Kostas Kotsakis

Kostas Kotsakis
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | AUTH · School of History and Archaeology

PhD

About

63
Publications
54,195
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,964
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - December 2015
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the study is to investigate mitochondrial diversity in Neolithic Greece and its relation to hunter-gatherers and farmers who populated the Danubian Neolithic expansion axis. We sequenced 42 mitochondrial palaeogenomes from Greece and analysed them together with European set of 328 mtDNA sequences dating from the Early to the Final Neolit...
Article
Full-text available
Organic-tempered pottery is considered characteristic for the early pottery assemblages in most parts of Southwest Asia and Southeast Europe. The aim of the present paper is to explore: (a) the chronological consistency of this practice, i.e. is it always related to the early assemblages and how intensively was it employed by the various communitie...
Article
Full-text available
Specialized and systematic underwater fieldwork at the prehistoric site of Ploča Mičov Grad at Gradište (North Macedonia) on the eastern shore of Lake Ohrid was undertaken in 2018 and 2019. It has substantiated the archeological site’s outstanding preservation condition, and furthermore proven the numerous construction timbers’ suitability for dend...
Article
Full-text available
The Cycladic, the Minoan, and the Helladic (Mycenaean) cultures define the Bronze Age (BA) of Greece. Urbanism, complex social structures, craft and agricultural specialization, and the earliest forms of writing characterize this iconic period. We sequenced six Early to Middle BA whole genomes, along with 11 mitochondrial genomes, sampled from the...
Article
Full-text available
Recent advances in recording equipment, software solutions and intra-site applications have supported the widespread integration of 3D spatial technologies within archaeological fieldwork. However, the heavy dependence on digital technology to organize excavation research does not come without costs, especially in the case of long-term excavation p...
Article
Full-text available
This paper applies phytolith analysis to bedrock installations at the Early Neolithic site of Paliambela Kolindros in Northern Greece. The phytolith remains retrieved from these installations document for the first time in Greece that the cylindrical cavities dug into the bedrock were used as mortars for pounding and dehusking wheat inflorescences....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Τhe Neolithic site of Thermi is located to the northeast of the modern village. The settlement was dated from the Middle to Late Neolithic II, according to pottery. Thermi is a flat and extended settlement that consists of more than 70 pits of different dimensions. Outside the pits open stone paved areas exist. The pottery presented in this paper w...
Article
Studies relating to pottery primary forming techniques are relatively scarce in the field of ceramic studies. This is, in part, due to the difficulty in obtaining information about the inner structures of pots in a non-destructive way. Methodologies which have been applied previously (mainly macroscopic observation and X-ray radiography) are subjec...
Article
Full-text available
Strontium isotope ratios are widely used in archaeology to differentiate between local and non-local populations. Herein, strontium isotope ratios of 36 human tooth enamels from seven archaeological sites spanning the Early to Late Neolithic of northern Greece (7th-5th millennia B.C.E.) were analysed with the aim of providing new information relati...
Chapter
Full-text available
Based on the pottery analysis of sites from central and western Macedonia, it can be argued that there is a close connection between these regions and Thessaly during the Early and Middle Neolithic. However, this wide network of communication may have been remodeled, as manifested in the pottery. For instance, sites like Revenia, Ritini, and Vareme...
Article
The emergence of agriculture in Greece denotes the start of the Neolithic in Europe, however, little is known about dietary practices in the region. Archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological remains indicate reliance on cereals and pulses, together with meat-based subsistence practices, including sheep/goat and pig husbandry. Preliminary investigation...
Article
Full-text available
Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we p...
Article
Full-text available
Remains of the houses in the Late Neolithic of Northern Greece are as a rule less well preserved than in some other regions of Greece such as Thessaly. The site of Stavroupoli-Thessaloniki is a settlement with a dense habitation pattern, but poorly preserved architecture. Several habitation phases have been distinguished, dating to the Middle and L...
Article
Full-text available
The pressures on honeybee (Apis mellifera) populations, resulting from threats by modern pesticides, parasites, predators and diseases, have raised awareness of the economic importance and critical role this insect plays in agricultural societies across the globe. However, the association of humans with A. mellifera predates post-industrial-revolut...
Article
Full-text available
The authors discuss the first evidence for the use of birch-bark tar on Late Neolithic pottery from Greece. This appears to have been used for two different purposes, to seal a fracture and to line the interior walls. The authors also discuss other possible uses.
Article
Full-text available
Farming and sedentism first appear in southwest Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithisation of Europe. Here we present...
Article
Full-text available
The pressures on honeybee (Apis mellifera) populations, resulting from threats by modern pesticides, parasites, predators and diseases, have raised awareness of the economic importance and critical role this insect plays in agricultural societies across the globe. However, the association of humans with A. mellifera predates post-industrial-revolut...
