there is still an information gap between the UHI maps and models, urban planning and design strategies to decrease heat, and the use of that information in policy decision making. Our study focuses on documenting the current use of UHI maps and model...
Technical Report
The Pueblo of Laguna, a federally recognized tribe, seeks to enhance its resilience to changing climate conditions and extreme weather events and their associated impacts. Through adaptation planning, the Pueblo wishes to reduce the ways that extreme heat, drought, heavy rainfall and other extreme precipitation, extreme winds, and associated events...
Technical Report
Full-text available
As a part of Miami’s efforts to be at the forefront of resilience planning, the City of Miami and the Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA), the sponsors, asked the Urban Land Institute to conduct an Advisory Services Panel to provide strategic recommendations on design guidelines, funding opportunities, policy approaches, and an implementatio...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Climate change adaptation planning is the process of planning to adjust to new or changing environments in ways that reduce negative effects and take advantage of beneficial opportunities. Climate change adaptation strategies can be integrated into existing community plans, such as landscape or infrastructure management plans or can be stand-alone...
Technical Report
Full-text available
ULI Advisory Service panel was asked to provide strategic advice and recommendations for the City of Jacksonville and the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) on the following four key objectives and goals: economic development opportunities, regulatory goals and policy, land use and market-based development, and implementation. These object...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The earth’s climate is changing. Global average temperatures have risen 1.8°F since 1901 (Wuebbles et al. 2017). Warming temperatures are driving other environmental changes such as melting glaciers, rising sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, and increased drought and wildfires. The magnitude of future changes will depend on the amount o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
ULI members developed Ten Principles for Building Resilience through a 2017 workshop that analyzed the findings of the Institute’s ten resilience-focused Advisory Services panels, as well as other resilience-focused projects led by the Urban Resilience program and ULI district councils. The goal of the workshop was to determine the key themes of UL...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The ULI Resilience Advisory Services Panel in El Paso studied how the region’s proposed new Active Transportation System can serve as a model for resilience by taking a holistic approach to environmental planning, land use, open space, housing development strategy and civic engagement. The City of El Paso faces challenges such as flash flooding, d...
Technical Report
Full-text available
St. Tammany Parish has spent considerable time developing a philosophy on resilience. Many grant opportunities have emerged because of multiple storm-related events that affected both the parish and the larger region. Those grant opportunities as well as other funding have provided the parish with the ability to study extensively its south central...

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Projects

Projects (9)
Project
We will set up a comprehensive evaluation framework of cool pavements and other cool corridor strategies. We are extending methodologies used in other settings to capture how a cool corridor strategy influences surface temperature on the road and pedestrian facilities, ambient air temperatures on and near the road, and personal heat exposure. In addition to providing an evaluation of the City of Tucson’s cool pavement coating pilot, the project will also guide the city and other municipalities in future cool corridor heat resilience strategies. The results will provide an important foundation for future work in understanding how the changing climate may impact human-scale transportation, including modal shifts and physical activity-based public health outcomes.
Project
While many states and local governments are developing strategies to address urban heat, there is little collaboration within communities. The lack of coordination on urban heat resilience can result in ineffective heat mitigation, or worse, contribute to urban heat in areas of highest risk. To help bridge these disparate efforts, University of Arizona researchers are leading an effort called Plan Integration for Resilience Scorecard for Heat, or PIRSH. The team’s research will build from a method recently adopted by the American Planning Association (APA) as a national standard and resource for building local capacity to integrate resilience planning across sectors, which has been successfully applied to flood planning. PIRSH will help communities systematically evaluate their current heat mitigation strategies across relevant plans, compare the combined effect of those strategies with heat risk data (including data from NOAA’s community-led urban heat mapping campaigns), and identify opportunities for improved planning. This will help communities bring together traditionally siloed disciplines and align their urban heat resilience efforts to reduce the negative health, economic, and environmental impacts of heat. PIRSH has been piloted in Tucson, Arizona and will now be expanded to five other geographically distinct U.S. cities: Baltimore, Boston, Fort Lauderdale, Houston and Seattle. Ultimately, the team will work with APA to disseminate the PIRSH methodology to over 46,000 APA members across the U.S. and beyond.
Project
To provide Pima County Office of Emergency Management and Risk Management Division, the University of Arizona, and Tucson Medical Center with information to improve heat-health decision-making at the outdoor COVID-19 vaccination sites, we will collect wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and surface temperatures in a quasi-experimental design at three Point of Distribution (POD) sites. We will measure how WBGT changes at several key locations in each site such as intake and observation areas with no shade, tent shade, tent shade with vehicles, tent shade with cooling, and waiting areas for walk-in vaccinations. Our analysis will control for the reported regional ambient air temperature to approximate changing weather, time of day, and applicability for real-world decision making. We will also take surface temperatures to understand the differentials in radiant temperature from the ground and vehicles in different situations. Data collection will be managed by research team leads and utilize student volunteers from the university's Student Aid for Field Epidemiology Response (SAFER) program.