Krista Kraskura

Krista Kraskura
University of California, Santa Barbara | UCSB · Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology

PhD

About

12
Publications
982
Reads
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77
Citations
Education
September 2015 - August 2017
Towson University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences - Fish Physiology

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Fish physiological performance is directly regulated by their thermal environment. Intraspecific comparisons are essential to ascertain the vulnerability of fish populations to climate change and to identify which populations may be more susceptible to extirpation and which may be more resilient to continued warming. In this study, we sought to eva...
Article
Full-text available
Thermal acclimation is a key process enabling ectotherms to cope with temperature change. To undergo a successful acclimation response, ectotherms require energy and nutritional building blocks obtained from their diet. However, diet is often overlooked as a factor that can alter acclimation responses. Using a temperate omnivorous fish, opaleye (Gi...
Article
Gymnotiform swimming is a specialized form of swimming wherein thrust is produced by the ribbonlike motion of an elongate anal fin, while the body is held relatively stiff. This form of swimming has been extensively examined in relation to the biomechanics of thrust production, the kinematics of the anal fin, and neuromuscular control, whereas few...
Article
Female-biased mortality has been repeatedly reported in Pacific salmon during their upriver migration in both field studies and laboratory-holding experiments, especially in the presence of multiple environmental stressors, including thermal stress. Here we used coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to test whether females exposed to elevated water te...
Article
Juvenile striped bass reside in the Chesapeake Bay where they are likely to encounter hypoxia that could affect their metabolism and performance. The ecological success of this economically valuable species may depend on their ability to tolerate hypoxia and perform fitness-dependent activities in hypoxic waters. We tested whether there is a link b...
Article
Both laboratory and field respirometry are rapidly growing techniques to determine animal performance thresholds. However, replicating protocols to estimate maximum metabolic rate (MMR) between species, populations, and individuals can be difficult, especially in the field. We therefore evaluated seven different exercise treatments-four laboratory...
Article
Full-text available
Adult female Pacific salmon can have higher migration mortality rates than males, particularly at warm temperatures. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain a mystery. Given the importance of swimming energetics on fitness, we measured critical swim speed, swimming metabolism, cost of transport, aerobic scope (absolute and factori...
Article
Full-text available
As an example of applying the evidential approach to statistical inference, we address one of the longest standing controversies in ecology, the evidence for, or against, a universal metabolic scaling relationship between metabolic rate and body mass. Using fish as our study taxa, we curated 25 studies with measurements of standard metabolic rate,...
Article
Chesapeake Bay is the primary nursery for striped bass (Morone saxatilis), which are increasingly being exposed to hypoxic waters. Tolerance to hypoxia in fish is generally determined by a single exposure of an isolated individual or by exposing large groups of conspecifics to hypoxia without regard to social status. The importance of social contex...
Article
Annual hypoxia in the Chesapeake Bay has expanded to the point where Darwinian fitness of juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis) may depend on their ability to perform in low-oxygen environments. The locomotion they use in predator/prey dynamics relies primarily on white (type II) muscle that is powered by anaerobic metabolic pathways and has gen...

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