Kurijn Buys

Kurijn Buys
Queen Mary, University of London | QMUL · School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

About

10
Publications
787
Reads
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18
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
7 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022012345
2016201720182019202020212022012345
Additional affiliations
October 2013 - January 2017
The Open University (UK)
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Historical woodwind instruments in museums or private collections often cannot be played, by virtue of their poor condition or the risk of damage. Acoustic impedance measurements may usually be performed on instruments in good condition without risk of damage, but only if they are in playable condition: complete, with functioning mechanism, well-se...
Article
A hybrid wind instrument generates self-sustained sounds via a real-time interaction between a computed excitation model (such as the physical model of human lips interacting with a mouthpiece) and a real acoustic resonator. Attempts to produce a hybrid instrument have so far fallen short, in terms of both the accuracy and the variation in the soun...
Article
A hybrid wind instrument is constructed by putting a theoretical excitation model (such as a real-time computed physical model of a clarinet embouchure) in interaction with a real wind instrument resonator. In previous work, the successful construction of a hybrid wind instrument has been demonstrated, with the interaction facilitated by a loudspea...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A hybrid wind instrument is constructed by putting a theoretical excitation model (such as a real-time computed physical model of a clarinet embouchure) in interaction with a real wind instrument resonator. In previous work, the successful construction of a hybrid wind instrument has been demonstrated, with the interaction facilitated by a loudspea...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A hybrid wind instrument is constructed by connecting a theoretical excitation model (such as a real-time computed physical model of a single-reed mouthpiece) to a loudspeaker and a microphone which are placed at the entrance of a wind instrument resonator (a clarinet-like tube in our case). The successful construction of a hybrid wind instrument,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A hybrid wind instrument generates self-sustained sounds via a real-time interaction between a computed physical model of an exciter (such as human lips interacting with a mouthpiece) and a real acoustic resonator. Successful implementation of a hybrid wind instrument will not only open up new musical possibilities but will also provide a valuable...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In analogy with strings and acoustic pipes as musical har- monic oscillators, a novice electronic oscillator is consid- ered. The equivalent circuit of a discrete representation of strings and pipes, which takes the form of a discrete transmission line, is constructed with real electronic com- ponents. The proposed model includes the “equivalent se...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Une part importante de la signature sonore de chaque instrumentiste provient de son geste musical (con-duite de l'archet, configuration du conduit vocal,...). Jusqu'` a présent, lesétudes portant sur cette notion d'identité sonore se sont essentiellement déroulées dans le contexte des instrumentsà sons entretenus (violon, clarinette, ...). Néanmoin...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Musical performers spend many years achieving proficiency on their instruments. Newly-created digital musical instruments (DMIs) face a significant barrier to adoption in that few performers are willing to repeat these years of training to develop expertise on an unknown instrument. Without expert players, evaluating the success of a DMI design is challenging, and establishing its place in a broader musical community is nearly impossible. As a result, while many digital instruments have been created over the past decade, few have achieved lasting impact beyond the first few performances. This fellowship proposes a new approach to DMI design which repurposes the existing skills and experience of trained musicians, providing them with a rapid path to virtuosity without years of retraining.