Article
Full-text available
A number of recent significant field projects in Northern Greece, particularly in Macedonia, have revealed a wealth of new data and have shed light on the Neolithic of the region, especially on its earliest periods. Apart from clarification of major chronological issues, we possess now, for the first time, compelling contextualized evidence for eve...
Article
Full-text available
A combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry approach has been used for the characterization of two lumps of resin and 17 adsorbed residues on Roman-age vessels, mainly amphorae, from northern Greece. The data show that a diterpenic resin from plants of the Pinacae family is the main component of the tarry material associated with the analyzed a...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeology is a science where geographical and spatial factors are of capital importance; in this context Geo-visualization and Archaeology provide interesting challenges for each other and they can both benefit from a combined approach of their interests. Archaeological excavations in particular constitute an excellent field for geo-visualization...
Article
Full-text available
Museums are interested in the digitizing of their collections not only for the sake of preserving the cultural heritage, but to also make the information content accessible to the wider public in a manner that is attractive. Emerging technologies, such as VR, AR and Web3D are widely used to create virtual museum exhibitions both in a museum environ...
Article
Full-text available
The domestication of cattle, sheep and goats had already taken place in the Near East by the eighth millennium BC. Although there would have been considerable economic and nutritional gains from using these animals for their milk and other products from living animals—that is, traction and wool—the first clear evidence for these appears much later,...
Article
Full-text available
The domestication of cattle, sheep and goats had already taken place in the Near East by the eighth millennium BC. Although there would have been considerable economic and nutritional gains from using these animals for their milk and other products from living animals-that is, traction and wool-the first clear evidence for these appears much later,...
Article
The domestication of cattle, sheep and goats had already taken place in the Near East by the eighth millennium bc1, 2, 3. Although there would have been considerable economic and nutritional gains from using these animals for their milk and other products from living animals—that is, traction and wool—the first clear evidence for these appears much...
Article
Full-text available
Organic residues associated with Neolithic pottery from two Late Neolithic sites, Paliambela and Makriyalos (Northern Greece), were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The study aimed at identifying the origin of the tar used for waterproofing and gluing broken pots. Reference tars were prepared in laboratory conditions by pyrolysis o...
Article
Full-text available
Across a range of archaeological projects in Northern Greece, a context-based system, which has much in common with similar stratigraphic methods applied elsewhere in the world, is in use to record the excavation process. Here, we discuss a formal data model and complete digital workflow for the documentation of this process in 3D using the prehist...
Chapter
Full-text available
The present project focuses on red monochrome pottery (A1) from House 50 (Sesklo A) and House A (Sesklo B), securely dated to Middle Neolithic III. The objectives of this project were: i) to reconstruct the chaîne opératoire through the comprehension of the technological choices made at each step of the production process (raw materials composition...
Article
Full-text available
Results of X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, thin section analysis and scanning electron microscopy applied to the neolithic pottery of Sesklo indicated the existence of quality variation in pottery, which seems to be the result of using different raw materials and different technological procedures. This differentiation has been observed temp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The use and the importance of dye is attested as early as the Geometric period, and there is important evidence that the production of purple dye dates from the Middle Minoan period. Nonetheless, the archaeological data from many prehistoric settlements are relatively obscure. The discovery of a small quantity of murex shells is frequently interpre...
Chapter
Full-text available
Anthropological discussion on food, eating and drinking, particularly lively in the last decades, clearly shows the multiple social functions and meanings of the consumption of food and drink. Meals, whether as part of everyday food consumption activities within the domestic domain or consumed on special occasions at a household or community level,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The excavation project of Paliambela Kolindros, Greece, in the past five years has developed a digital recording methodology through 2D photogrammetry that has resulted in the: • systematic collection of excavation unit and artefact co-ordinates • fast and detailed production of digital excavation plans and sections • increase in the photographic d...
Article
Full-text available
During the last decade the contribution of GIS technology in recording and analysis of archaeological data has been significant. Although, however, the information that archaeologists record has a deeply 3D character, the analyses within GIS packages rely upon a 2D abstraction of reality. The approaches proposed so far for 3D archaeological GISs re...
Article
Full-text available
Recent development in chemical analyses of organic remains in archaeological cera- mics gives new possibilities to the study of pottery use. They could be of crucial importance in as- sessing vessel's use, especially when combined with contextual, technomorphological and use-altera- tion analysis data. Using the example of the late Neolithic potter...
Article
Full-text available
The paper reviews the status of the Mesolithic/Neolitihc interface in Greece. It is argued that the old dichotomy between “indigenists” and “diffusionists” concerning the neolithization of Greece is simplistic. Instead it is proposed that the discussion should be focused on two separate issues: one factual, emphasizing the form of phenomena and the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Cet article propose de resumer l'etat des recherches et les principaux resultats des projets d'etude de ces deux dernieres decennies sur le Neolithique et l'Age du Bronze des provinces grecques de Thessalie, de Macedoine, de Thrace et d'Epire
Article
Discriminant analyses using size variables and ratios were performed on populations consisting of modern wild and cultivated grape seeds before and after charring, and under various charring conditions. Four formulae were constructed, based on the charred population. The excellent predictive power of the models permits the identification of charred...
