Kolby Jardine

Kolby Jardine
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | LBL · Climate Sciences Department

Marine and Atmospheric Science

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72
Publications
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Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Full-text available
Leaf-level gas exchange data support the mechanistic understanding of plant fluxes of carbon and water. These fluxes inform our understanding of ecosystem function, are an important constraint on parameterization of terrestrial biosphere models, are necessary to understand the response of plants to global environmental change, and are integral to e...
Article
Full-text available
Semivolatile oxygenated organic compounds (SV-OVOCs) are important atmospheric species, in particular for the production and chemistry of atmospheric particulate matter and related impacts on air quality and climate. In this study, SV-OVOCs were collected in the horizontal plane of the roughness layer over the tropical forest in the central Amazon...
Article
Tropical forests absorb large amounts of atmospheric CO2 through photosynthesis, but high surface temperatures suppress this absorption while promoting isoprene emissions. While mechanistic isoprene emission models predict a tight coupling to photosynthetic electron transport (ETR) as a function of temperature, direct field observations of these ph...
Article
Terrestrial ecosystem dynamics are strongly modified by stresses associated with climate change, impacting plant growth and development, mortality, and ecological succession. Here we highlight the potential role of plant cell wall esters to link changes in cell wall structure and function with biosphere–atmosphere fluxes of methanol, acetic acid, c...
Article
Full-text available
Plants emit high rates of methanol (meOH), generally assumed to derive from pectin demethylation, and this increases during abiotic stress. In contrast, less is known about the emission and source of acetic acid (AA). In this study, Populus trichocarpa (California poplar) leaves in different developmental stages were desiccated and quantified for t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Azteca ants are widely distributed in the neotropics and have been utilized as natural insect repellent for centuries. Azteca oils provide natural defense against herbivores in mutualistic interactions between ants and their host trees. While chemical characterization of oil secretions revealed a composition dominated by iridoids and ketones, the v...
Article
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Understanding how plant carbon metabolism responds to environmental variables such as light is central to understanding ecosystem carbon cycling and the production of food, biofuels, and biomaterials. Here, we couple a portable leaf photosynthesis system to an autosampler for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to enable field observations of net pho...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plants emit high rates of methanol (meOH), generally assumed to derive from pectin demethylation, and this increases during abiotic stress. In contrast, less is known about the emission and source of acetic acid (AA). In this study, Populus trichocarpa (California poplar) leaves in different developmental stages were desiccated and quantified for t...
Article
Full-text available
Transpiration in humid tropical forests modulates the global water cycle and is a key driver of climate regulation. Yet, our understanding of how tropical trees regulate sap flux in response to climate variability remain elusive. With a progressively warming climate, atmospheric evaporative demand (i.e., vapor pressure deficit, VPD) will be increas...
Article
Full-text available
The emissions, deposition, and chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are thought to be influenced by underlying landscape heterogeneity at intermediate horizontal scales of several hundred meters across different forest subtypes within a tropical forest. Quantitative observations and scientific understanding at these scales, however, remai...
Article
Full-text available
Current climate change scenarios indicate warmer temperatures and the potential for more extreme droughts in the tropics, such that a mechanistic understanding of the water cycle from individual trees to landscapes is needed to adequately predict future changes in forest structure and function. In this study, we contrasted physiological responses o...
Article
Full-text available
Isoprene (C5H8) is a hydrocarbon gas emitted by many tree species and has been shown to protect photosynthesis under abiotic stress. Under optimal conditions for photosynthesis, ~70%–90% of carbon used for isoprene biosynthesis is produced from recently assimilated atmospheric CO2. While the contribution of alternative carbon sources that increase...
Article
Full-text available
Volatile terpenoid resins represent a diverse group of plant defense chemicals involved in defense against herbivory, abiotic stress, and communication. However, their composition in tropical forests remains poorly characterized. As a part of tree identification, the ‘smell’ of damaged trunks is widely used, but is highly subjective. Here, we analy...
Article
Full-text available
How plants respond physiologically to leaf warming and low water availability may determine how they will perform under future climate change. In 2015–2016, an unprecedented drought occurred across Amazonia with record-breaking high temperatures and low soil moisture, offering a unique opportunity to evaluate the performances of Amazonian trees to...
Article
Full-text available
Warming surface temperatures and increasing frequency and duration of widespread droughts threaten the health of natural forests and agricultural crops. High temperatures (HT) and intense droughts can lead to the excessive plant water loss and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in extensive physical and oxidative damage to...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-derived latex is widely used in rubber production and plays important roles in ecological processes in the tropics. Although it is known that latex oxidation from the commercially important tree Hevea brasiliensis, results in latex browning, little is known about latex oxidation in highly diverse tropical ecosystems. Here we show that upon ph...
