Lacy D. Chick

Lacy D. Chick
Hawken School · Science

PhD

About

32
Publications
4,283
Reads
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697
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
663 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Introduction
Lacy D. Chick currently works as a science teacher and is the Co-Director of the STEMM Program at Hawken School. Lacy does research in ecology and evolutionary biology.
Additional affiliations
August 2010 - December 2015
University of Tennessee
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2007 - August 2010
Middle Tennessee State University
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2002 - May 2006
Francis Marion University
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
The increase in species diversity from temperate to tropical regions is one of the most widespread patterns in biogeography. As humans continue to drastically modify natural habitats, land‐use changes such as the development of cities could potentially alter typical latitudinal diversity gradients. Cities could depress or enhance biodiversity throu...
Article
Full-text available
Urban‐driven evolution is widely evident, but whether these changes confer fitness benefits and thus represent adaptive urban evolution is less clear. We performed a multi‐year field reciprocal transplant experiment of acorn‐dwelling ants across urban and rural environments. Fitness responses were consistent with local adaptation: we found a surviv...
Article
Full-text available
Metabolic rates of ectotherms are expected to increase with global trends of climatic warming. But the potential for rapid, compensatory evolution of lower metabolic rate in response to rising temperatures is only starting to be explored. Here, we explored rapid evolution of metabolic rate and locomotor performance in acorn‐dwelling ants (Temnothor...
Article
Full-text available
A fundamental tenet of biogeography is that abiotic and biotic factors interact to shape the distributions of species and the organization of communities, with interactions being more important in benign environments, and environmental filtering more important in stressful environments. This pattern is often inferred using large databases or phylog...
Preprint
Full-text available
Urban-driven evolution is widely evident, but whether these changes confer fitness benefits and thus represent cases of adaptive urban evolution is less clear. We performed a multi-year field reciprocal transplant experiment of acorn-dwelling ants across urban and rural environments. Fitness trade-offs via survival were consistent with local adapta...
Article
Full-text available
A successful invasion of novel habitat requires that non-native organisms overcome native abiotic and biotic resistance. Non-native species can overcome abiotic resistance if they arrive with traits well-suited for the invaded habitat or if they can rapidly acclimate or adapt. Non-native species may co-exist with native species if they require nove...
Article
Environmental temperature can alter body size and thermal tolerance, yet the effects of temperature rise on the size-tolerance relationship remain unclear. Terrestrial ectotherms with larger body sizes typically exhibit greater tolerance of high (and low) temperatures. However, while warming tends to increase tolerance of high temperatures through...
Article
Full-text available
Although studies increasingly disentangle phenotypic plasticity from evolutionary responses to environmental change, few test for transgenerational plasticity in this context. Here, we evaluate if phenotypic divergence of acorn ants in response to urbanization is driven by transgenerational plasticity rather than evolution. F2 generation worker ant...
Preprint
Full-text available
Disentangling the mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in response to environmental change is critical, and although studies increasingly disentangle phenotypic plasticity from evolutionary change, few explore the potential role for transgenerational plasticity in this context. Here, we evaluate the potential role that transgenerational plasticity plays...
Article
For many species, the timing of life cycle events is advancing under contemporary global climate change. However, much less is known regarding phenological shifts as a result of other sources of anthropogenic change, such as urban warming. In both cases, progress has been hampered by a focus on phenological traits such as the timing of emergence, r...
Article
The question of parallel evolution-what causes it, and how common it is-has long captured the interest of evolutionary biologists. Widespread urban development over the last century has driven rapid evolutionary responses on contemporary time scales, presenting a unique opportunity to test the predictability and parallelism of evolutionary change....
Article
Full-text available
Because cities contain high levels of impervious surfaces and diminished buffering effects of vegetation cover, urbanized environments can warm faster over the day and exhibit more rapid warming over space due to greater thermal heterogeneity in these environments. Whether organismal physiologies can adapt to these more rapid spatio-temporal change...
Article
Full-text available