Article
RUNSECT is a computer program that produces diagrams of excavation units from sites that have complicated stratigraphy. It can also plot on these diagrams the distribution of single finds and the density or proportions of classes of finds. Its main features are explained and an example is presented.
Article
Full-text available
The settlement of Mandalo is situated ca 20 km NW of ancient Pella. Five years of excavation there have produced a series of 19 radiocarbon determinations that permit one to define the lower and the upper limit of occupation on the site. According to this evidence the start of the occupation must be placed at 4600 BC, which places the site within t...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
The Neolithic is a key topic in archaeological research. The high number of research teams focused on its study, the large number of archaeological sites excavated each year and the huge number of articles published on the topic, are clear examples of the interest that this particular period arouses. Despite the high number of published studies, several research questions continue to arise in relation to the following points: the origin and the development of the Neolithization process; the role of Mesolithic hunter-gatherer communities in the processes; the effects of the climatic changes on the landscape and the key points of the agricultural model. The traditional historical-cultural proposals about Neolithic emergence have been revised, changed or reformulated thanks to the improvement of the archaeological field techniques, and to the spread of new and more precise analytical techniques from Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The amount of analysis and papers is dramatically increased, and is getting very difficult being updated about them. Therefore, it is becoming necessary to organize monographic meetings around common topics. Considering all these aspects, NeoNet pretends to build up a common environment for the discussion of the origin, development and consolidation of Neolithic communities along the Mediterranean, from Near East to Portugal, funded by the Spanish call Red temática (Thematic Network) in the framework of the Programa Estatal de Generación de Conocimiento y Fortalecimiento Científico y Tecnológico del Sistema de I+D+I del Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades (Spanish Program for the Generation of Knowledge and Scientific and Technological development for the Spanish System of Research, Development and Innovation of the Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities). A project in which a scientific dissemination program is incorporated for a non-academic public
Project
European societies today face unprecedented environmental change. Understanding how human societies responded to past challenges of environmental change relates to the interface between culture and environment. The EXPLO project proposes a novel interdisciplinary approach to investigate key questions regarding the interaction between past human ways of life, land use and the wider environment through a unique combination of archaeological, biological and dynamic mathematical modelling approaches. Archaeological prehistoric sites in lakes of northern Greece and the southern Balkans provide an excellent opportunity to investigate rich archives of societal and environmental change in the cradle of European farming. Natural lake sediments and submerged prehistoric settlements offer exceptional preservation conditions and uniquely holistic insights into past anthroposphere, biosphere and geosphere dynamics. More than 8000 years ago, technological and social breakthroughs allowed the introduction of farming from western Asia to Greece and thus for the first time to Europe; however, so far there is no highresolution picture of how this revolutionary innovation interacted with the environment, including its long-term consequences. New underwater archaeological research will allow the construction of highly precise settlement chronologies on the basis of dendrochronology, radiocarbon dating and Bayesian modelling. On-site information from excavations will be combined with off-site palaeoenvironmental data from the same lakes to investigate past adaptation strategies to the environment as well as the effects of past societies on their environments. Dynamic models integrating archaeological contexts and palaeoenvironmental data will open up the opportunity to investigate vulnerability, resilience, tipping points and thresholds of ancient agrarian economies, with implications for future food systems under a rapidly changing climate. Lab: Albert Hafner's Lab
Project
European societies today face unprecedented environmental change. Understanding how human societies responded to past challenges of environmental change relates to the interface between culture and environment. The EXPLO project proposes a novel interdisciplinary approach to investigate key questions regarding the interaction between past human ways of life, land use and the wider environment through a unique combination of archaeological, biological and dynamic mathematical modelling approaches. Archaeological prehistoric sites in lakes of northern Greece and the southern Balkans provide an excellent opportunity to investigate rich archives of societal and environmental change in the cradle of European farming. Natural lake sediments and submerged prehistoric settlements offer exceptional preservation conditions and uniquely holistic insights into past anthroposphere, biosphere and geosphere dynamics. More than 8000 years ago, technological and social breakthroughs allowed the introduction of farming from western Asia to Greece and thus for the first time to Europe; however, so far there is no highresolution picture of how this revolutionary innovation interacted with the environment, including its long-term consequences. New underwater archaeological research will allow the construction of highly precise settlement chronologies on the basis of dendrochronology, radiocarbon dating and Bayesian modelling. On-site information from excavations will be combined with off-site palaeoenvironmental data from the same lakes to investigate past adaptation strategies to the environment as well as the effects of past societies on their environments. Dynamic models integrating archaeological contexts and palaeoenvironmental data will open up the opportunity to investigate vulnerability, resilience, tipping points and thresholds of ancient agrarian economies, with implications for future food systems under a rapidly changing climate.