Kylie Soanes

Kylie Soanes
University of Melbourne | MSD · Department of Forest and Ecosystem Science

PhD (Wildlife ecology)

About

44
Publications
14,730
Reads
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746
Citations
Introduction
I’m a wildlife ecologist/conservation biologist. My work to date has focused the conservation of threatened mammals within the urban areas of southeast Australia, using field studies and genetic approaches to address ecological questions. My main area of expertise is in the field of road ecology, and I have just completed my PhD research evaluating the effectiveness of road-crossing structures for arboreal mammals.
Additional affiliations
December 2016 - present
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Researching the management and conservation of threatened species in cities and towns.
April 2016 - November 2016
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2015 - February 2016
Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2004 - November 2007
Monash University (Australia)
Field of study
  • Zoology and Ecology

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Millions of dollars are spent on wildlife crossing structures intended to reduce the barrier effects of roads on wildlife. However, we know little about the degree to which these structures facilitate dispersal and gene flow. Our study incorporates two elements that are rarely used in the evaluation of wildlife crossing structures: an experimental...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife crossing structures are commonly used to mitigate the barrier and mortality impacts of roads on wildlife. For arboreal mammals, canopy bridges, glider poles and vegetated medians are used to provide safe passage across roads. However, the effectiveness of these measures is unknown. We investigate the effect of canopy bridges, glider poles...
Chapter
Arboreal animals need trees for some or all of their shelter, food and movement. This diverse group of wildlife includes mammals, amphibians and reptiles that climb, crawl and glide in trees. Since trees are a critical resource, arboreal animals are directly affected by habitat loss from road construction. The susceptibility of arboreal animals to...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Wildlife crossing structures are installed to mitigate the impacts of roads on animal populations, yet little is known about some aspects of their success. Many studies have monitored the use of structures by wildlife, but studies that also incorporate individual identification methods can offer additional insights into their effectiveness...
Article
Full-text available
An experimental approach to road mitigation that maximizes inferential power is essential to ensure that mitigation is both ecologically-effective and cost-effective. Here, we set out the need for and standards of using an experimental approach to road mitigation, in order to improve knowledge of the influence of mitigation measures on wildlife pop...
Article
Full-text available
The decline of critical habitat structures, such as large old trees, is a global environmental challenge. The cavities that occur in these trees provide shelter and nesting sites for many species but can take centuries to develop. Artificial cavities, including nest boxes and carved logs, offer an increasingly important conservation response. Howev...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Publication and co-authorship rates have been increasing over decades. In response, calls are being made to restrict the number of publications included in research evaluations. Yet there is little evidence to guide publication expectations and inform research evaluation for early career researchers (ECRs). Methods: Here we examine the...
Article
Aim The road network is increasing globally but the consequences of roadkill on the viability of wildlife populations are largely unknown. We provide a framework that allows us to estimate how risk of extinction of local populations increases due to roadkill and to generate a global assessment that identifies which mammalian species are most vulner...
Article
Full-text available
Across all landscape types, environmental managers work with communities to conserve biodiversity. The effectiveness of conservation practice, however, relies on acknowledging differences in preferences and values of nature. Implementing urban conservation is challenging because cities have diverse social, cultural and ecological attributes, meanin...
Article
Full-text available
Arboreal camera trapping is a burgeoning method providing a novel and effective technique to answer research questions across a variety of ecosystems, and it has the capacity to improve our understanding of a wide range of taxa. However, while terrestrial camera trapping has received much attention, there is little guidance for dealing with the uni...
Article
Full-text available
Traffic disturbances (i.e. pollution, light, noise, and vibrations) often extend into the area surrounding a road creating a 'road-effect zone'. Habitat within the road-effect zone is degraded or, in severe cases, completely unsuitable for wildlife, resulting in indirect habitat loss. This can have a disproportionate impact on wildlife in highly mo...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report investigates the opportunities for threatened species conservation within Australian cities and towns
Technical Report
Full-text available
Urban environments provide an opportunity to conserve biodiversity while engaging people with urban nature. This booklet shares the perspectives and experiences of environmental managers who are working to conserve urban biodiversity and highlights key considerations for implementing new conservation projects. The information will be of interest to...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report forms Part III of the CAUL project “Practical actions for the conservation of urban biodiversity”. Here, we present a detailed list of actions described by land managers across the country. This expanded inventory has been produced to provide a comprehensive list of actions, activities or programs to inspire urban land managers who are...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides an overview of the CAUL Urban Wildlife App and a summary of the data collected and related research activities from January 2017 to November 2020. It is intended as a brief introduction to the goals of the app and each of its modules, as well as a way to report back and thank the hundreds of citizen scientists who have contribu...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides a summary of research activities relating to wetland species in urban environments that were undertaken by the CAUL Hub between 2015 and 2020. It covers research on the role or urban wetlands in threatened species conservation, the threats that affect urban wetland habitats, possible actions to restore and enhance wetlands in c...
Article
