Kristen Lucas

Kristen Lucas
University of Louisville | UL · Management & Entrepreneurship Department

PhD

About

46
Publications
159,433
Reads
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2,700
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
1653 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - present
University of Louisville
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2006 - July 2012
University of Nebraska at Lincoln
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
In 2010, a cluster of suicides at the electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn Technology Group sparked worldwide outcry about working conditions at its factories in China. Within a few short months, 14 young migrant workers jumped to their deaths from buildings on the Foxconn campus, an all-encompassing compound where they had worked, eaten, and sl...
Article
Full-text available
People generally possess a strong desire to construct positive, dignified work identities. However, this goal may be more challenging for some people, such as blue-collar workers, whose occupations may not offer qualities typically associated with workplace dignity. Interviews with 37 people from a blue-collar mining community reveal three central...
Article
Full-text available
Extant research on dignity at work has revealed conditions that contribute to indignity, employees' responses to dignity threats, and ways in which employees' inherent dignity is undermined. But while dignity—and specifically indignity—is theorized as a phenomenon subjectively experienced and judged by individuals, little research has privileged wo...
Article
While there has been a growing body of research on workplace dignity, the majority of studies tend to focus on how dignity is experienced by organizational members, paying considerably less attention to consequences for organizations. In this study, we explore the influence of workplace dignity on employee work behaviors that affect organizational...
Article
Full-text available
As organizational scholars have become critically attuned to human flourishing in the workplace, interest in workplace dignity has grown rapidly. Yet, a valid scale to measure employees’ perceptions of dignity in the workplace has yet to be developed, thereby limiting potential empirical insights. To fill this need, we conducted a systematic, multi...
Article
Courses: Public speaking, business and professional communication, group communication Objectives: This activity will introduce Monroe's Motivated Sequence as a way to organize persuasive arguments; improve students’ ability to deliver presentations with consistent content, voice, and style; and improve team-based delivery skills.
Article
As organizational scholars have become critically attuned to human flourishing in the workplace, interest in workplace dignity has grown rapidly. Yet, a valid scale to measure employees’ perceptions of dignity in the workplace has yet to be developed, thereby limiting potential empirical insights. To fill this need, we conducted a systematic, multi...
Article
Full-text available
Despite increased efforts by more organizations to be seen as “gay-friendly,” workplaces remain challenging sites for LGBTQ employees to navigate. We examine the ways in which LGBTQ employees experience dignity threats in the workplace and the protection strategies they use to deflect those threats. Interviews with 36 LGBTQ working adults revealed...
Chapter
Mobility refers to the ability of people to traverse through different social spaces, including geographic spaces, workspaces, organizational hierarchy, and social classes. Key dimensions of mobility include whether mobility is voluntary–involuntary or upward–downward. Several organizational communication processes are embedded in the experience of...
Chapter
Full-text available
Workplace dignity is the self-recognized and other-recognized worth acquired from engaging in work activity. Grounded in philosophy and sociology, workplace dignity is a multifaceted phenomenon that reflects multiple and overlapping meanings: dignity as recognition of inherent human value, respect, autonomy, contribution, and status. These differen...
Article
Full-text available
http://bized.aacsb.edu/articles/2017/01/toward-better-business-communication
Article
Research problem: Entrepreneurial passion has been shown to play an important role in venture success and, therefore, in investors' funding decisions. However, it is unknown whether the passion entrepreneurs personally feel or experience can be accurately assessed by investors during a venture pitch. Research questions: (1) To what extent does entr...
Article
Guided by a feminist communicology of organization framework, we examine generational growing pains by analyzing discourses appearing in HR Magazine at three different points in time, which approximately mark the midpoint of Baby Boomers’, Gen Xers’, and Millennials’ initial entry into the workplace. We reconstruct historically situated gendered di...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dignity is widely considered to be an essential element of decent work. However, the extent to which people are able to derive a sense of worth and value from their work roles and the extent to which they are treated respectfully while on the job can vary greatly. One social identity that is particularly salient for understanding the achievement of...
Article
In this article, we outline a competency-based approach to teaching business communication. At the heart of this approach, classroom instruction, assignments, and evaluation center on a goals-oriented and receiver-centric understanding of communication in which students are taught strategies for meeting five core competencies of business communicat...
Article
Courses: Public speaking, business, and professional communicationObjectives: To improve students' ability to use storytelling elements in presentations; to improve students' ability to design visually appealing slides; to improve students' ability to be concise in oral presentations.
Article
Dignity is widely considered to be an essential element of decent work. However, the extent to which people are able to derive a sense of worth and value from their work roles and the extent to which they are treated respectfully while on the job can vary greatly. One social identity that is particularly salient for understanding the achievement of...
Article
Full-text available
The forum guest editor Ryan Bisel in this issue takes on the topic of big data and presents a round table that grew out of a conference panel. Five scholars engage in a discussion of the social and cultural trend of big data and implications to qualitative organizational communication research. The contributors respond to questions and delve into a...
Article
For 15 years, former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky used his Penn State University perquisites to lure young and fatherless boys by offering them special access to one of the most revered football programs in the country. He repeatedly used the football locker room as a space to groom, molest, and rape his victims. In February 2001, an eye...
Article
