Kristin Snopkowski

Kristin Snopkowski
Boise State University | BSU · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

21
Publications
15,209
Reads
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303
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
275 Citations
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Introduction
Kristin Snopkowski currently works at Boise State University in the Department of Anthropology. She is a human behavioral ecologist who specializes in examining reproductive decision-making cross culturally, understanding how kin cooperation and conflict may influence these reproductive decisions, and how partners negotiate reproductive and parenting decisions.
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
Boise State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
April 2012 - July 2014
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
September 2003 - December 2011
University of New Mexico
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
It has been suggested that human mothers are cooperative breeders, as they need help from others to successfully raise offspring. Studies working under this framework have found correlations between the presence of kin and both child survival and female fertility rates. This study seeks to understand the proximate mechanisms by which kin influence...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers across the social sciences have long been interested in families. How people make decisions such as who to marry, when to have a baby, how big or small a family to have, or whether to stay with a partner or stray are questions that continue to interest economists, sociologists, demographers, and anthropologists. Human families vary acro...
Article
Full-text available
Suicidality is an important contributor to disease burden worldwide. We examine the developmental and environmental correlates of reported suicidal ideation at age 15 and develop a new evolutionary model of suicidality based on life history trade-offs and hypothesized accompanying modulations of cognition. Data were derived from the National Longit...
Article
Full-text available
Small group learning activities have been shown to improve student academic performance and educational outcomes. Yet, we have an imperfect understanding of the mechanisms by which this occurs. Group learning may mediate student stress by placing learning in a context where students have both social support and greater control over their learning....
Article
Early life factors are associated with the timing of reproductive events in adolescence, but a variety of hypotheses (such as psychosocial acceleration theory, paternal investment theory, extrinsic mortality, internal prediction, and intergenerational conflict) propose different explanations for why this may occur. To compare between these theories...
Article
The demographic transition is the change from a high‐mortality, high‐fertility population to one with low mortality and low fertility, which tends to accompany industrialization. Evolutionary anthropologists are particularly interested in studying the demographic transition because low fertility levels, as experienced around the world today, appear...
Article
Full-text available
Fertility decline in human populations is an inherent evolutionary puzzle with major demographic, socio-cultural and evolutionary consequences. The individual level predictors of fertility decline are numerous, but the way these effects vary by country and how they are causally mediated by other factors has received relatively little attention. Her...
Article
Full-text available
Serial monogamy is likely an adaptive mating strategy for women when the expected future fitness gains with a different partner are greater than expected future fitness with one’s current partner. Using interview data from more than 400 women in San Borja, Bolivia, discrete-time event history analyses and random effects regression analyses were con...
Article
Full-text available
Several empirical observations suggest that when women have more autonomy over their reproductive decisions, fertility is lower. Some evolutionary theorists have interpreted this as evidence for sexual conflicts of interest, arguing that higher fertility is more adaptive for men than women. We suggest the assumptions underlying these arguments are...
Article
Full-text available
Women’s education has emerged as a central predictor of fertility decline, but the many ways that education affects fertility have not been subject to detailed comparative investigation. Taking an evolutionary biosocial approach, we use structural equation modelling to examine potential pathways between education and fertility including: infant/chi...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that kin availability may be correlated with reproductive outcomes, but it is not clear that a causal relationship underlies these findings. Further, there is substantial variation in how kin availability is measured. Objective: We attempt to identify whether different measures of kin availability influence how kin affect...
Article
Full-text available
Caldwell's theory of wealth flows explains fertility decline as a rational decision by parents based on the direction of intergenerational transfers. In high-fertility contexts, this theory proposes that children produce more than they consume and therefore provide net wealth to parents. In contrast, in low-fertility contexts, parents invest more i...
Article
Full-text available
A considerable body of evidence has now demonstrated positive correlations between grandparental presence and child health outcomes. It is typically assumed that such correlations exist because grandparental investment in their grandchildren improves child health and wellbeing. However, less is known about how grandparents allocate help to adult ch...
Article
This article presents a biosocial model of fertility decline, which integrates ecological-economic and informational-cultural hypotheses of fertility transition in a unified theoretical framework. The model is then applied to empirical data collected among 500 women from San Borja, Bolivia, a population undergoing fertility transition. Using a comb...
Article
Full-text available
Menopause remains an evolutionary puzzle, as humans are unique among primates in having a long post-fertile lifespan. One model proposes that intergenerational conflict in patrilocal populations favours female reproductive cessation. This model predicts that women should experience menopause earlier in groups with an evolutionary history of patrilo...
Article
Full-text available
Father absence is consistently associated with children’s reproductive outcomes in industrialized countries. It has been suggested that father absence acts as a cue to particular environmental conditions that influence life history strategies. Much less is known, however, about the effects of father absence on such outcomes in lower-income countrie...

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Project (1)
Archived project
Two broad goals: 1. Examine various stressors (pre-and-post resettlement) and their influence on the health and well-being of refugee youth and family functioning. 2. Explore moderators that exacerbate stress pathways or reduce them to promote resilience among refugee youth and families.