L. Holly Sweat

L. Holly Sweat
Smithsonian Institution · Smithsonian Marine Station (SMS) at Fort Pierce

PhD Oceanography, MS Biological Oceanography, BS Marine Biology

About

6
Publications
2,232
Reads
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65
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
51 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Fellow
January 2017 - September 2017
Florida Atlantic University
Position
  • Marine Botany Research Specialist
August 2013 - December 2016
Florida Institute of Technology
Position
  • Research Ecologist
Description
  • community dynamics and algal grazing potential of mesozooplankton

Publications

Publications (6)
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter describes the coastal wetlands of the Indian River Lagoon system, including their types, distribution, condition, management and restoration.
Article
Full-text available
Mesozooplankton, as abundant grazers of microalgae in coastal systems, have the potential to prevent or mitigate harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their effects. The Indian River Lagoon (IRL) is a subtropical estuary in eastern Florida (United States) where repeated blooms, dominated by the toxic dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense , the brown tide s...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic filter feeding organisms have the potential to improve local water quality by filtering microalgae and particulate matter out of the water column. A pilot project was conducted to test the concept of creating a Living Dock by growing these filter feeders at a dock in the Indian River Lagoon. Two different methods (mats and bags) were tested...
Article
Full-text available
Biofilm organisms such as diatoms are potential regulators of global macrofouling dispersal because they ubiquitously colonize submerged surfaces, resist antifouling efforts and frequently alter larval recruitment. Although ships continually deliver biofilms to foreign ports, it is unclear how transport shapes biofilm microbial structure and subseq...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic diatoms are a major component of biofilms that form on surfaces submerged in marine environments. Roughness of the underlying substratum affects the settlement of both diatoms and subsequent macrofouling colonizers. This study reports the effects of roughness on estuarine diatom communities established in situ in the Indian River Lagoon, FL...

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Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Biofilms dominated by diatoms and bacteria are ubiquitous in marine systems and are transported globally on ship hulls. Biofilms can promote macrofouling and determine which species recruit to a surface. Therefore, biofilms on ship hulls may help regulate which macrofoulers are transported through hull fouling, a major vector for invasive species dispersal. This study investigates (1) how different transport methods, including freshwater transit, affect mortality of diatoms within coastal marine biofilms and (2) how transport-altered biofilms affect subsequent recruitment of native and invasive macrofoulers.