Klaus Dodds

Klaus Dodds
University of London · Royal Holloway, University of London

PhD

About

285
Publications
67,609
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Introduction
I am a geographer who works on polar geopolitics, ice, border politics, health geopolitics and popular geopolitics. My books include both co-written such as The Arctic: What Everyone Needs to Know (2019 OUP with Mark Nuttall), co-edited ‘Observing’ the Arctic: Asia in the Arctic Council and Beyond (2020 Edward Elgar with Chih Yuan Woon) and single-authored such as Border Wars: The Conflicts of Tomorrow (Ebury 2021). I have worked for the UK Parliament twice as a specialist adviser.
Additional affiliations
September 1994 - present
University of London
Position
  • Professor
September 1994 - present
Royal Holloway, University of London
Position
  • Professor of Geopolitics
Education
September 1990 - February 1994
University of Bristol
Field of study
  • Political Geography and Geopolitics

Publications

Publications (285)
Book
Ice humanities is a pioneering collection of essays that tackles the existential crisis posed by the planet's diminishing ice reserves. By the end of this century, we will likely be facing a world where sea ice no longer reliably forms in large areas of the Arctic Ocean, where glaciers have not just retreated but disappeared, where ice sheets colla...
Article
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In this commentary, using the UK as our example, we focus on what we describe as the borderlands of the SPI and use two case studies to sketch out where we think there are further opportunities for geographers and others interested in advocating and engaging. As authors we bring to the topic different professional backgrounds and experiences at the...
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Scientific cooperation is a well-supported narrative and theme, but in reality, presents many challenges and counter-productive difficulties. Moreover, data sharing specifically represents one of the more critical cooperation requirements, as part of the “scientific method [which] allows for verification of results and extending research from prior...
Chapter
‘The physical environment’ describes the Arctic as the polar opposite of the Antarctic continent as it is an ocean semi-enclosed by land. The rocks of the Arctic record key periods in Earth history. The Arctic environment has had an interesting path of evolution. Why is the Arctic cold today? The polar latitudes actually receive less solar energy t...
Book
The Arctic: A Very Short Introduction provides an account of the Arctic, its physical environment, and its people. The Arctic is demanding global attention as it warms, melts, and thaws in a manner that threatens not just its 4 million inhabitants, but the whole planet. The reduction of the Arctic to its changing environment would ignore the comple...
Chapter
‘Peoples of the Arctic’ focuses on the 4 million people that live north of the Arctic Circle, providing an important distinction between indigenous and settler residents, as over 1 million indigenous peoples live in the eight Arctic states. Archaeological evidence suggests that the first people in the Arctic arrived about 40,000 years ago as there...
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‘Exploration and exploitation’ reviews the history of Arctic exploration and exploitation, which owes a great deal to early European encounters with the 'New World'. This topic includes the earliest Viking settlement of Greenland to a succession of European explorers and expeditions that were designed to search for the Northwest Passage. The Hudson...
Chapter
‘Arctic futures’ discusses the future of the Arctic that starts in the Norwegian territory of Svalbard wherein the Global Seed Vault functions as an Arctic sanctuary for the genetic diversity of crops. The Svalbard archipelago is a hotspot of Arctic amplification as rapid warming has been keenly felt by the small community. However, the environment...
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‘The Arctic world’ begins with the definition of the Arctic, which is understood as the land, sea, and ice lying north of the Arctic Circle set at a latitude of approximately 66.5° N. The Arctic tree line is a robust indicator of Arctic-ness as everything to the north is a landscape characterized by shrubs, dwarf trees, and lichen. Arctic warming o...
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‘Arctic governance’ discusses how the Arctic, unlike many other parts of the world, has been spared military conflict, civil wars, and terrorism. Arctic governance involves an array of actors, legal regimes, institutional and social contexts, and strategic aspirations. In 1989, Finland approached the other seven Arctic states with a proposal for th...
Chapter
‘The Arctic carbon vault’ describes the large share of Earth's organic carbon sequestered in the frozen ground and within the shelf sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. The organic carbon stock of the permafrost is roughly equivalent to half of total global soil carbon. A cold Arctic with extensive permafrost is an effective long-term carbon sink as...
Chapter
‘Arctic ecosystems’ highlights the treeless landscapes that fringe the Arctic Ocean, in which the diversity of plants is low, nutrient supply is limited, and soil depth is constrained by permafrost. The aim is to capture some of the key characteristics of the Arctic biome in the past and present. How do ecosystems function in the northern high lati...
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The Antarctic region has been experiencing rapid change in recent decades due to human-induced factors. Most notably, climate heating is causing ice sheet melting, leading to sea level rise and disruption in global ocean heat circulation, with far-reaching consequences. At the same time, this region holds unique research potential that can help ad...
Preprint
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This is a table showing a spectrum of vaccine acceptance, from vaccine apathy to conspiracy. It is a work in progress to underpin methodological development of vaccine hesitancy understanding.
Article
