Kiyoko Gotanda

Kiyoko Gotanda
Brock University · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

43
Publications
12,940
Reads
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1,707
Citations
Introduction
I am a former professional ballet dancer who is now a researcher in the fields of evolution, behaviour, and ecology. After dancing with ballet companies such as the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago and Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal, I hung up my pointe shoes and went to McGill University for my BSc. I received my PhD from McGill University, and I am a Postdoctoral Fellow at Sherbrooke University. My third passion after science and dance is photography.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - October 2017
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Fellow
October 2010 - February 2011
Macquarie University
Position
  • Visual modelling of male guppy colour
September 2009 - present
McGill University
Position
  • Adaptation as a Spatiotemporal Mosaic of Natural and Sexual Selection
Description
  • Using a combination of field and lab experiments, spatial and temporal variation in both natural and sexual selection are being explored using the Trindadian guppy as a model system.
Education
September 2009 - August 2015
McGill University
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Ecology
September 2005 - April 2009
McGill University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Humans have dramatic, diverse and far-reaching influences on the evolution of other organisms. Numerous examples of this human-induced contemporary evolution have been reported in a number of ‘contexts’, including hunting, harvesting, fishing, agriculture, medicine, climate change, pollution, eutrophication, urbanization, habitat fragmentation, bio...
Article
Temporal variation in selection is typically evaluated by estimating and comparing selection coefficients in natural populations. Meta-analyses of these coefficients have yielded important insights, but selection coefficients are limited in several respects, including low statistical power, imperfect fitness surrogates, and uncertainty regarding co...
Article
Full-text available
Local adaptation, adaptive population divergence and speciation are often expected to result from populations evolving in response to spatial variation in selection. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the major features that characterise the spatial patterns of selection, namely the extent of variation among populations in the strength a...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of phenotypic variation in nature often consider only a single potential selective agent. In such cases, it remains an open question as to whether variation attributed to that single measured agent might be influenced by some other unmeasured agent. Previous research has shown that phenotypic variation in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia ret...
Article
Full-text available
Flight initiation distance (FID), the distance at which an organism begins to flee an approaching threat, is an important component of antipredator behavior and a potential indicator of an animal’s perception of threat. In a field study on parrotfishes, we tested the predictions that FID in response to a diver will increase with body size, a correl...
Article
Urbanization transforms environments in ways that alter biological evolution. We examined whether urban environmental change drives parallel evolution by sampling 110,019 white clover plants from 6169 populations in 160 cities globally. Plants were assayed for a Mendelian antiherbivore defense that also affects tolerance to abiotic stressors. Urban...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is rapidly changing ecological niches. On the inhabited Galapagos Islands, Darwin's finches consume human-introduced foods preferentially; however, it remains unclear why. Here we presented pastry with flavour profiles typical of human foods (oily, salty, sweet) to small and medium ground finches to test if latent taste preferences mig...
Article
Full-text available
Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or they risk extinction. Such adaptations can be measured as phenotypic rates of change and can allow us to predict patterns of contemporary evolutionary change. About two decades ago, a dataset of phenotypic rates of change in wild populations was compiled. Since then, researchers h...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or they risk extinction. Such adaptations can be measured as phenotypic rates of change and can allow us to predict patterns of contemporary evolutionary change. About two decades ago, a dataset of phenotypic rates of change in wild populations was compiled. Since then, researchers h...
Article
Negative interactions between species can generate divergent selection that causes character displacement. However, other processes cause similar divergence. We use spatial and temporal replication of island populations of Anolis lizards to assess the importance of negative interactions in driving trait shifts. Previous work showed that the establi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The mechanisms underlying eco-evolutionary dynamics (the feedback between ecological and evolutionary processes) are often unknown. Here, we propose that classical theory from behavioral ecology can provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying eco-evolutionary dynamics, and thus improve predictions about the outcomes of these dynami...
Article
Humans exert dramatic influences upon the environment, creating novel selective pressures to which organisms must adapt. On the Galapagos, humans have established a permanent presence and have altered selective pressures through influences such as invasive predators and urbanization, affecting iconic species such as Darwin's finches. Here, I ask tw...
Article
Predator‐prey interactions play a key role in the evolution of species traits through antagonistic coevolutionary arms‐races. The evolution of beak morphology in the Darwin's finches in response to competition for seed resources is a classic example of evolution by natural selection. The seeds of Tribulus cistoides are an important food source for...
Preprint
1) Humans exert dramatic influences upon the environment, creating novel selective pressures to which organisms must adapt. On the Galapagos, humans have established a permanent presence and have altered selective pressures through influences such as invasive predators and urbanization, affecting iconic species such as Darwin’s finches. 2) Here, I...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are both a pressing environmental challenge and an opportunity to investigate fundamental ecological processes, such as the role of top predators in regulating biodiversity and food-web structure. In whole-ecosystem manipulations of small Caribbean islands on which brown anole lizards (Anolis sagrei) were the native top predato...