Teaching novice qualitative researchers how to move beyond first-cycle themes is a challenging endeavor. In this essay, we articulate four harmful habits that tend to impede our success: moving too quickly, privileging product over process, providing cursory coverage of analytic technique and artistry, and overlooking the role of synthesis in quali...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract As the movement to capitalize on unique affordances of video games for learning continues to grow, relatively, little research in that area has examined how formal features, such as genre and game mechanics, draw and hold children's attention. This study examines which genres children prefer and the reasons why children prefer those genres...
Chapter
Full-text available
Choice is foundational to contemporary careers. Yet, it often is constrained and contested in imperceptible ways. We reposition Ciulla's (2000) four reasons for work--meaningful work, leisure, money, and security--as discursive frames whereby people make career choices, craft their choice-legitimizing stories, and overemphasize the rhetoric of indi...
Article
We take a communicative and life course theory approach to understanding how resilience is constructed in families. Drawing upon interviews with 20 fathers, 16 mothers, and 23 children who dealt with financial hardship during the 1980s recession, we analyze the messages families communicated about finances when their children were young and how the...
Article
Full-text available
In-depth interviews with 62 people with working class ties (blue-collar workers and adult sons and daughters of blue-collar workers) reveal a social construction of working class that imbues it with four core, positively valenced values: strong work ethic, provider orientation, the dignity of all work and workers, and humility. This constellation o...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this activity is for students to examine systematically gendered scripts and stereotypes about romantic relationships. As a secondary purpose, the activity demonstrates the value of communication research in seeking dependable answers to important questions
Article
Full-text available
This study explicitly links processes of anticipatory socialization to social mobility and reproduction. An examination of the socializing messages exchanged between blue-collar parents (n = 41) and their children (n = 25) demonstrate that family-based messages about work and career seldom occur in straightforward, unambiguous ways. Instead, messag...
Article
Full-text available
Unquestionably, food and the way we communicate about it are important markers of identity. Like other chapters in this volume that illuminate connections to cultural, social, and gendered identities, food also is inherently linked to social class. Dougherty, Dixon, and Chou (2009) explain that people from different social classes have distinct rel...
Article
Full-text available
Communication teachers spend considerable time instructing students how to organize and deliver professional oral presentations, design effective PowerPoint slides, answer interview questions, and communicate effectively in problem-solving teams. Yet considerably less time is spent systematically teaching them the communication skill they will use...
Article
Full-text available
Questionnaires were completed by 5th-, 8th-, and 11th-grade public schools students in rural and suburban school districts and by undergraduates at two universities in the United States (n = 1,242). They were asked about their orientation to video games—the amount of time they played, their motives for doing so, and the game types they preferred—to...
Article
Full-text available
An analysis of interviews with mining families reveals that gender identity construction is a collaborative process that draws upon broader community discourses. Male miners and non-mining women created a generalized other for women as “unfit to mine” (i.e., women are physically too weak to mine, are easy prey, and are ladies who do not belong in t...
Article
Full-text available
The daunting challenges of making ends meet can have serious implications for members of the working class, particularly in terms of dignity. The ability to provide is tied inextricably to personal dignity; threats to the ability to make ends meet are threats to dignity. For example, Riggs explains that, by and large, society imposes a mandate upon...
Article
Few studies have focused on disadvantaged men's efforts to seek a second chance to remake their lives. In this article, we examine expressions of generativity in life history interviews with a diverse sample of 77 Black and White low-income fathers. We explore what constituted "the difficult past" of men's failures as providers, partners, students,...
Chapter
Gendered stories of career: Unfolding discourses of time, space, and identity At a conference sponsored by the National Bureau of Economic Research in January 2005, Lawrence H. Summers, president of Harvard University, sparked national attention when he addressed the issue of the underrepresentation of women in tenured faculty positions in science...
Article
Full-text available
During the recession of the early 1980s, the United States experienced a massive industrial downturn. More than 3 million blue-collar jobs permanently vanished from the economic landscape, altering the structure and availability of once-viable career paths. Therefore, the goal of this project was to learn about the experiences of the sons and daugh...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined underground iron ore miners' occupational narratives to uncover how their stories socialize miners into blue-collar careers and reinforce their work identities. Through the root theme of sisu (Finnish for inner determination), underground miners create a status hierarchy that is used to construct a sense of pride around their wo...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we examined gender differences in video game use by focusing on interpersonal needs for inclusion, affection, and control, as well as socially constructed perceptions of gendered game play. Results of a large-scale survey (n = 534) of young adults’ reasons for video game use, preferred game genres, and amount of game play are reporte...
Article
In today’s technologically advanced business world, organizations are increasingly relying on computer-mediated communication (CMC) in their day-to-day operations. Employees are teleworking instead of commuting to the office, business travel is being replaced by videoconferencing, and problem-solving sessions are moving from conference rooms to com...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (M.A.)--Purdue University, 2002. Bibliography: leaves 86-95.

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In addition to my primary research interests, I also publish pedagogical articles. These tend to focus broadly on business communication.
Project
This project represents a series of studies that examine workplace dignity in various contexts. Ongoing research includes qualitative and theoretical examinations of the relationship between dignity and social class.