Krista Bonello Rutter Giappone

Krista Bonello Rutter Giappone
University of Malta · Department of English

About

26
Publications
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27
Citations

Publications

Publications (26)
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study is funded within the frame EU Research and Innovation Programme, Horizon 2020, European Cooperation in Science and Technology, COST Action Global Digital Human Rights Net (H2020 project COST Action Grant no.: CA19143). This study looks into the proposed “vaccine passport” initiative from various human rights aspects. It was undertaken by...
Article
This article considers the displacement suggested by the film’s title and the pursuit of the past in the unsettled present. The film occupies an intermediary time and space, as implied by the uncomprehending reactions of those left behind, the investigative reconstruction and the delayed breakthrough of trauma.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To recognize satire, the audience must be aware of the context and the satirical intent of the work in question. Academic research on the possibilities and effects of satire in games is minimal, if compared with other rhetorical uses of playful interaction. This paper contributes to our understanding of satire in games by discussing and annotating...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The persuasive potential of games and their use in political propaganda and raising social awareness are well-established components of the game studies discourse, and the literature around persuasive games highlights satire among the expressive tones of several games. Despite this, what persuasive games' literature still lacks is a complete and st...
Chapter
This chapter draws out a recurring theme in both punk and altcom: the declared aim of ‘honesty’ and the drive towards authenticity, discussed in terms of the paradox of ‘style without affectation’ (Lydon in Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs: The Authorised Autobiography, Plexus, London, p. 84, 1994). Any discussion of ‘honesty’ in punk must take...
Chapter
This chapter considers ‘Modes of Dis-/Engagement’: strategies used by performers to reassert some degree of distance, even in intimate performance spaces which seemed conducive to a sense of immediacy. Hostility, alienation, and aggression, as well as abjection and the courting of disgust, were features of both punk and altcom. The meta-comic could...
Chapter
This chapter explores the shift in the relationship between audience and performer, tackling the responses available to audiences, both those attuned to punk conventions and the unconverted/uninitiated. The punk audience appeared to be a ‘new’ kind of audience—seemingly authorised to participate and even be unruly. This translated into an increase...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on attitudes and approaches to the past, particularly the interplay between parody and lingering nostalgia (despite the latter seeming to be one avenue unsanctioned by punk), and the opening of a particular critical-parodic stance towards the present, as well as past. Parody is considered as a humorous means of enabling deconst...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the value placed on the ‘amateur’s’ lack of skill in both altcom and punk—rather, an inversion of traditional values (sometimes having parodic effect), whereby being able to play gives way to ‘playfulness’, and thence to room for experimentation. This is discussed as a deliberate strategy for bypassing established procedure...
Chapter
The first part of the concluding chapter draws out the interplay between ‘authorship’, ‘authority’, ‘authenticity’, and ‘responsibility’—recurring key concerns. Punk had already laid bare the question of authorship (also of crucial importance in altcom) as a space of both contestation and assertion. Convergences and divergences between punk and alt...
Chapter
‘Peter Cook: Missing Links’ posits a shared influence on punk and altcom in Peter Cook. While ostensibly detached from either scene, with more missed encounters than direct associations (for example, he was considered as a scriptwriter for the Pistols film project, but this collaboration never materialised), there were yet a couple of key moments t...
Chapter
This chapter explores punk and altcom through their relations to categories they ostensibly offered an ‘alternative’ to. This space was often not quite one of definite opposition through separation, but was open to negotiations, conflicts and encounters, and counterpositions in its turn, and was not free of ‘anxiety of influence’. The paradoxical p...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on shifts away from ‘covert’ means of implying underlying shared meaning (such as irony and innuendo), to the troubling of those assumptions of trust and immediate understanding. Increased obscenity indicated a more ‘direct’ approach. ‘New’ areas rendered available for comic treatment by punk are discerned, with a shift into ov...
Chapter
The impossibility of fully occupying both subject and object positions within one’s own gaze both produces and limits subjectivity. Yet, in some of Lydon’s performances, there is the suggestion of reclaiming ground, owning one’s own public image—a necessarily incomplete attempt to watch oneself. The resulting interplay of gazes has implications for...
Article
This article considers a cluster of twenty-first-century horror films that explore the idea of an urban hunter stalking victims in the city: The Last Horror Movie (Richards, 2003), Maniac (Khalfoun, 2012) and Nightcrawler (Gilroy, 2014). The urban context is discussed as a setting that surrounds, bewilders and potentially influences the action. Psy...
Book
This book examines the interconnections between punk and alternative comedy (altcom). It explores how punk’s tendency towards humour and parody influenced the trajectory taken by altcom in the UK, and the punk strategies introduced when altcom sought self-definition against dominant established trends. The Punk Turn in Comedy considers the early pr...
Article
The origins of ‘alternative comedy’ are difficult to pinpoint, though it coincided with the rise of Thatcher as Prime Minister in 1979 – that year saw the appearance of something called ‘alternative cabaret’, a term usually associated with Tony Allen, who combined activism and comedy. The acts this article will focus on are those which took a criti...
Article
This article focuses primarily on the "adventure game" genre, its metafictional humor, and tendency towards self-parody in both its formative stage and its more recent ensuing nostalgic turn, with particular reference to Zork (Infocom, 1980), LucasArts' Monkey Island games (1990-2000), and Telltale's parodic-nostalgic "Reality 2.0" (Sam and Max, 20...
Article
My paper addresses the issues of ‘beyond text’ through a ‘poststructuralist’ reading of Shakespeare’s Richard III and Richard III. Richard III, the eponymous character of the play, worms his way to the top through violence, murder, and dexterity, but most of all through what seems to be skilful and cunning manipulation of event, character as textua...

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