Krishnamohan K. S.

Krishnamohan K. S.
Cochin University of Science and Technology | CUSAT · School of Environmental Studies

PhD

About

10
Publications
3,578
Reads
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126
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2021 - present
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2017 - February 2021
Indian Institute of Science
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Project: Climate Modeling of Geoengineering
April 2014 - March 2016
Sorbonne Université
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Project: Influence of air-sea coupling on tropical cyclone intensification in the Bay of Bengal
Education
August 2009 - September 2013
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Field of study
  • Environmental Influences on the frequency and Intensity of North Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclones
December 2008
CSIR-NET Scholarship
Field of study
August 2006 - July 2008

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Cyclonic storms having maximum winds of 34 knots and above that had genesis in north Indian Ocean have been studied with respect to the eastward passage of Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO). In the three decades (1979–2008), there were a total of 118 cyclones reported in which 96 formed in the region chosen (0–15oN, 60oE–100oE) for the study. Althoug...
Article
Full-text available
The densely populated Bay of Bengal (BoB) rim witnesses the deadliest tropical cyclones (TCs) globally, before and after the summer monsoon. Previous studies indicated that enhanced salinity and reduced thermal stratification reduce cooling under BoB TCs after the monsoon, suggesting that air-sea coupling may favor stronger TCs during that season....
Article
The northern Bay of Bengal (BoB) receives a large amount of freshwater directly from monsoonal rains over the ocean, and indirectly through river runoffs. It has been proposed that the resulting strong salinity stratification inhibits vertical mixing of heat, thus contributing to maintain warm sea surface temperature and high climatological rainfal...
Article
Full-text available
Reduction of surface temperatures of the planet by injecting sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere has been suggested as an option to reduce the amount of human-induced climate warming. Several previous studies have shown that for a specified amount of injection, aerosols injected at a higher altitude in the stratosphere would produce more cooling b...
Article
Full-text available
Climate intervention through deliberate injection of sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere is one of the proposed solar radiation modification options to counteract some of the adverse effects of climate change. Although this approach can offset global mean temperature change, several studies have shown that there will be large residual and overco...
Article
In this study, we perform idealized climate model simulations to assess the relative impacts of an increase in local black carbon (BC) aerosols (located over the Indian region) and the remote BC aerosols (located outside the Indian region) on the summer monsoon precipitation over India. We decompose the precipitation changes into fast adjustments t...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Solar geoengineering by deliberate injection of sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere is one of the proposed options to counter anthropogenic climate warming. In this study, we focus on the effect of a specific microphysical property of sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere: hygroscopic growth—the tendency of particles to grow by accumulatin...
Article
Full-text available
Reduction of surface temperatures of the planet by injecting sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere has been suggested as an option to reduce the amount of human-induced climate warming. Several previous studies have shown that for a specified amount of injection, aerosols injected at a higher altitude in the stratosphere would produce more cooling b...
Article
Full-text available
This paper assesses the impact of air–sea coupling on Indian Ocean tropical cyclones (TCs) by comparing a 20-year long simulation of a ¼° regional coupled ocean–atmosphere model with a twin experiment, where the atmospheric component is forced by sea surface temperature from the coupled simulation. The coupled simulation reproduces the observed spa...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Effect on Hydrological and Carbon Cycle due to two different geoengineering scheme - Sulphate geoengineering and Cirrus cloud thinning geoengineering.