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Korbinian Breinl

Korbinian Breinl
TU Wien | TU Wien · Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management

PhD (Dr. rer. nat.)

About

28
Publications
19,117
Reads
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893
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - present
TU Wien
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Engineering Hydrology
July 2016 - July 2018
Uppsala University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Postdoctoral Researcher in Hydrology, Research fellow at the Centre for Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS - www.cnds.se)
July 2016 - present
Uppsala University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Teaching in the courses: (i) Groundwater and Surface Water Modelling (ii) Hydrological Processes (iii) Natural Hazards and Disasters
Education
October 2011 - January 2015
University of Salzburg
Field of study
  • Geoinformatics
October 2002 - November 2008
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Field of study
  • Physical Geography (major), Physics (minor), Ecoclimatology (minor)

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to explore how rainfall mechanisms and catchment characteristics shape the relationship between rainfall and flood probabilities. We propose a new approach of comparing intensity-duration-frequency statistics of maximum annual rainfall with those of maximum annual streamflow in order to infer the catchment behavior for runo...
Article
Full-text available
Dry spells are sequences of days without precipitation. They can have negative implications for societies, including water security and agriculture. For example, changes in their duration and within-year timing can pose a threat to food production and wildfire risk. Conversely, wet spells are sequences of days with precipitation above a certain thr...
Article
Full-text available
We estimate areal reduction factors (ARFs, the ratio of catchment rainfall and point rainfall) varying in space and time using a fixed-area method for Austria and link them to the dominating rainfall processes in the region. We particularly focus on two sub-regions in the West and East of the country, where stratiform and convective rainfall proces...
Article
Full-text available
We compare statistical and hydrological methods to estimate design floods by proposing a framework that is based on assuming a synthetic scenario considered as ‘truth’ and use it as a benchmark for analysing results. To illustrate the framework, we used probability model selection and model averaging as statistical methods, while continuous simulat...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is the outcome of a community initiative to identify major unsolved scientific problems in hydrology motivated by a need for stronger harmonisation of research efforts. The procedure involved a public consultation through on-line media, followed by two workshops through which a large number of potential science questions were collated, p...
Article
Full-text available
The design of flood defence structures requires the estimation of flood water levels corresponding to a given probability of exceedance, or return period. In river flood management, this estimation is often done by statistically analysing the frequency of flood discharge peaks. This typically requires three main steps. First, direct measurements of...
Article
Full-text available
Study region: This study focuses on two study areas: the Province of Trento (Italy; 6200 km²), and entire Sweden (447000km²). The Province of Trento is a complex mountainous area including subarctic, humid continental and Tundra climates. Sweden, instead, is mainly dominated by a subarctic climate in the North and an oceanic climate in the South. S...
Article
The expansion of reservoirs to cope with droughts and water shortages is hotly debated in many places around the world. We argue that there are two counterintuitive dynamics that should be considered in this debate: supply–demand cycles and reservoir effects. Supply–demand cycles describe instances where increasing water supply enables higher water...
Article
Full-text available
This study compares model averaging and model selection methods to estimate design floods, while accounting for the observation error that is typically associated with annual maximum flow data. Model selection refers to methods where a single distribution function is chosen based on prior knowledge or by means of selection criteria. Model averaging...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Climate change, globalization, urbanization, social isolation, and increased interconnectedness between physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk reduction (DRR). Subsequently, economic losses caused by natural hazards are increasing in many regions of the world, despite scientific progress, persiste...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change, globalization, urbanization, social isolation, and increased interconnectedness between physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk reduction (DRR). Subsequently, economic losses caused by natural hazards are increasing in many regions of the world, despite scientific progress, persistent policy...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change, globalization, urbanization, social isolation, and increased interconnectedness between physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk reduction (DRR). Subsequently, economic losses caused by natural hazards are increasing in many regions of the world, despite scientific progress, persistent policy...
Article
Full-text available
Stochastic weather generators can generate very long time series of weather patterns, which are indispensable in earth sciences, ecology and climate research. Yet, both their potential and limitations remain largely unclear because past research has typically focused on eclectic case studies at small spatial scales in temperate climates. In additio...
Article
Full-text available
Flood type classification is an optimal tool to cluster floods with similar meteorological triggering conditions. Under climate change these flood types may change differently as well as new flood types develop. This paper presents a new methodology to classify flood types, particularly for use in climate change impact studies. A weather generator...
Article
Full-text available
This paper deals with the question whether a lumped hydrological model driven with lumped daily precipitation time series from a univariate single-site weather generator can produce equally good results, compared to using a multivariate multi-site weather generator, where synthetic precipitation is first generated at multiple sites and subsequently...
Article
Full-text available
Human settlements are often at risk from multiple hydro-meteorological hazards, which include fluvial floods, short-time extreme precipitation (leading to ′pluvial′ floods), or coastal floods. In the past, considerable scientific effort has been devoted to assessing fluvial floods. Only recently have methods been developed to assess the hazard and...
