Kuniya Nasukawa

Kuniya Nasukawa
Tohoku Gakuin University · Department of English

Doctor of Philosophy

About

45
Publications
6,236
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280
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
125 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
Introduction
Kuniya Nasukawa currently works at the Department of English, Tohoku Gakuin University. Kuniya does research in Linguistic Typology, Morphology and Phonology. Their current project is 'Phonological recursion and the place of phonology in the Minimalist Program'.

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
By comparing different theoretical models of phonological representation, this paper considers (i) what kinds of properties are lexically specified in morpheme-internal phonological structure, and (ii) how this morpheme-internal phonological structure is constructed before being stored in the mental lexicon. The aim is to contribute to the ongoing...
Article
This paper examines the historical and phonological properties of h in Japanese. It shows that, by analysing a specific case of segmental variation, we not only deepen our understanding of the sound which varies but also shed light on some general characteristics of the sound system as a whole. Using an Element Theory approach ( Anderson and Jones...
Article
It is known that consonants can act as boundary markers when they are located at the left edge of a prosodic domain, helping listeners to parse incoming speech. To achieve maximum efficiency in marking out boundaries, those markers should be acoustically salient. In Element Theory, domain markers are represented by the elements |H| and |ʔ|. Being i...
Article
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This paper examines the historical and phonological properties of Japanese h in an Element Theory approach (Nasukawa 2005, Backley 2012). It argues that the element |U| is naturally weak in Japanese, which accounts for two synchronic idiosyncrasies — the restricted distribution of labials and rounded vowels, and the patterning of h with labials. Th...
Article
Duanmu San , A theory of phonological features (Oxford Linguistics). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. vii + 178. - Volume 53 Issue 2 - Kuniya Nasukawa
Article
Full-text available
Japanese exhibits two patterns involving palatality: palatalisation, which causes two adjacent segments to share palatality, and de-palatalisation, which renders one of those two adjacent segments unable to sustain the shared palatal property. These patterns are traditionally analysed by referring to the notions of adjacency and/or precedence. By c...
Chapter
Phonology is generally assumed to be recursion-free (Pinker and Jackendoff 2005; Neeleman and van de Koot 2006; Samuels 2009; Scheer 2008, 2011). However, this view is challenged here by arguing that recursion does play a part in constructing the phonological shape of morphemes within a precedencefree and concatenation-based approach to phonology (...
Chapter
This chapter challenges the view that the palatal glide j in Japanese is an onset segment and is the only consonant that may appear in the second position of an initial CC sequence. The phonological behavior of j reveals a strong correlation with the following vowel rather than with the preceding consonant: j appears if and only if the following vo...
Article
Full-text available
The segmental structure of a word expresses two kinds of information, melodic and prosodic. Here we take ‘melodic’ information to refer to the segmental (i.e. spectral) properties relevant to lexical contrasts, while ‘prosodic’ information refers to the location of prosodic domain boundaries at and below the word level (i.e. to the left and right e...
Article
Based on the cross-linguistic tendency that weak vowels are realized with a central quality such as ə, ɨ, or ɯ, this paper attempts to account for this choice by proposing that the nucleus itself is one of the three monovalent vowel elements |A|, |I| and |U| which function as the building blocks of melodic structure. I claim that individual languag...
Article
Full-text available
Nasukawa, Yasugi and Koizumi (2013) propose that the dependency structure and stress assignment patterns in Kaqchikel are reversed compared to Indo-European languages. Following this argument, words in Kaqchikel are expected to be phonologically processed in a right-to-left incremental fashion, whereas the majority of languages process words left-t...
Article
Based on the cross-linguistic tendency that weak vowels are realized with a central quality such as ə, ɨ, or ɯ, this paper attempts to account for this choice by proposing that the nucleus itself is one of the three monovalent vowel elements |A|, |I| and |U| which function as the building blocks of melodic structure. I claim that individual languag...
Article
It has been argued that Shanghai Chinese has a smaller tonal domain than other Chinese dialects including Standard Chinese, Xiamen, and Taiwanese. The difference has been analyzed by setting an edge parameter (Selkirk and Shen 1990) or by ranking edge-alignment constraints (cf. Truckenbrodt 1999) at the syntax-phonology interface. Unlike these anal...
Article
Full-text available
This paper demonstrates how L contributes in two different ways to the pitch pattern of nouns in Tokyo Japanese. First, L functions as a prosodic marker, signalling the left edge of prosodic word domains. And second, L (rather than H) functions as the marked tonal property. It is argued that a lexical accent is cued by a fall in pitch, represented...
Article
Full-text available
Besides encoding lexical contrasts, melodic (segmental) structure also conveys information about prosodic structure; in particular, it identifies where prosodic domains (syllable, foot, word) begin and end. This makes for efficient parsing by helping listeners break up the incoming speech stream into individual words. Strong segments act as prosodi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the phonological behaviour of r in Japanese, arguing that it is represented in the Element Theory model by the single element |I|. Segments containing a single element are inherently weak: in the case of Japanese r it is prone to elision, it can result from lenition, and it prefers prosodically weak positions. Further motivation...
Article
In the pursuit of a strictly monostratal model of phonology, syllable/prosodic structure is fully specified in lexical representations. Accordingly, information relating to the linear order of segments is redundant in representations: dependency relations holding between syllabic categories are sufficient to account for phonological phenomena. This...
