Kjersti Lohne

Kjersti Lohne
University of Oslo · Department of Criminology and the Sociology of Law

Doctor of Philosophy

About

38
Publications
6,099
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164
Citations
Introduction
Kjersti Lohne currently works at the Department of Criminology and the Sociology of Law, University of Oslo. Her research interests lie at the intersections of war, crime and humanitarianism. While trained as a criminologist, she works across disciplines of criminology, international relations, international law and sociology of law. Her book 'Advocates of Humanity: Human Rights NGOs in International Criminal Justice' is coming out with Oxford University Press in November 2019. Other research projects include the US military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, where she conduced field research in 2016, technologizing the struggle against mass violence, and judicialization of Scandinavian civil society.
Additional affiliations
May 2015 - present
University of Oslo
Position
  • Researcher
April 2010 - December 2010
Peace Research Institute Oslo
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
While the criminal law and security governance aspects of the July 22 terror attack in Norway have been extensively analyzed in the academic literature, much less attention has been given to processes involving civil law, legal mobilization and legal-bureaucratic processes. The slow workings of the law mean that the aftermath of July 22 is still...
Article
This special issue sets out to explore the Theatrics of Transnational Criminal Justice. ‘Why’, we ask, ‘do transnational criminal justice actors perform themselves as they do?’ ‘Why are their representations frequently, if not different from, then often quite dramatized versions of the average reality of their practices?’ ‘What does such dramatizat...
Article
Full-text available
Mens de straffe- og sikkerhetsrettslige aspektene ved terrorangrepet 22. juli 2011 har vært grundig belyst i sakprosa og faglitteratur, har rettens mer generelle rolle i møte med 22. juli ikke blitt gjenstand for samme oppmerksomhet. Denne artikkelen skisserer en rettssosiologisk forskningsagenda ved å kartlegge de rettslige virkningene av 22. juli...
Article
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The article critically considers the role of NGOs at the US naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. On the basis of observation of pre-trial hearings for the case against Khalid Sheik Mohammed et al.—those allegedly responsible for the September 11 attacks—the article analyses NGOs as trial monitors of the US military commissions set up to deal with ‘a...
Article
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Solitary confinement in prison and police detention has been a widespread criminal policy and human rights problem in the Scandinavian countries for decades. However, in recent years, there has been a significant legal mobilization in Norway whereby lawyers individually and collectively have challenged solitary confinement in the courts. This use o...
Book
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This book comprehensively explores the role and manifestations of power in international criminal justice. Twenty chapters discuss this topic in four main parts: power in international criminal justice institutions (Part I), representational power in international criminal justice (Part II), state power and autonomy in international criminal justic...
Chapter
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This chapter proceeds to outline the potential of a sociology of international criminal justice. Following a seven-step approach, the next section identifies trends in international criminal justice that make a greater engagement with sociology critical. It then provides an inventory of the conceptual make-up of the sociology of law, before, fourth...
Chapter
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This chapter revisits one of sociology (of punishment’s) classics – Émile Durkheim – in a sociological interpretation of international criminal justice. It builds on data and analysis conducted as part of an ethnographic study of international criminal justice, with particular attention to the ICC’s intervention into the conflict in northern Uganda...
Article
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This reflective essay is inspired by a roundtable discussion at the World Science Forum on the question ‘Are there ethical limits to what science can achieve and should pursue?’ I argue that, amid the conflicting trends of ‘technological utopianism’—extreme faith in technological solutions; and ‘post-truth’ politics—the populist pushback against th...
Article
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With the consolidation of a cosmopolitan field of international criminal justice, penality has ‘gone global’. In spite of the abundance of doctrinal legal analysis, human rights studies, and transitional justice studies, there are few analytic attempts to engage with the working assumptions, cultural commitments, and dominant mentalities that give...
Article
Digital technological innovations make new types of responses to conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) possible, bringing with them both potential promises and pitfalls. Aiming to provide a conceptual starting point for further analysis, this article problematizes the trend towards data extraction in exchange for aid, protection and justice, and...
Chapter
The chapter draws on spatial sociologists to critically map out ‘where’ international criminal justice takes place, and how it is shaped by a multiplicity of scales, geographies, and sites. First, the chapter focuses on how international criminal justice is visibly and materially located, recognizing The Hague as a hub in the global networks of glo...
Chapter
The figure of the victim is the sine qua non of the fight against impunity for international crimes. Engaging the victimological imagination of international criminal justice, the chapter shows how victims are represented, and how justice for victims is imagined. The first part focuses on imaginations of ‘justice for victims’, and argues that the I...
