Konrad Greinwald

Konrad Greinwald
University of Freiburg | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg · Biology/ Geobotany

PhD
Lecturer

About

14
Publications
1,883
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
103
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
103 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Soil hydrologic processes play an important role in the hydro-pedo-geomorphological feedback cycle of landscape evolution. Soil properties and subsurface flow paths both change over time, but due to a lack of observations, subsurface water flow paths are often not properly represented in soil and landscape evolution models. We investigated the evol...
Preprint
Full-text available
Soil hydrologic processes play an important role in the hydro-pedo-geomorphological feedback cycle of landscape evolution. Soil properties and subsurface flow paths both change over time, but due to lack of observations subsurface water flow paths are often not properly represented in soil and landscape evolution models. We investigated the evoluti...
Article
Full-text available
Soil development and erosion are important and opposing processes in the evolution of high-mountainous landscapes, though their dynamics are not fully understood. We compared soil development between a calcareous and a siliceous chronosequence in the central Swiss Alps at high altitudes, which both cover soil formation over the Holocene. We calcula...
Article
Full-text available
Aims The stability of hillslopes is an essential ecosystem service, especially in alpine regions with soils prone to erosion. One key variable controlling hillslope stability is soil aggregate stability. We aimed at identifying dominant controls of vegetation parameters on aggregate stability and analysed their importance for soil aggregate stabili...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hydrologic processes play an important role in the hydro-pedo-geomorphological feedback cycle of landscape evolution. Soil properties and subsurface flow paths change over time, but due to lack of observations important hydrologic processes such as water flow paths are often not properly considered in soil and landscape evolution studies. We invest...
Thesis
Full-text available
Feedbacks among vegetation dynamics, pedogenesis, and topographic development affect the Earth's Critical Zone, which is the thin layer between the top of vegetation and the bottom of groundwater. The interactions between the different processes form a feedback cycle, in which plant life changes together with animals, soil, and the abiotic environm...
Article
Full-text available
Questions Primary plant succession is expected to be driven by habitat filtering and competitive exclusion. However, such findings typically come from experimental or single‐site case studies. As a result, we lack field studies that investigate the functional community structures across successional series with differing site conditions. Here, we a...
Article
Full-text available
Investigating changes in belowground functional plant traits is an important step towards a better understanding of vegetation dynamics during primary succession. However, in alpine glacier fore-lands, we still lack an accurate assessment of plant rooting patterns. In this study, we established two proglacial chronosequences with contrasting bedroc...
Article
High mountainous areas are geomorphologically active environments which are strongly shaped by redistribution of sediments and soils. With the projected climate warming in the 21st century and the continued retreat of glaciers, the area of newly exposed, highly erodible sediments and soils will increase. This presents a need to better understand an...
Article
The near-surface saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is an important hydrological characteristic because it determines surface infiltration rates and the vertical and lateral redistribution of water in the soil. However, there is comparatively little knowledge about the changes in Ksat during landscape development and how the co-evolution of bi...
Article
Soil chronosequences in Alpine areas have often been applied to trace physical, mineralogical and chemical soil properties over time. How the soil pore system of undisturbed soils evolves, however, has not yet been clarified. We therefore investigated two soil chronosequences in the Swiss Alps spanning a time period from a few decades up to the Ear...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
HILLSlope Chronosequence And Process Evolution (HILLSCAPE) is a colaborative multidisciplinary research project of the University of Zurich, the University of Freiburg and the German Research Centre for Geosciences The HILLSCAPE project focuses on the vertical and lateral redistribution of water and matter along hillslopes and how this redistribution affects and is affected by soil, vegetation and landscape development. The coevolution of these processes is a novel and challenging research field. The overall research question of the project is: How does the hillslope feedback cycle evolve in the first 10,000 years and how is this related to the evolution of hillslope structure, including plant cover? http://hillscape.ch/
Project
Human activities and climate change are rapidly changing the earths surface. However, our understanding of how soils change over time and how this influences ecological, hydrological and geomorphological processes is still elementary. Some soil properties are persistent, but others can change rapidly with significant effects on water quantity and quality. This is particularly true at the hillslope scale, where lateral and vertical transport processes interact over various timescales. Water and vegetation shape the surface and subsurface properties of hillslopes through weathering, soil development, and erosion. These processes, in turn, control water flow paths. The distribution of water also affects the vegetation, while vegetation in turn also affects the flow pathways for water. Although all of these processes affect each other, their numerous interactions have only recently become a research focus. The multidisciplinary HILLSlope Chronosequence And Process Evolution (HILLSCAPE) project focuses on the vertical and lateral redistribution of water and matter along hillslopes and how this redistribution affects and is affected by soil, vegetation and landscape development. The co-evolution of these processes is a novel and challenging research field. The overall research question of the project is: How does the hillslope feedback cycle evolve in the first 10,000 years and how is this related to the evolution of hillslope structure, including plant cover? HILLSCAPE will identify the dominant controls on hillslope functioning and their feedback processes at hillslopes on moraines of different ages and thus stages in their evolution. We will use a chronosequence of highly instrumented plots at two different locations with different parent material and follow an all-measurements-on-all-plots approach to ensure integration of the different datasets and insights. For each age class, we will investigate six plots, covering a gradient of vegetation complexity. We will determine the hillslope structure at each of these plots and study the hydrological and geomorphological processes during frequent and extreme rainfall events by conducting a series of artificial rainfall experiments. We will also quantify the relevant structural and functional traits and characteristics of the co-occurring plants to derive indices of structural and functional diversity. The combination of the four interdisciplinary PhD projects and the integrative modelling work of the post-doc allows us to understand how hillslope structure and functioning and their feedback processes change during hillslope evolution.