Kris A Murray

Kris A Murray
Imperial College London | Imperial · Grantham Institute - Climate Change and the Environment

PhD

About

64
Publications
25,051
Reads
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3,649
Citations
Citations since 2016
29 Research Items
2828 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
Additional affiliations
January 2006 - January 2010
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
The 2022 report of the Lancet Countdown is published as the world confronts profound and concurrent systemic shocks. Countries and health systems continue to contend with the health, social, and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, while Russia's invasion of Ukraine and a persistent fossil fuel overdependence has pushed the world into global...
Article
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Empiric studies exploring the timeliness of routine vaccination in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) have gained momentum in the last decade. Nevertheless, there is emerging evidence suggesting that these studies have key measurement and methodological gaps that limit their comparability and utility. Hence, there is a need to identify, and do...
Article
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Snakebite is the only WHO-listed, not infectious neglected tropical disease (NTD), although its eco-epidemiology is similar to that of zoonotic infections: envenoming occurs after a vertebrate host contacts a human. Accordingly, snakebite risk represents the interaction between snake and human factors, but their quantification has been limited by d...
Article
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A debate has emerged over the potential socio-ecological drivers of wildlife-origin zoonotic disease outbreaks and emerging infectious disease (EID) events. This Review explores the extent to which the incidence of wildlife-origin infectious disease outbreaks, which are likely to include devastating pandemics like HIV/AIDS and COVID-19, may be link...
Preprint
Full-text available
As part of a broad One Health surveillance effort to detect novel viruses in wildlife and people, we report several paramyxoviruses sequenced primarily from bats during 2013 and 2014 in Brazil and Malaysia, including seven from which we recovered full-length genomes. Of these, six represent the first full-length paramyxovirus genomes sequenced from...
Article
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Agriculture in Africa is rapidly expanding but with this comes potential disbenefits for the environment and human health. Here, we retrospectively assess whether childhood malaria in sub-Saharan Africa varies across differing agricultural land uses after controlling for socio-economic and environmental confounders. Using a multi-model inference hi...
Article
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Mathematical models that incorporate the temperature dependence of lab-measured life history traits are increasingly being used to predict how climatic warming will affect ecto-therms, including disease vectors and other arthropods. These temperature-trait relationships are typically measured under laboratory conditions that ignore how conspecific...
Preprint
Full-text available
Snakebite is the only WHO-listed, not infectious neglected tropical disease (NTD), although its eco-epidemiology is similar to that of zoonotic infections: envenoming occurs after a vertebrate host contacts a human. Accordingly, snakebite risk represents the interaction between snake and human factors, but their quantification has been limited by d...
Article
Full-text available
Snakebite incidence at least partly depends on the biology of the snakes involved. However, studies of snake biology have been largely neglected in favour of anthropic factors, with the exception of taxonomy, which has been recognised for some decades to affect the design of antivenoms. Despite this, within-species venom variation and the unpredict...
Article
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Venomous snakebite is a neglected tropical disease that annually leads to hundreds of thousands of deaths or long-term physical and mental ailments across the developing world. Insufficient data on spatial variation in snakebite risk, incidence, human vulnerability, and accessibility of medical treatment contribute substantially to ineffective on-g...
Article
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The literature on the timeliness of childhood vaccination (i.e. vaccination at the earliest appropriate age) in low-and middle-income countries has important measurement and methodological issues that may limit their usefulness and cross comparison. We aim to conduct a comprehensive scoping review to map the existing literature with a key focus on...
Article
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Snakebite envenoming is a set of intoxication diseases that disproportionately affect people of poor socioeconomic backgrounds in tropical countries. As it is highly dependent on the environment its burden is expected to shift spatially with global anthropogenic environmental (climate, land use) and demographic change. The mechanisms underlying the...
Article
Laboratory-derived temperature dependencies of life-history traits are increasingly being used to make mechanistic predictions for how climatic warming will affect vector-borne disease dynamics, partially by affecting abundance dynamics of the vector population. These temperature-trait relationships are typically estimated from juvenile populations...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. A population′s maximal growth rate (rm) depends on the survivorship, development, and reproduction of its individuals. In ectotherms, these (functional) traits respond predictably to temperature, which provides a basis for predicting how climatic warming could affect natural populations, including disease vectors and the diseases they transmit....
Article
Full-text available
Snakebite causes more than 1.8 million envenoming cases annually and is a major cause of death in the tropics especially for poor farmers. While both social and ecological factors influence the chance encounter between snakes and people, the spatio-temporal processes underlying snakebites remain poorly explored. Previous research has heavily focuse...
Preprint
Full-text available
Laboratory-derived temperature dependencies of life history traits are increasingly being used to make mechanistic predictions for how climatic warming will affect vector-borne disease dynamics by affecting abundance dynamics of the vector population. These temperature-trait relationships are typically estimated from populations reared on optimal r...