Article
Full-text available
Debris flows and flash floods are often preceded by intense, convective rainfall. The establishment of reliable rainfall thresholds is an important component for quantitative hazard and risk assessment, and for the development of an early warning system. Traditional empirical thresholds based on peak intensity, duration and antecedent rainfall can...
Article
Full-text available
Stochastic weather generators simulate synthetic weather data while maintaining statistical properties of the observations. A new semi-parametric algorithm for multi-site precipitation has been published recently by Breinl et al. (), who used a univariate Markov process to simulate precipitation occurrence at multiple sites for two small rain gauge...
Poster
Urban flooding can have various sources including floods from a river (’fluvial flooding’), from heavy rainfall usually from convective storms (’pluvial flooding’) or from high tides (’storm surge’). Although awareness of pluvial flooding in the scientific community and among policymakers has been increasing, the term ’flooding’ is still often seen...
Article
Full-text available
Debris flows and flash floods are often preceded by intense, convective rainfall. The establishment of reliable rainfall thresholds is an important component for quantitative hazard and risk assessment, and for the development of an early warning system. Traditional empirical thresholds based on peak intensity, duration and antecedent rainfall can...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike single-site precipitation generators, multi-site precipitation generators make it possible to reproduce the space-time variation of precipitation at several sites. The extension of single-site approaches to multiple sites is a challenging task, and has led to a large variety of different model philosophies for multi-site models. This paper p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A key component in risk assessments is quantifying the probability of occurrence and the intensity of the hazards, which will alter with climate change. However, before future changes in these hazards can be determined, the current relationship between the hazard and the meteorological trigger should be understood. It is known that intense short du...
Article
Unlike fluvial flooding, pluvial flooding can occur almost anywhere, especially in areas with depressions in the topography and flow paths on the surface. Pluvial flooding is defined as flooding that results from rainfall-generated overland flow before the water enters a river. It is usually associated with rainstorm events >30mm/h. Although a pluv...
Article
Full-text available
There is an increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in expanding international insurance markets such as India, China and Thailand. This reflects the combination of an increase in exposures in these territories as industry intensifies and urban development expands, as well as several notable natural catastrophes affecting these areas over the...
Article
Full-text available
Mass-movements and floods are hydro-meteorological hazards that can have catastrophic effects on communities living in mountainous areas prone to these disastrous events. Environmental, climate and socio-economic changes are expected to affect the tempo-spatial patterns of hydro-meteorological hazards and associated risks in Europe. These changes a...
Poster
Allianz Re and JBA Consulting have developed a new flood risk model for major metropolitan areas in India.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Floods are among the costliest of all natural hazards. The June 2013 flood in Central Europe, for example, incurred more than EUR 12 billion of economic losses, and flood risks are expected to increase significantly in the future. Reliable approaches for estimating flood probabilities in space and time are needed for optimising flood risk management. For almost a century, the standard method of flood estimation has been the purely statistical “flood frequency analysis”. The method does not account for the spatio-temporal behaviour of floods which, however, is essential for trans-regional flood planning as stipulated in the EU Flood Directive (2007/60/EC). Also, flooding is a physical process in space and time, so future flood risk assessment requires a better understanding of the physical basis behind the space-time characteristics of flood probabilities. These have been explored only by a few studies, e.g. by coupling weather models with runoff models, but only at small spatial scales and ignoring the space-time characteristics of the weather fields, hydrological processes and flood peaks. My project “Space-Time scAling of the Rainfall to FLOOD transformation” (STARFLOOD) responds to this research gap by investigating, for the first time, how the probabilities of rainfall transform into probabilities of floods from a space-time perspective, and how they can be simulated by space-time stochastic weather models at large spatial scales. STARFLOOD is highly innovative as it (i) explores the performance of the full cascade of rainfall to flood probabilities, (ii) explores the physical causes of flood probabilities and (iii) significantly improves the understanding of the scaling behaviour of hydrological processes. STARFLOOD will become a pioneering framework for the improved implementation of the EU Flood Directive and thus significantly advance future trans-regional flood risk management across Europe.
Archived project
http://www.changes-itn.eu The CHANGES network (Changing Hydro-meteorological Risks – as Analyzed by a New Generation of European Scientists) aimed to develop an advanced understanding of how global changes (related to environmental and climate change as well as socio-economical change) will affect the temporal and spatial patterns of hydro-meteorological hazards and associated risks in Europe; how these changes can be assessed, modelled, and incorporated in sustainable risk management strategies, focusing on spatial planning, emergency preparedness and risk communication. The MCITN was inter-disciplinary and inter-sectoral by its nature. Active stakeholders’ participation and the dissemination of the project results were important features of the project. High-level training facilities as well as scientific and technological excellence were provided to the next generation of researchers in the field of hazard and risk management. The results of the CHANGES network contributed to the Topical Action numbers 2 and 3 of the Hyogo Framework for Action of the UN-ISDR, as risk assessment and management, combined with innovation and education are considered essential to confront the impacts of future environmental changes.
Project
STEEP STREAMS addresses the problem of the risk analysis and of the protection and prevention strategy relevant to debris flows, accounting for the effects of climate change.