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While the world continues to work toward an understanding and projections of climate change impacts, the Arctic increasingly becomes a critical component as a bellwether region. Scientific cooperation is a well-supported narrative and theme in general, but in reality, presents many challenges and counter-productive difficulties. Moreover, data shar...
Article
This position paper aims to frame and supplement other papers in this special issue on subterranean geopolitics. We trace the research genealogy that brings together the subterranean with the geopolitical before accounting for the state-of-play in the subfield of subterranean geopolitics. Six research themes and foci that can connect to and enrich...
Article
COVID-19 is highlighting and exposing how public health and geopolitics intersect across spaces, scales, and settings. Existing literature focuses on the geopolitical determinants of health such as the allocation of foreign health-related assistance in postcolonial spaces and the relationship between population health and the health impacts of expl...
Article
The geopolitics of pandemics and climate change intersect. Both are complex and urgent problems that demand collective action in the light of their global and trans-boundary scope. In this article we use a geopolitical framework to examine some of the tensions and contradictions in global governance and cooperation that are revealed by the pandemic...
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In the reporting about COVID-19 diplomacy, Antarctica has functioned as the exceptional — the only continent, thus far, not to record a single case of COVID-19, although cases were reported on Antarctic tourism vessels in the northern Antarctic Peninsula. For six decades, Antarctic governance has been an experiment in global democracy and diplomacy...
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The "golden age" of Scandinavian television has often been associated with Nordic Noir crime dramas, yet many of the acclaimed serials also engage with geopolitical themes such as migration, cross-border crime, military conflicts, and global terrorism. In this article, we examine the ways in which Nordic Noir contributes to discourses on such topic...
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The Arctic has warmed by around 2°C since 1850, approximately double the global average. Even if the Paris Agreement successfully limits global warming to a further 0.5°C, the Arctic is expected to warm by at least another 1°C. The United Kingdom’s (UK) weather is linked to conditions in the European Arctic. For example, high atmospheric pressure...
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This book presents a novel and systematic social theory of soil, and is representative of the rising interest in ‘the material’ in social sciences. Bringing together new modes of ‘critical description’ with speculative practices and methods of inquiry, it contributes to the exploration of current transformations in socioecologies, as well as in pol...
Article
This paper develops further interrogation into ‘icy geopolitics’ and what it might tell us about how we treat substances like ice as geopolitical matter. It brings together various literatures that speak to ice as a substance and substantial matter. Second, ice is represented and experienced in a multitude of ways, from oral cultures of indigenous...
Chapter
Ealing Studios’ Scott of the Antarctic (1948) was designed to inspire post-war British and Commonwealth audiences that imperial heroes still had something to offer. While critics were courteous, box office receipts for the film were modest. In North America the film performed poorly. More significantly, the film’s genesis coincided with a new Cold...
Article
This essay serves as an introduction to the special issue recognising the 60th anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty. It provides the geopolitical and scientific context informing the creation of the negotiations for a new treaty between October and December 1959. Thereafter, it identifies some of the challenges facing the contemporary Antarctic Trea...
Article
This essay serves as an introduction to the special issue recognising the 60th anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty. It provides the geopolitical and scientific context informing the creation of the negotiations for a new treaty between October-December 1959. Thereafter it identifies some of the challenges facing the contemporary Antarctic Treaty Sy...
Article
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The view from the south is, more than ever, dominated by ominous signs of change. Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are intrinsic to the Earth system, and their evolution is intertwined with and influences the course of the Anthropocene. In turn, changes in the Antarctic affect and presage humanity's future. Growing understanding is countering popu...
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Full-text available
The view from the south is, more than ever, dominated by ominous signs of change. Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are intrinsic to the Earth system, and their evolution is intertwined with and influences the course of the Anthropocene. In turn, changes in the Antarctic affect and presage humanity's future. Growing understanding is countering popu...
Chapter
The term ‘geopolitical architecture’ is used to describe the ways in which states and non-state organizations access, manage, and regulate the intersection of territories and flows, and in so doing establish borders between inside/outside, citizen/alien, and domestic/international. Historically, there has been a series of such geopolitical architec...
Book
From great power politics and speculation about resource scrambles, to everyday encounters and objects such as smart phones, geopolitics affects citizens, corporations, international bodies, social movements, and governments. Geopolitics is far more than simply the impact of geographical features such as rivers, mountains, and climate on political...
Article