In an attempt to improve cost-effectiveness, it has become increasingly popular to adapt wildlife crossing structures to enable people to also use them for safe passage across roads. However, the required needs of humans and wildlife may conflict, resulting in a structure that does not actually provide the perceived improvement in cost-effectivenes...
Article
Engaging school students in wildlife research through citizen science projects can be a win–win for scientists and educators. Not only does it provide a way for scientists to gather new data, but it can also contribute to science education and help younger generations become more environmentally aware. However, wildlife research can be challenging...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The purpose of this research report is to identify current approaches to urban biodiversity conservation in Australian cities and identify opportunities and challenges for undertaking future actions. This project forms the first Australian assessment of its kind, where findings can be used to facilitate improved practice.
Article
Full-text available
Urban environments are arguably among the most suitable targets for conservation science, as they represent opportunities to preserve both species and habitats under threat while at the same time allowing people to engage with nature. We highlight the need for conservation within urban environments using species whose recovery is entirely dependent...
Article
Full-text available
Roads and traffic may be contributing to global declines of insect populations. The ecological effects of roads often extend far into the surrounding habitat, over a distance known as the road‐effect zone. The quality of habitat in the road‐effect zone is generally degraded (e.g., due to edge effects, noise, light, and chemical pollution) and can b...
Article
Full-text available
Despite repeated calls to action, proposals for urban conservation are often met with surprise or scepticism. It seems there remains a pervasive narrative in policy, practice and the public psyche that urban environments, while useful for engaging people with nature or providing ecosystem services, are of little conservation value. We argue that th...
Article
Optimal wildlife survey techniques should maximise detectability or capture rates of target species and minimise potential harm to animals. We compared the effectiveness of Elliott and PVC pipe traps for the capture of small arboreal mammals in the Victorian Central Highlands and found that pipe traps were less effective at capturing small arboreal...
Article
Roads can form barriers to movement for many species, and may reduce the ability of individuals to access foraging and breeding habitat. The impacts of roads on terrestrial fauna has been well studied, however little is known of the impact of roads on insectivorous bats. Wildlife crossing structures (e.g. fauna underpasses) may reduce the barrier i...
Article
11 We review eight years of monitoring data to quantify the number of predation attempts on 12 arboreal marsupials using canopy bridges and glider poles across a major road in southeast 13 Australia. We recorded 13,488 detections of arboreal marsupials on the structures, yet only 14 a single (and unsuccessful) predation attempt was recorded. 15
Article
Full-text available
Road traffic kills hundreds of millions of animals every year, posing a critical threat to the populations of many species. To address this problem there are more than forty types of road mitigation measures available that aim to reduce wildlife mortality on roads (road-kill). For road planners, deciding on what mitigation method to use has been pr...
Article
Full-text available
There is a paradox in the shared objectives of ecology and conservation science, and the dissemination of their research: conservation is about preserving the environment, yet scientists spread this message using conferences with heavy carbon footprints. Further, ecology and conservation science depend on global knowledge exchange-getting the best...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic approaches have proven useful for addressing various conservation problems, but genetics remains poorly integrated into conservation practice. Multidisciplinary conservation conferences present excellent opportunities for bridging the conservation-genetics gap and facilitating cross-disciplinary projects. We hypothesize that there is a tend...
Article
Full-text available
There’s nothing quite like a scenic drive along a tree-lined highway. Majestic eucalypts stand sentry like a guard of honour. As passengers gazing out the car window, we might not think of these narrow, highway-side reserves as prime habitat for wildlife. Yet in many landscapes across Victoria, ‘roadside reserves’ are all that remains of the pre-Eu...
Article
Full-text available
Roadkill (the mortality of animals through wildlife–vehicle collisions) is one of the main impacts of roads on wildlife. Studies quantifying the location and rate of roadkill to identify ‘hot spots’ are often used to guide the location of mitigation efforts, such as fencing or wildlife crossing structures. However, sometimes quantifying rates of ro...
Research
Full-text available
Conservation at the cross-roads: how roads and other linear infrastructure influence conservation symposium at the International Congress of Conservation Biology and the European Congress of Conservation Biology 6th August 2015.
Article
Full-text available
We designed nine polymorphic markers for the squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis), an arboreal marsupial in eastern Australia. These markers will assist in the management of isolated populations and the evaluation of wildlife corridors.
Article
Full-text available
Roads and traffic are prominent components of most landscapes throughout the world, and their negative effects on the natural environment can extend for hundreds or thousands of meters beyond the road. These effects include mortality of wildlife due to collisions with vehicles, pollution of soil and air, modification of wildlife behavior in respons...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
This project compiles the literature on the use and potential of arboreal camera trapping. New uses for arboreal camera trapping are being developed and tested, and they are showing increased potential. This reference compilation should make it easier for those looking to use arboreal camera trapping to find supporting information. Submit your papers to Diego Balbuena or Farah Carrasco via a direct message through Research Gat if it's not already in the references tab.
Archived project
This project investigated the role of cities and towns in the conservation of native biodiversity, and the tools and practical actions that can be used to improve biodiversity in urban environments. The work was completed as part of Clean Air and Urban Landscapes Hub and Threatened Species Recovery Hub of the National Environmental Science Program.