Kremena Burkhard

Kremena Burkhard
Leibniz Universität Hannover · Ludwig Franzius Institute of Hydraulic, Estuarine and Coastal Engineering

PhD Geography

About

19
Publications
11,072
Reads
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830
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
565 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Introduction
My main research interests are the implementation of different spatial analysis techniques, models, other tools and different data sources for the spatial assessment of ecosystem services and sustainability indicators and the ways they are influenced by changes in the socio-ecological system. I have been focusing on the translation of hydrological and other environmental models’ outputs into the language of ecosystem service and sustainability for the needs of water and environmental management in order to produce stakeholder-relevant information that can support policy and decision making.
Additional affiliations
February 2021 - present
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Impact of uncertainties in climate change impact modelling, eco-hydrological modelling and ecosystem services scenarios on the decision-making process.
July 2017 - present
Leibniz Universität Hannover
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Virtual water accounting, water footprint and sustainability assessment of agricultural products, governance practices, water-related SDG's.
February 2017 - March 2017
Leibniz Universität Hannover
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • Comparison of tools for environmental modeling
Education
January 2012 - June 2015
Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
Field of study
  • Physical Geography
September 2005 - June 2011

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Water provision and distribution are subject to conflicts between users worldwide, with agriculture as a major driver of discords. Water sensitive ecosystems and their services are often impaired by man-made water shortage. Nevertheless, they are not sufficiently included in sustainability or risk assessments and neglected when it comes to distribu...
Article
Full-text available
Information on soil hydraulic properties (e.g. soil moisture pressure relationships and hydraulic conductivity) is valuable for a wide range of disciplines including hydrology, ecology, environmental management and agriculture. However, this information is often not readily available as direct measurements are costly and time-consuming. Furthermore...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystems provide a range of services, including water purification, erosion prevention, and flood risk mitigation, that are important to water resource managers. But as a sector, water resources management has been slow to incorporate ecosystem protection and restoration, for a variety of reasons, although related concepts such as nature-based so...
Presentation
Full-text available
The German North Sea coast is characterised by continuous dikes and below sea level elevation of a big share of the terrestrial land. The system is vulnerable to climate change and specifically to predicted increase in sea levels and extreme weather events and changes in seasonal precipitation. Therefore, adaptation measures to the predicted change...
Presentation
Full-text available
Continuous agricultural intensification severely threatens water ecosystems, their services and biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. Increased irrigation drains streams, lakes, floodplains and wetlands beyond their carrying capacity. International legislation and agendas such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) promote sustainability st...
Presentation
Full-text available
The German North Sea coast is characterised by continuous dikes and below sea level elevation of a big share of the terrestrial land, which is drained by a complex system of canals, sluices and pumps. The area is vulnerable to climate change and specifically to increasing sea levels, changes in seasonal precipitation and increased frequency of extr...
Presentation
Full-text available
Existing established ES typologies provide a robust basis for research and methodological work but can also be obstructive when very case-relevant objectives are being addressed. The same applies for transdisciplinary work, where complex typological systems can be overwhelming for the involved stakeholders. However, very generalised and communicati...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem services (ES) mapping is becoming mainstream in many sustainability assessments, but its impact on real world decision-making is still limited. Robustness, end-user relevance and transparency have been identified as key attributes needed for effective ES mapping. However, these requirements are not always met due to multiple challenges, r...
Article
Full-text available
We compared and contrasted 11 European case studies to identify challenges and opportunities toward the operationalization of marine and coastal ecosystem service (MCES) assessments in Europe. This work is the output of a panel convened by the Marine Working Group of the Ecosystem Services Partnership in September 2016. The MCES assessments were us...
Chapter
Full-text available
The chapter deals with some of the common issues of inter/transdisciplinary working groups, but also how these problems might be altered for better collective understanding and integration.
Chapter
Full-text available
The application of hydrological models for the assessment of ecosystem services provides multiple opportunities for their quantitative analysis. Furthermore, Geographic Information System (GIS)-based models provide the possibility for spatially explicit analyses of model outputs and their representation in maps. A broadly applied and freely availab...
Article
Full-text available
Quantifying, modelling and mapping ecosystem services is an important step to the application of ecosystem services in practice and decision making. Watersheds are functional entities that provide an appropriate spatial scale for water fl ow analysis and integrate all the processes that occur within their boundaries. Multiple ecosystem functions oc...
Chapter
Full-text available
There is great need for accurate and practical methods to assess the conditions of ecosystems, and the possible results of their interaction with social systems. The generation and interpretation of quantitative data for ecosystem service analysis is still not well established. Ecosystem service analyses demand an interdisciplinary approach that in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The present paper will examine many of the problems and characteristics that a cartographer should consider when starting the preparation of a 3D map of any kind and particularly one used in architectural applications. Moreover, it will present problems of perception as an important factor in selecting appropriate techniques and methods for conveyi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
The aim of this project is to highlight the advances and challenges in incorporating the Ecosystem Services paradigm — linking ecosystems to human benefits —into Water Resource Management, by selecting multi- and interdisciplinary efforts to measure, plan for, incentivize, and implement projects to enhance water-related ES in basins around the world. This is part of an ongoing Special Issue in Environmental Management (Springer), proposed by the lead team of the ESP Sectoral Working Group 5 on ES in Water Management (SWG 5).
Project
Das Verbundprojekt zwischen drei niedersächsischen Universitäten etabliert Reallabore an ausgewählten Standorten entlang der niedersächsischen Küste mit dem Ziel, ökosystemstärkenden Küstenschutz systematisch zu erforschen. [EN] The joint research project between three Lower Saxon universities establishes real-world laboratories along the coast of Lower Saxony to systematically investigate ecosystem strengthening coastal protection aspects.
Project
The ViWA research theme finds itself in the center of the water-food-energy nexus. Its nature is at the same time local and global. It therefore calls for a transdisciplinary research approach, which integrates methodologies and knowledge from different science disciplines, new global data sources, new global modeling approaches and the expertise of stakeholders from international administrative entities and companies, which share the same local and at the same time global view in the issue. ViWA aims at developing and using a global, high-spatial and -temporal resolution, remote sensing based management and monitoring system for the efficiency and sustainability of water use in agriculture and competing sectors. This enables to transparently and neutrally assess the progress in achieving water-related SDGs through more efficient use of water. The monitored high resolution data allows ViWA to consider both the “global” and the “local” in developing, formulating and analyzing trade-offs of practice-relevant solution options for a more sustainable and efficient use of water resources including a more environment-friendly trade with virtual water. To achieve its goals the project aims at the following targets: Target 1: Identify and quantify the current use of scarce water resources, the water use efficiency and the agricultural yields on an annual and global level and with high spatial and temporal resolution through a new combined monitoring and modeling approach based on Copernicus satellite remote sensing data. Target 2: Assess and evaluate the economic consequences and (in-)efficiency of the current water use and water allocation, including trade in virtual water for agriculture, industry and water management based on the monitored data. Target 3: Investigate consequences of moving towards a sustainable and efficient water use for the regional welfare of water rich and water poor countries both with respect to locally sustainable water use as with respect to global virtual water trade. Target 4: Assess the vulnerability of agriculture and ecosystems to climate variability with special emphasis on water availability. Target 5: Identify regional hot-spots of unsustainable water use in order to describe institutional obstacles for a sustainable and efficient water use. Target 6: Identify trade-offs between the commercial water use and protection of ecosystem services. Target 7: Develop solution options for sustainable water management with the help of scenarios and their trade-offs investigated for selected use-cases.