The 2018 Agreement to Prevent Unregulated High Seas Fisheries in the Central Arctic Ocean (Agreement) is a notable intervention in living resources management. The Agreement seeks to anticipate future fisheries management and serves as a reminder as how international legal frameworks such as UNCLOS ‘regionalise’ seas and oceans. But thus far analys...
Chapter
Climate change and its effects on Arctic societies, wildlife, and environments has been a recurring theme of this book. And for good reason. In many parts of the Arctic, these effects are inescapable, and, given that Arctic temperatures are rising faster than anywhere else on...
Chapter
The Arctic has undergone profound human and natural change over millennia. When we record that the Arctic is home to some 4 million people, it is a mere fraction of a world population currently approaching 8 billion people. Apart from the Antarctic, the Arctic remains...
Chapter
Humans and non-humans make their homes in many Arctic places. Cultures, societies, and ecologies have formed in relation to northern surroundings over millennia, over centuries, or mere decades. Environmental biologists warn of a new generation of invasive species entering northern terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments,...
Chapter
Every week, stories about the Arctic, usually addressing the state of sea ice extent and thickness, diminishing glaciers, rapidly thawing permafrost, acidification of the Arctic Ocean, the resource potential of the region, the opening of new shipping routes, and possible geopolitical tensions, appear in the...
Chapter
It is common to point to the Arctic Circle (66°N) as indicative of the start of the Arctic and “true north.” If you land at Rovaniemi airport in Finnish Lapland, you are told you have arrived at the home of Santa Claus. The town lies...
Chapter
The Arctic, if defined by land and sea (and ice) lying north of the Arctic Circle, is home to 4 million people. The majority of residents are found in the Russian North, and overwhelmingly non-indigenous. Development policy and population movement in the 1930s onward in...
Chapter
While awareness of the effects of climate change on the Arctic is growing and provoking anxiety over ecosystem thresholds and tipping points, circumpolar places are also increasingly presented to global audiences as dynamic, emerging, global regions that are “open for business.” Depending on whom you...
Chapter
The term “global Arctic” has gained traction in recent years as a shorthand term for a region in transition. We have spoken at length about climate change and resource speculation and their cumulative effects are part of this accounting for change. Another aspect of all...
Book
As the threat of global climate change becomes a reality, many look to the Arctic Ocean to predict coming environmental phenomena. There, the consequences of Earth's warming trend are most immediately observable in the multi-year and perennial ice that has begun to melt, which threatens ice-dependent microorganisms and, eventually, will disrupt all...
Article
Recent scholarship in political geography and allied disciplines such as Anthropology and Architecture has used registers such as the elemental and volumetric to explore the calculative, material, technical, and atmospheric interventions in, on, through and beneath the earth’s surface. In this special issue, our contributors engage in a ‘subterrane...
Article
Following the UK defence secretary’s announcement in September 2018 that the Ministry of Defence is to devise a Defence Arctic Strategy, Duncan Depledge, Klaus Dodds and Caroline Kennedy-Pipe look back on how UK defence has engaged with the Arctic over the past two decades and draw attention to the shift in focus from climate change to hard securit...
Article
Following the UK defence secretary’s announcement in September 2018 that the Ministry of Defence is to devise a Defence Arctic Strategy, Duncan Depledge, Klaus Dodds and Caroline Kennedy-Pipe look back on how UK defence has engaged with the Arctic over the past two decades and draw attention to the shift in focus from climate change to hard securit...
Chapter
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Using the Second Cold War (ca. 1974–1987) as a primary focus, this chapter contends that the “Bond formula” is neither formulaic nor institutionally ritualized as the term implies. It becomes more atmospheric, elemental, and resourceful. Three factors enable this shift. First, the emergence of blockbuster films and new techniques of production and...
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This chapter contends that the 2007 Russian flag-planting incident in the North Pole has ushered in a form of triumphant geopolitics insofar as it enabled the renewing of the imaginative and material grip of the five Arctic coastal states (Russia, United States, Canada, Denmark and Norway, A5) on the maritime Arctic. Triumphant geopolitics, in our...
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Released in October 2012, on the 50 th anniversary of Dr No (1962) in Queen Elizabeth II's 60 th year as the British head of state, the Sam Mendes-directed production Skyfall was a critical and commercial success. It was positioned as the third element of a trilogy of films involving Daniel Craig as Bond and garnered positive reviews from critics a...
Chapter
Skyfall (2012) is unusual, in a strictly geographical sense, because much of the action takes place in the United Kingdom. While London-based MI6 has borne the brunt of attack and mayhem before, Skyfall is far more introspective as Bond races to both save M and restore himself. Bond’s resurrection and resilience occupies centre stage in an analysis...
Article
This introduction highlights the four areas of inquiry addressed by contributors featured in this special issue of Journal of Popular Film and Television, “James Bond in the Daniel Craig Era”: agencies, moods, places, and structures. It also acknowledges the place of the Daniel Craig era in relation to other serial film franchises like the Jason Bo...
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In April 2013, Iceland launched a new international assembly for the Arctic, to be known as the ‘Arctic Circle’. This chapter traces the emergence of the Arctic Circle assembly, and introduces the idea that less institutionalised forums such as these serve an important function in the Arctic governance system as a ‘bazaar’ for the exchange of globa...