Article
Full-text available
C1 metabolism in plants is known to be involved in photorespiration, nitrogen and amino acid metabolism, as well as methylation and biosynthesis of metabolites and biopolymers. Although the flux of carbon through the C1 pathway is thought to be large, its intermediates are difficult to measure and relatively little is known about this potentially u...
Article
Metadata describe the ancillary information needed for data preservation and independent interpretation, comparison across heterogeneous datasets, and quality assessment and quality control (QA/QC). Environmental observations are vastly diverse in type and structure, can be taken across a wide range of spatiotemporal scales in a variety of measurem...
Poster
Full-text available
Overview of Research Activities at the K34 Site in Manaus, Brazil: Long-Term Datasets and New Data Collection Initiatives. These long records of data are invaluable to address questions about long-term effects of climate change, inter-annual variability of vegetation productivity, and validation of long running remote sensing time series, to name a...
Article
Tropical forests absorb large amounts of atmospheric CO2 through photosynthesis but elevated temperatures suppress this absorption and promote monoterpene emissions. Using 13CO2 labeling, here we show that monoterpene emissions from tropical leaves derive from recent photosynthesis and demonstrate distinct temperature optima for five groups (Groups...
Chapter
Plants produce and emit a large array of volatile metabolites termed biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) as an integral part of primary and secondary metabolism. Although well studied for their impacts on atmospheric processes, there is much to learn about their biological functions. It is now recognised that many cellular processes leave u...
Article
Full-text available
The Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment took place around the urban region of Manaus in central Amazonia across two years. The urban pollution plume was used to study the susceptibility of gases, aerosols, clouds, and rainfall to human activities in a tropical environment. Many aspects of air quality, wea...
Article
Full-text available
Oil palm plantations are rapidly expanding in the tropics because of insatiable global demand for fruit oil to be used in food, biofuels and cosmetics. Here we show that three tissue-specific volatiles can be quantified in ambient air above an African-American hybrid oil palm plantation in Brazil and linked photosynthesis (isoprene), floral scent (...
Article
Full-text available
Isoprene (Is) emissions by plants represent a loss of carbon and energy resources leading to the initial hypothesis that fast growing pioneer species in secondary tropical forests allocate carbon primarily to growth at the expense of isoprenoid defenses. In this study, we quantified leaf isoprene and methanol emissions from the abundant pantropical...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical rainforests are an important source of isoprenoid and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions to the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of these compounds is however still poorly understood. In this study, vertical profiles of mixing ratios of isoprene, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes, were measured within and above the...
Article
Full-text available
Isoprene (Is) emissions by plants represent a loss of carbon and energy resources leading to the initial hypothesis that fast growing pioneer species in secondary tropical forests allocate carbon primarily to growth at the expense of isoprenoid defenses. In this study, we quantified leaf isoprene and methanol emissions from the abundant pantropical...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical rainforests are an important source of isoprenoid and other Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions to the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of these compounds is however still poorly understood. In this study, profiles were collected of the vertical profile of mixing ratios of isoprene, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes, with...
Article
Full-text available
Prolonged drought stress combined with high leaf temperatures can induce programmed leaf senescence involving lipid peroxidation, and the loss of net carbon assimilation during early stages of tree mortality. Periodic droughts are known to induce widespread tree mortality in the Amazon rainforest, but little is known about the role of lipid peroxid...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the known biochemical production of a range of aromatic compounds by plants and the presence of benzenoids in floral scents, the emissions of only a few benzenoid compounds have been reported from the biosphere to the atmosphere. Here, using evidence from measurements at aircraft, ecosystem, tree, branch and leaf scales, with complementary...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract. The Amazonian rainforest is a large tropical ecosystem, which is one of the last pristine continental terrains. This ecosystem is ideally located for the study of diel and seasonal behaviour of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the absence of local human interference. In this study, we report the first atmospheric BVOC measur...
Article
Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here, we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene...
Article
Full-text available
Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents an accurate analysis...
Article
Full-text available
The Amazonian rainforest is a large tropical ecosystem, and is one of the last pristine continental terrains. This ecosystem is ideally located for the study of diel and seasonal behaviour of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) in the absence of local human interference. In this study, we report the first atmospheric BVOC measurements at the...
Article
Full-text available
The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in Tg/annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently-fixed photosynthate; however, "alternate" carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical trees are known to be large emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), accounting for up to 75% of the global isoprene budget. Once in the atmosphere, these compounds influence multiple processes associated with air quality and climate. However, uncertainty in biogenic emissions is two-fold, (1) the environmental controls over...