Article
Japanese has been conventionally considered to show two distinct distributional regularities holding in morpheme-final position: at the lexical level, verb stems can end with either a vowel or a consonant, whereas other morpheme types and derived/inflected forms must end with either a vowel or the placeless nasal n. Mono-stratal models of phonology...
Article
Full-text available
This paper motivates the Element Theory view that vowels and consonants are described using a single, unified set of features (elements). This position contrasts with traditional feature-based models in which vowels and consonants are described in their own terms using separate feature sets. These models miss the fact that vowels and consonants can...
Article
Full-text available
Segmental structure is traditionally represented using distinctive features which describe articulatory properties such as tongue position and glottal state. Yet evidence from language acquisition and some phonological processes suggests that language users associate segments primarily with their acoustic attributes, not with articulation. In Eleme...
Article
Full-text available
Affricates are traditionally analysed as contour segments containing both values of the feature [±cont], where the sequential ordering of [–cont] and [+cont] must be stipulated in representations to produce the stop-fricative contour. Owing to the problems associated with this view, we argue that affricates should instead be represented phonologica...
Article
Full-text available
Main points: ● This talk discusses the formal status of precedence, which is crucial for generating syllable structure in a derived representation, and in OT they are necessary for evaluating a given syllable structure in an output form. ● In a monostratal approach in phonology, syllable structure is fully specified in the lexicon according to univ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper proposes an intra-segmental element geometry which attempts to model the universal characteristics of melodic structure in consonants (and, by extension, in vowels). Building on an earlier element geometry (Harris 1994), it focuses on the representation of markedness properties in individual elements and element combinations. Our claim i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents a cross‐sectional and longitudinal investigation into the development of a contrast in voicing production in simple and complex consonant clusters for 21 children. The results showed that, although the group results indicated a progression that may have been caused either by development in articulatory proficiency or by an growi...
Book
Full-text available
This paper presents a cross‐sectional and longitudinal investigation into the development of a contrast in voicing production in simple and complex consonant clusters for 21 children. The results showed that, although the group results indicated a progression that may have been caused either by development in articulatory proficiency or by an growi...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike vowel harmony, which operates between nuclear projections, nasal harmony is usually considered to display string adjacency. This paper attempts to unify these two types of assimilation by bringing nasal harmony into line with vowel harmony. The conclusion is that all assimilatory processes are controlled by higher-level prosodic structure ra...
Article
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In the northern Tohoku dialect of Japanese (Kanai 1982), it has been assumed that the melodic structure of prenasalised plosives is more complex than that of voiced plosives. This paper questions that view, however, calling upon the argument that prenasalisation occurs only in truly voiced plosives in an intervocalic environment. The analysis refer...
Article
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This paper considers the phonological representation of nasals in Japanese; unlike the majority of other consonant classes, the syllabification of nasals varies in the literature. Most phonologists agree that the place-specified nasals are syllabified into onset positions, certain conditions excepted (Abe 1986, Itô 1986, Yoshida 1990), but the syll...
Article
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This paper employs the notion of melodic complexity in analysing the mismatch between perception and production in the acquisition of laryngeal-source contrasts in Japanese infants. Adopting the view that child phonology is governed by the same computational characteristics as adult phonology, it claims that the disparity is attributed to the resul...
Article
Full-text available
This paper addresses the apparently paradoxical behaviour of nasals in Yamato Japanese, where voice is active for nasals in postnasal voicing but inactive in Rendaku (Itô et al 1995). In order to explain this paradox, I propose that the two primes conventionally used to denote nasality and voicing are identical, and that the difference is determine...
Article
Full-text available
Syllabic nasals, which are found in languages such as Pali, Japanese and many Bantu and Ogoni languages, exhibit both consonantal and vocalic characteristics in terms of their tonal/metrical properties and static distribution (Ferguson 1963, Hyman 1985, Nasukawa 2004). In the literature (Hyman 1985, Bickmore 2007 and others), in order to incorporat...
Article
In Japanese, words must end with either a vowel or the moraic placeless nasal ɴ. According to the literature (cf. Block 1946, McCawly 1968, Davis & Tsujimura 1991, Tsujimura 1996), this static distributional regularity works only at the 'word'-level (whether nouns, adjectives, case markers or postpositions are involved). In the case of verb stems,...

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Project (1)
Project
Hauser, Chomsky and Fitch (2002) claim that the presence/absence of recursion divides the organisation of the language faculty into two parts: FLB and FLN. The origins of properties in FLB are thought to be shared by non-human species, whereas FLN contains the species-specific operation Merge, which applies repeatedly to syntactic objects to generate recursively-structured expressions. However, this project claims that Merge applies not only to (morpho)syntactic objects but also to phonological primitives that make up the phonological structure of morphemes. Accordingly, phonological categories are engaged not only in the externalization of internally-constructed expressions but also in internal computation.