Book
Advocates of Humanity offers an analysis of international criminal justice from the perspective of sociology of punishment by exploring the role of human rights organizations in their mobilization for global justice through the International Criminal Court. Based on multi-sited ethnography, primarily in The Hague and Uganda, the author approaches t...
Chapter
As apt for analysis that positions penality at the centre of social organization, the final analytic chapter cultivates a Durkheimian approach to global justice-making, and argues that international criminal justice reinforces a social imaginary of cosmopolitan solidarity embodied in the notion of humanity. Durkheim’s emphasis on how solidarity in...
Chapter
The final chapter situates some of the book’s major findings within contemporary resistance towards international criminal justice as global justice. It addresses how current pushback against international criminal justice is not only part of the story of the breaking of the universal and the move towards a multipolar, or a multiregional, system of...
Chapter
The chapter analyses the cosmopolitan penal imaginary building on western domestic penality, delving into the relationship between human rights sensibilities and criminal justice mentalities in the ‘fight against impunity’. Through the fieldwork in Uganda and Rwanda, the chapter describes asymmetries between the international and national criminal...
Chapter
A sociology of punishment for international criminal justice enables attention to the norms, morals, and values at play in the motivational dynamics of penal reforms. At the same time, these cultural forces must be analysed against the background of social organization and structure, indeed, as to what enables people to think and feel in certain wa...
Chapter
The chapter analyses how the NGOs organize in order to promote the ICC, and in doing so, engages networks as an empirical and conceptual feature of what makes the global. In doing so, the grounded and contextualized method of ethnography enables recognition of ‘friction’, of awkward disconnection and unevenness in the transnational networks of glob...
Chapter
The chapter introduces the research aims, conceptual framework, and methodology of the book. Departing from the story of the creation of the International Criminal Court (ICC) as a global civil society achievement, and previous research into how global and local civil society disagreed on their support for the ICC’s intervention into the conflict i...
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In a recent account of border control, Mary Bosworth introduces the notion of ‘penal humanitarianism’ to describe how humanitarianism enables penal power to move beyond the nation state. Based on a study of international criminal justice, this article applies and develops the notion of penal humanitarianism, and argues that that power to punish is...
Chapter
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The chapter approaches international criminal justice from a legal sociology perspective to shed light on the anxiety and hybridity in international criminal justice as 'being' criminal justice or victims' justice. Continuing the story of NGO influence upon then Rome Statute system of justice, the chapter provides an analysis of their organisationa...
Article
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Whilst sexual violence has been an offence associated both with war- and peacetime throughout history, its rise to the tables where international peace and security are negotiated, represents a significant shift. This article continues the scholarly conversation about conflict-related sexual violence and its emergence as a “hot topic” on academic,...
Article
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Over the past few years, the study of humanitarianism has emerged as an interdisciplinary subfield in international political sociology. This article maps out some preliminary ideas about the role of legal sociology in this project. The study of international humanitarian law has overwhelmingly been the terrain of doctrinal legal scholars, while th...
Chapter
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International criminal courts have in recent decades come to be seen as fundamental cornerstones in response to mass violence and grave human rights abuses. In the face of failed justice at the national level, the global and permanent International Criminal Court (ICC) has, since 2002, promised justice for victims of crimes against humanity, genoci...
Article
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The increased internationalization of law and the strengthened position of transnational civil society create a need for a criminological research agenda that investigates intersections between legitimacy and representation, punishment and welfare beyond the nation state. This article explores the need for and scope of such a research agenda, and p...
Article
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This article explores and attempts to define the emerging concept of the humanitarian drone by critically examining actual and anticipated transfers of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, from the global battlespace to the humanitarian emergency zone. Focusing on the relationship between the diffusion of new technology and institutional pow...
Article
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The growing impact of information and communication technologies has resulted in the establishment of data protection authorities across Europe. Despite the role of these bodies as enforcers of privacy and data protection legislation, Surveillance Studies has so far offered little attention to their role in resistance. Based on a critical socio-leg...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This Project is based on my Doctoral Research Project, carried out between 2011-2015. A book manuscript is currently under editorial review by the Clarendon Studies in Criminology at Oxford University Press, expected publication date in 2019.