Article
Full-text available
Acetylation of plant metabolites fundamentally changes their volatility, solubility, and activity as semiochemicals. Here, we present a new technique termed dynamic (13) C-pulse chasing to track the fate of C1-3 carbon atoms of pyruvate into the biosynthesis and emission of methyl acetate (MA) and CO2 . (13) C-labeling of MA and CO2 branch emission...
Article
Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions are widely modeled as inputs to atmospheric chemistry simulations. However, BVOC may interact with cellular structures and neighboring leaves in a complex manner during volatile diffusion from the sites of release to leaf boundary layer and during turbulent transport to the atmospheric boundary la...
Article
Full-text available
Isoprene emission from plants accounts for about one third of annual global volatile organic compound emissions. The largest source of isoprene for the global atmosphere is the Amazon Basin. This study aimed to identify and quantify the isoprene emission and photosynthesis at different levels of light intensity and leaf temperature, in three phenol...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods The responses of tropical forests to 21st century climate change are uncertain, and their potential feedbacks to global climate contribute to uncertainty in climate predictions. Forest responses will largely be governed by abiotically driven shifts in community assembly mediated by plant traits. Here, we focus on an im...
Article
Although several per cent of net carbon assimilation can be re-released as isoprene emissions to the atmosphere by many tropical plants, much uncertainty remains regarding its biological significance. In a previous study, we detected emissions of isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from tropical pla...
Article
Full-text available
Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived compounds emitted by all plants and are involved in a wide variety of developmental and stress-related biological functions. Recently, GLV emission bursts from leaves were reported following light-dark transitions and hypothesized to be related to the stress response while acetal...
Article
Full-text available
Isoprene is emitted from many terrestrial plants at high rates, accounting for an estimated 1/3 of annual global volatile organic compound emissions from all anthropogenic and biogenic sources combined. Through rapid photooxidation reactions in the atmosphere, isoprene is converted to a variety of oxidized hydrocarbons, providing higher order react...
Article
Full-text available
Organic acids, central to terrestrial carbon metabolism and atmospheric photochemistry, are ubiquitous in the troposphere in the gas, particle, and aqueous phases. As the dominant organic acids in the atmosphere, formic acid (FA, HCOOH) and acetic acid (AA, CH 3 COOH) con-trol precipitation acidity in remote regions and may repre-sent a critical li...
Article
Full-text available
Organic acids, central to terrestrial carbon metabolism and atmospheric photochemistry, are ubiquitous in the troposphere in the gas, particle, and aqueous phases. As the dominant organic acids in the atmosphere, formic acid (FA, HCOOH) and acetic acid (AA, CH3COOH) control precipitation acidity in remote regions and may represent a critical link b...
Article
Green Leaf Volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted by all plants. These GLVs are involved in a wide variety of stress-related biological functions, as well as the formation of secondary organic aerosols and ozone in the troposphere. To date, GLV emissions have primarily been associated wi...
Article
Full-text available
Through rapid reactions with ozone, which can initiate the formation of secondary organic aerosols, the emission of sesquiterpenes from vegetation in Amazonia may have significant impacts on tropospheric chemistry and climate. Little is known, however, about sesquiterpene emissions, transport, and chemistry within plant canopies owing to analytical...
Article
This comprehensive paper Misztal et al. is very exciting as it reports the first ecosystem-scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds from Oil Palm, a plant that is increasingly used as a global source of biofuel. This is an im-portant step in addressing the environmental impacts of biofuel plantations. I strongly recommend this...
Article
Full-text available
The emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from plants impacts both climate and air quality by fueling atmospheric chemistry and by contributing to aerosol particles. While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitat...
Article
Full-text available
Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantificati...
Article
Full-text available
Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantificati...
Article
Full-text available
The biosphere is the major source and sink of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. Gas-phase chemical reactions initiate the removal of these compounds from the atmosphere, which ultimately proceeds via deposition at the surface or direct oxidation to carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide. We performed ecosystem-scale flux me...
Article
The emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from plants impacts both climate and air quality by fueling atmospheric chemistry and by contributing to aerosol particles. While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitat...
Article
Full-text available
Large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOC) enter the atmosphere. The annual production of VOC (600 -2000 TgC/a) likely exceeds that of methane and CO (~500 TgC/a each). Together these gases fuel tropospheric chemistry. Oxidation of VOC leads to the formation of aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009) via complex organic chemistry (e.g. Atkinson...
Article
Pyruvic acid, central to leaf carbon metabolism, is a precursor of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that impact air quality and climate. Although the pathways involved in the production of isoprenoids are well-known, those of several oxygenated VOCs remain uncertain. We present concentration and flux measurements of pyruvic acid and other VOC...
Article
The North American monsoon is experienced as a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June ( 80 mm) over large areas of the Sonoran desert in southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. While the sudden availability of water, high temperatures and solar insolation is known to stimulate the primary productivity of the Sonoran...