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This chapter addresses the ‘Asian city’ as elemental to the geographies of James Bond. It explores the differing depictions of Asian cities and urban landscapes noting two fundamental distinctions. First, a division is drawn between the developed and cosmopolitan cities of East Asia (like Tokyo, Hong Kong, and Shanghai) with the lesser developed ur...
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This chapter expands on the discussion of Bond’s bodily geopolitics by examining how his relationship with American agents is crucial to mission success. His long-standing relationship with CIA counter-part Felix Leiter is clearly significant, but so is his ability to master American sites and technology as well as women and, particularly, American...
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This chapter explores the shifting representations and embodied encounters with the Soviet Union/Russia. Given the Bond film’s initiation in the 1960s, the cartographies of the Cold War play an important role notwithstanding the transnational organization SPECTRE. Bond encounters Soviet agents, technology, objects, practices, and sites and spaces t...
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This chapter explores how James Bond is both conceptualized and depicted as an embodied agent. Bond’s body is complicit with geopolitics, as are the men and women he encounters. This chapter addresses how his body is a territory onto which his missions unfold and focuses on how his body is defined as being fit, sensual, technical, memorializing, an...
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This chapter explores the gender and geopolitics of mobility, and the messages conveyed about power, access, and management through Bond’s movement (or lack thereof) in a range of physical and social spaces. On the physical level, Bond operates in a variety of physical environments from the villain’s lair to national monuments to construction sites...
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This chapter explores the elemental in the Bond films focusing specifically on resource conflict. While the success of Bond’s missions often depends on his ability to negotiate and navigate the elemental, he also encounters these elements as an agent of Britain who works to safeguard their geopolitical interests. Through the figure of Bond, Britain...
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This chapter considers what we term ‘heartland geopolitics’. It reflects on the importance of London in the Brosnan- and Craig-era films in which the threat and safety of the nation are operationalized through the city’s infrastructure and inhabitants. While London has a fleeting presence in the early Bond films, it works to anchor Bond and the int...
Article
The introduction to Geographies, Genders, and Geopolitics of James Bond discusses the historical and geographical origins of cinema’s most famous spy, Commander James Bond 007. Written by former journalist and reserve naval officer, Ian Fleming, Bond’s origins lie with both the author’s experiences of World War II and his post-war life in Jamaica....
Book
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http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/handbook-on-the-politics-of-antarctica
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Article
‘As a Bond scholar and fan, this book opened my eyes to new ways of understanding the Bond films. Funnell and Dodds, both renowned scholars in their own fields, have combined disciplinary perspectives to provide an insightful and highly original analysis of the Bond franchise. This is a very welcome addition to the world of Bond scholarship that wi...
Article
The Antarctic provides vital ecosystem services and contains the world’s healthiest marine ecosystems, but faces increasing impacts from climate change and fishing. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), lauded as a leader in international fisheries management, is committed to adopting marine protected ar...
Article
This paper explores ‘awkward Antarctic nationalism’ and builds on the critical scholarship that explores the contours and contradictions of everyday, mundane, banal and even hot polar nationalisms. The emphasis on ‘awkward’ is designed to draw attention to the resonances and affordances that are associated with Australian polar nationalism in and b...
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This note addresses the recent announcement regarding Argentina's submission to the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. While the commission considered much of Argentina's submitted materials regarding the outer continental shelf (and sovereign rights that accrue to the seabed), it deliberately excluded areas of controversy includ...
Article
Geopolitics is a term encompassing a diversity of thought and practice that extends far beyond the academy. From its initial preoccupation with imperialist struggles closely linked to the survival of states and empires, geopolitics continues to attract attention in the policy realm with the unfolding of great power rivalries and global hegemonic ag...
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President Barrack Obama became, in September 2015, the first US president to travel north of the Arctic Circle. Having started his Alaskan itinerary in Anchorage, attending and speaking at a conference involving Secretary of State John Kerry and invited guests, the president travelled north to the small town of Kotzebue, a community of some 3000 pe...
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This article examines the significance of James Bond’s body and haptic encounters across situations, spaces, and contexts. It focuses on how his body is defined as fit, sensual, technical, memorializing, and calculating and on the ways that his body changes in accordance with shifting generic and gendered codes in the franchise.

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