Article
The gut microbiota of animal hosts can be influenced by environmental factors, such as unnatural food items that are introduced by humans. Over the past 30 years, human presence has grown exponentially in the Galapagos Islands, which are home to endemic Darwin's finches. Consequently, humans have changed the environment and diet of Darwin's finches...
Article
Full-text available
The Trinidadian guppy is emblematic of parallel and convergent evolution, with repeated demonstrations that predation regime is a driver of adaptive trait evolution. A classic and foundational experiment in this system was conducted by John Endler 40 years ago, where male guppies placed into low‐predation environments in the laboratory evolved incr...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Trade-offs between natural and sexual selection have major consequences for the evolution of traits subject to both forces. However, such a trade-off might not be easily detected given that both natural and sexual selection operate in a multi-trait-rather than in a single-trait-manner. Organism: The Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulat...
Article
Full-text available
Although examples of successful applications of behavioral ecology research to policy and management exist, knowledge generated from such research is in many cases under-utilized by managers and policy makers. On their own, empirical studies and traditional reviews do not offer the robust syntheses that managers and policy makers require to make ev...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is influencing patterns of biological evolution in ways that are only beginning to be explored. One potential effect of urbanization is in modifying ecological resource distributions that underlie niche differences and that thus promote and maintain species diversification. Few studies have assessed such modifications, or their potenti...
Article
Full-text available
Background Darwin’s finches are a clade of 19 species of passerine birds native to the Galápagos Islands, whose biogeography, specialized beak morphologies, and dietary choices—ranging from seeds to blood—make them a classic example of adaptive radiation. While these iconic birds have been intensely studied, the composition of their gut microbiome...
Article
Over the past few decades, studies have demonstrated that the gut microbiota strongly influences the physiology, behavior, and fitness of its host. Such studies have been conducted primarily in humans and model organisms under controlled laboratory conditions. More recently, researchers have realized the importance of placing host-associated microb...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions are ubiquitous across biological systems. These interactions can be abstracted as patterns of connections among distinct units - such as genes, proteins, individual organisms, or species - which form a hierarchy of biological organisation. Connections in this hierarchy are arranged in a nested structure: gene and protein networks shape...
Article
Full-text available
The comment by Myers-Smith and Myers focuses on three main points: (i) the lack of a mechanistic explanation for climate-selection relationships, (ii) the appropriateness of the climate data used in our analysis, and (iii) our focus on estimating climate-selection relationships across (rather than within) taxonomic groups. We address these critique...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change will fundamentally alter many aspects of the natural world. To understand how species may adapt to this change, we must understand which aspects of the changing climate exert the most powerful selective forces. Siepielski et al. looked at studies of selection across species and regions and found that, across biomes, the strongest sou...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has the potential to affect the ecology and evolution of every species on Earth. Although the ecological consequences of climate change are increasingly well documented, the effects of climate on the key evolutionary process driving adaptation - natural selection - are largely unknown. We report that aspects of precipitation and pote...
Article
Full-text available
Humans challenge the phenotypic, genetic, and cultural makeup of species by affecting the fitness landscapes on which they evolve. Recent studies show that cities might play a major role in contemporary evolution by accelerating phenotypic changes in wildlife, including animals, plants, fungi, and other organisms. Many studies of ecoevolutionary ch...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have dramatic, diverse, and far-reaching influences on the evolution of other organisms. Numerous examples of this human-induced contemporary evolution have been reported in a number of “contexts”, including hunting, harvesting, fishing, agriculture, medicine, climate change, pollution, eutrophication, urbanization, habitat fragmentation, bi...
Article
Cope's rule, wherein a lineage increases in body size through time, was originally motivated by macro-evolutionary patterns observed in the fossil record. More recently, some authors have argued that evidence exists for generally positive selection on individual body size in contemporary populations, providing a micro-evolutionary mechanism for Cop...
Article
Galapagos Mockingbirds (Mimus parvulus) are opportunistic feeders that have been observed engaging in a variety of unusual predatory behaviors. Here, we report on a specific behavior that we observed: a Galapagos Mockingbird preying on an invasive mammal by repeatedly hitting it on the ground. We discuss the reasons that the mockingbird might have...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Our current understanding of general features of natural selection in the wild has focused on determining major patterns in the form and strength, as well as the temporal dynamics of selection. One of the remaining challenges is to understand the spatial dynamics of selection. Spatial variation in environmental feature...
Article
Full-text available
Dissolved oxygen (DO) can be a strong predictor of intraspecific variation in morphology and physiology in fishes. In the African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae Seegers, 1990, fish reared under low DO develop larger gills, deeper bodies, and larger, wider heads than full siblings reared under high DO, which could influence swim perf...
Article
This study tested the prediction that hypoxia may reduce the frequency of energetically expensive behaviours by quantifying male mating and aggressive displays in the cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae after long-term acclimation (5 months) to either high dissolved oxygen (DO) or low DO. Regardless of DO treatment, males engaged in more...

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