Species may exhibit similar traits via different mechanisms: environmental filtering and local adaptation (geography) and shared evolutionary history (phylogeny) can each contribute to the resemblance of traits among species. Parsing trait variation into geographic and phylogenetic sources is important, as each suggests different constraints on tra...
Article
Synopsis: Few studies have quantified the relative importance of direct effects of climate change on communities versus indirect effects that are mediated thorough species interactions, and the limited evidence is conflicting. Trait-based approaches have been popular in studies of climate change, but can they be used to estimate direct versus indi...
Article
Full-text available
Lack of food is one of the most common natural stressors that animals face, yet the physiological response to food restriction in most nonmammalian species is poorly understood. Food restriction can elicit an elevation of plasma glucocorticoid hormones and changes in blood metabolites in several vertebrates, but this has not been shown in snakes, d...
Article
Rates of urbanization are accelerating worldwide. The increases in temperature associated with ‘urban heat island’ effects provide both an ecological imperative and a unique opportunity to explore the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that underlie organismal responses to rapid environmental change. We used the acorn ant, Temnothorax curvispin...
Chapter
Full-text available
Ants are probably the most dominant insect family on earth, and flowering plants have been the dominant plant group on land for more than 100 million years. In recent decades, human activities have degraded natural environments with unparalleled speed and scale, making it increasingly apparent that interspecific interactions vary not only under dif...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years the focus in ecology has shifted from species to a greater emphasis on functional traits. In tandem with this shift, a number of trait databases have been developed covering a range of taxa. Here, we introduce the GlobalAnts database. Globally, ants are dominant, diverse and provide a range of ecosystem functions. The database repre...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change prompts warm-tolerant species upward and poleward to either displace or replace cold-tolerant species. Warm-tolerant species may replace cold-tolerant individuals with upward migration, or cold-tolerant genes if the species hybridize. We examined genetic and morphological differences between low elevation, warm-tolerant (Aphaenogaste...
Article
Full-text available
Background The distributions of species and their responses to climate change are in part determined by their thermal tolerances. However, little is known about how thermal tolerance evolves. To test whether evolutionary extension of thermal limits is accomplished through enhanced cellular stress response (enhanced response), constitutively elevate...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species generally occur and thrive in human-disturbed ecosystems, but Brachyponera chinensis (Asian needle ant, formerly ‘Pachycondyla chinensis’) also invades intact forests. The invasion into native habitats potentially puts B. chinensis in direct competition with the keystone seed-dispersing ants in the genus Aphaenogaster. We observed...
Article
King and Tschinkel (2013) report on a manipulative experiment aimed at assessing the effects of a well-studied invasive ant species (Solenopsis invicta) on the species density and worker abundance of native ants in a relatively undisturbed longleaf pine savanna in northern Florida. Admittedly, the experiment was an impressive undertaking in that it...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid climate change may prompt species distribution shifts upward and poleward, but species movement in itself is not sufficient to establish climate causation. Other dynamics, such as disturbance history, may prompt species distribution shifts resembling those expected from rapid climate change. Links between species distributions, regional clima...
Conference Paper
Understanding the factors that limit the distribution of species and patterns of biodiversity is at the core of ecological and biogeographical research. The complex relationship between environmental conditions and biogeographical distributions often relies on large-scale climatic information and macroecological data from museum records and field g...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Understanding the factors that limit the distribution of species and patterns of biodiversity is at the core of ecological and biogeographical research. The complex relationship between environmental conditions and biogeographical distributions often relies on large-scale climatic information and macroecological data f...
Article
We used radiotelemetry to study the movements and habitat use in a population of Nerodia fasciata fasciata in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina from 2002 to 2006. Snakes that were surgically implanted with radiotransmitters were tracked during late spring of each year and located most days until the onset of hibernation in mid-November. Dat...

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