Article
Full-text available
Vector-borne diseases remain a major contributor to the global burden of disease, while climate change is expected to exacerbate their risk. Characterising vector development rate and its spatio-temporal variation under climate change is central to assessing the changing basis of human disease risk. We develop a mechanistic phenology model and appl...
Article
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Agriculture has been implicated as a potential driver of human infectious diseases. However, the generality of disease-agriculture relationships has not been systematically assessed, hindering efforts to incorporate human health considerations into land-use and development policies. Here we perform a meta-analysis with 34 eligible studies and show...
Data
This PDF file includes: Materials and Methods - Figs. S1, S3, S4, S6, S7, and S9 to S16 - Tables S2 to S5 - Captions for figs. S2, S5, and S8 - Caption for table S1 - Captions for data S1 to S3 - References
Article
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Panzootic chytrid fungus out of Asia Species in the fungal genus Batrachochytrium are responsible for severe declines in the populations of amphibians globally. The sources of these pathogens have been uncertain. O'Hanlon et al. used genomics on a panel of more than 200 isolates to trace the source of the frog pathogen B. dendrobatidis to a hyperdi...
Article
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Zoonoses originating from wildlife represent a significant threat to global health, security and economic growth, and combatting their emergence is a public health priority. However, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying their emergence remains rudimentary. Here we update a global database of emerging infectious disease (EID) events, creat...
Chapter
Zoonotic viruses of wildlife origin have caused the majority of recent emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) that have had significant impacts on human health or economies. Animal consumption-based food systems, ranging from the harvest of free-ranging wild species (hereafter, wild harvest systems) to the in situ stocking of domestic or farmed wild a...
Article
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Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) emerged in the 1970s in Australia and the Americas, causing rapid and catastrophic declines and extinctions of naïve amphibian populations as it spread through remote rainforest and alpine regions. The description of chytridiomycosis in 1998 stimulated a large and diverse global research effort, including studies...
Article
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Significance Understanding the distributions of infectious diseases is a central public and global health objective. We show that human infectious diseases exhibit striking biogeographic grouping patterns at a global scale, reminiscent of “Wallacean” zoogeographic patterns. This result is surprising, given the global distribution and unprecedented...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases pose an important threat to wildlife. While established protocols exist for combating outbreaks of human and agricultural pathogens, appropriate management actions before, during, and after the invasion of wildlife pathogens have not been developed. We describe stage-specific goals and management actions that minimize d...
Article
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Funding Information This work is supported by the Fondation pour la Recherche sur la Biodiversit e through its Centre de Synth ese et d'Analyse sur la Biodiversit e (CESAB) and its funded working group program " Disentangling the linkages between biodiversity and emerging infectious diseases " (BIODIS), and with additional support from the internat...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are on the rise due to multiple factors, including human facilitated movement of pathogens, broad-scale landscape changes, and perturbations to ecological systems (Jones et al. 2008; Fisher et al. 2012). Epidemics in wildlife are problematic because they can lead to pathogen spillover to new host organisms, erode...
Chapter
Concern over emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and a better understanding of their causes has resulted in increasing recognition of the linkages among human, animal, and ecosystem health. It is now well recognized that human activities can promote the emergence of infectious diseases through the large-scale modification of natural environments an...
Article
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Ecological Approaches to Studying Zoonoses, Page 1 of 2 Abstract Concern over emerging infectious diseases and a better understanding of their causes have resulted in increasing recognition of the linkages among human, animal, and ecosystem health. Historically, the connection between animal and human health was understood and accepted, with the...
Article
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Unlabelled: The majority of emerging zoonoses originate in wildlife, and many are caused by viruses. However, there are no rigorous estimates of total viral diversity (here termed "virodiversity") for any wildlife species, despite the utility of this to future surveillance and control of emerging zoonoses. In this case study, we repeatedly sampled...
Article
Comparative extinction risk analysis is a common approach for assessing the relative plight of biodiversity and making conservation recommendations. However, the usefulness of such analyses for conservation practice has been questioned. One reason for underperformance may be that threats arising from global environmental changes (e.g., habitat loss...
Conference Paper
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Background/Question/Methods Approximately 23% of past Emerging Infectious Disease (EID) events can be linked to land-use change. These EIDs include outbreaks of Ebola virus, Marburg virus, rabies, HIV-AIDS, avian influenza and Yellow Fever. Increasing human land use is likely leading to biodiversity loss, and facilitating infectious disease spillo...
Article
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The pandemic amphibian disease chytridiomycosis often exhibits strong seasonality in both prevalence and disease-associated mortality once it becomes endemic. One hypothesis that could explain this temporal pattern is that simple weather-driven pathogen proliferation (population growth) is a major driver of chytridiomycosis disease dynamics. Despit...
Data
Appendices 1–6. Appendix 1, Details of the ‘weather-linked Bd proliferation model.’ Appendix 2, Multi-host infection patterns at Peter’s Creek. Appendix 3, Preliminary tests of the Random Forests modelling framework. Appendix 4, Extent of infection in the model species Litoria pearsoniana. Appendix 5, Preliminary analysis of the Litoria pearsoniana...
Article
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Chytridiomycosis is the worst disease to affect vertebrate biodiversity on record. In Australia, it is thought to have caused the extinction of four frog species, and it threatens the survival of at least 10 more. We report the current distribution and host range of this invasive disease in Australia, which is essential knowledge for conservation m...
Article
The emergence of novel viral diseases is driven by socioeconomic, demographic and environmental changes. These include land use changes such as deforestation, agricultural expansion and habitat degradation. However, the links between land use change and disease emergence are poorly understood and probably complex. In this review, we propose two hyp...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose a significant threat to human health, economic stability, and biodiversity. Despite this, the mechanisms underlying disease emergence are still not fully understood, and control measures rely heavily on mitigating the impact of EIDs after they have emerged. Here, we highlight the emergence of a zoonotic Heni...
Article
Confronting the risk of emerging infectious diseases of wildlife is an important objective for biosecurity and conservation. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), cause of the emerging disease chytridiomycosis, has been associated with amphibian declines and extinctions globally. Characterizing Bd's host range is important for understanding communit...
Article
Full-text available
Intra-specific communication in anuran amphibians is primarily achieved with vocal signals (Duellman and Trueb 1994). However, some species also use visual displays for interand/ or intra-sexual communication (Hodl and Amezquita 2001). Such displays include movement of the fore and/ or hindlimbs (e.g. hand-waving, foot-flagging and/or legflicking),...
Article
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1. Altered global climates in the 21st century pose serious threats for biological systems and practical actions are needed to mount a response for species at risk. 2. We identify management actions from across the world and from diverse disciplines that are applicable to minimizing loss of amphibian biodiversity under climate change. Actions were...
Article
1. Emerging infectious diseases can have serious consequences for wildlife populations, ecosystem structure and biodiversity. Predicting the spatial patterns and potential impacts of diseases in free-ranging wildlife are therefore important for planning, prioritizing and implementing research and management actions. 2. We developed spatial models o...
Article
1. Correlative species distribution models can be used to produce spatially explicit estimates of environmental suitability for organisms. This process can provide meaningful information for a range of purposes (e.g. estimating a species’ current or future distribution, estimating dispersal limits, predicting occupancy for conservation planning) bu...
Article
Full-text available
Spread of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which causes chytridiomycosis, has resulted in the extinction of frogs, but the distribution of Bd is incompletely known. We trialled the survey protocol for Bd by attempting to systematically map its distribution in Queensland, Australia. Bd was easily detected in known in...
Article
Full-text available
In studies of extinction risk, it is often insufficient to conclude that species with narrow ranges or small clutch sizes require prioritized protection. To improve conservation outcomes, we also need to know which threats interact with these traits to endanger some species but not others. In this study, we integrated the spatial patterns of key th...
Article
Full-text available
Chytridiomycosis is the worst disease to affect vertebrate biodiversity on record. In Australia, it is thought to have caused the extinction of four frog species, and it threatens the survival of at least 10 more. We report the current distribution and host range of this invasive disease in Australia, which is essential knowledge for conservation m...
Article
Estimating disease-associated mortality and transmission processes is difficult in free-ranging wildlife but important for understanding disease impacts and dynamics and for informing management decisions. In a capture-mark-recapture study, we used a PCR-based diagnostic test in combination with multistate models to provide the first estimates of d...
Article
Gidgee skinks (Egernia stokesii) form large social aggregations in rocky outcrops across the Flinders Ranges in South Australia. Group members share refuges (rock crevices), which may promote parasite transmission. We measured connectivity of individuals in networks constructed from patterns of common crevice use and observed patterns of parasitism...
Article
Full-text available
The Australian skink lizard Egernia stokesii lives in aggregations of up to 17 individuals. Previously, at one site, these aggregations have been shown to comprise paired unrelated individuals and several cohorts of their young. To investigate whether social structuring in this species is a response to ecological conditions or is phylogenetically c...
Article
Full-text available
We explored patterns of infection of three apicomplexan blood parasites with different transmission mechanisms in 46 social groups across seven populations of the Australian lizard, Egernia stokesii. There was higher aggregation of infections within social groups for Hemolivia, transmitted by ticks, and Schellackia, either tick-transmitted or direc...