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kishor chandra Joshi

kishor chandra Joshi
CNRS|University of Paris Saclay|Centralesupelec · L2S

PhD

About

24
Publications
3,750
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370
Citations

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
The link misalignment and high susceptibility to blockages are the biggest hurdles in realizing 60-GHz-based wireless local area networks (WLANs). However, much of the previous studies investigating 60 GHz alignment and blockage issues do not provide an accurate quantitative evaluation from the perspective of WLANs. In this article, we present an i...
Preprint
In recent years, enormous growth has been witnessed in the computational and storage capabilities of mobile devices. However, much of this computational and storage capabilities are not always fully used. On the other hand, popularity of mobile edge computing which aims to replace the traditional centralized powerful cloud with multiple edge server...
Preprint
Full-text available
The link misalignment and high susceptibility to blockages are the biggest hurdles in realizing 60GHz based wireless local area networks (WLANs). However, much of the previous studies investigating 60GHz alignment and blockage issues do not provide an accurate quantitative evaluation from the perspective of WLANs. In this paper, we present an in-de...
Preprint
Ultra-low latency and high reliability communications are the two defining characteristics of Tactile Internet (TI). Nevertheless, some TI applications would also require high data-rate transfer of audio-visual information to complement the haptic data. Using Millimeter wave (mmWave) communications is an attractive choice for high datarate TI appli...
Preprint
IEEE 802.11ad specifies a hybrid medium access control (MAC) protocol consisting of contention as well as noncontention-based channel access mechanisms. Further, it also employs directional antennas to compensate for the high freespace path loss observed in 60GHz frequency band. Therefore, it significantly differs from other IEEE 802.11(b/g/n/ac) M...
Preprint
60GHz wireless local area networks (WLANs) standards (e.g., IEEE 802.11ad and IEEE 802.15.3c) employ hybrid MAC protocols consisting of contention based access using CSMA/CA as well as dedicated service periods using time division multiple access (TDMA). To provide the channel access in the contention part of the protocol, quasi omni (QO) antenna p...
Article
Ultra-low latency and high reliability communications are the two defining characteristics of Tactile Internet (TI). Nevertheless, some TI applications would also require high data-rate transfer of audio-visual information to complement the haptic data. Using Millimeter wave (mmWave) communications is an attractive choice for high datarate TI appli...
Article
The IEEE "Tactile Internet" (TI) Standards working group (WG), designated the numbering IEEE 1918.1, undertakes pioneering work on the development of standards for the TI. This paper describes the WG, its intentions, and its developing baseline standard and the associated reasoning behind that and touches on a further standard already initiated und...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the beamforming mechanism and protocols that enables fast link setup in 5G Millimeter (mm) Wave directional links. In general, there are two kinds of beamforming: adaptive beamforming and switched beamforming. There are three kinds of beamforming architectures, namely, analog beamforming, digital beamforming, and the hybrid...
Article
Due to a tremendous increase in mobile traffic, mobile operators have started to restructure their networks to offload their traffic in the unlicensed bands. The 3GPP new technologies of LAA and LTE-U employ an unlicensed radio interface that operates over the 5 GHz unlicensed band to leverage the radio resources for operators' transmissions. 5G re...
Article
Full-text available
Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) communications and nonorthogonal multiple access (NOMA) are two important techniques to achieve high data rates in fifth-generation (5G) ultradense networks (UDNs). Due to interference that is intentionally added during the superpositioned transmissions with NOMA, an additional power budget is required to maintain the targ...
Article
IEEE 802.11ad specifies a hybrid medium access control (MAC) protocol consisting of contention as well as noncontention- based channel access mechanisms. Further, it also employs directional antennas to compensate for the high freespace path loss observed in 60GHz frequency band. Therefore, it significantly differs from other IEEE 802.11(b/g/n/ac)...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid proliferation of wireless communication devices and the emergence of a variety of new applications have triggered investigations into next-generation mobile broadband systems, i.e., 5G. Legacy 2G--4G systems covering large areas were envisioned to serve both indoor and outdoor environments. However, in the 5G-era, 80\% of overall traffic is e...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Millimeter wave (mmWave) communication is being seen as a disruptive technology for 5G era. In particular, 60 GHz frequency band has emerged as a promising candidate for multiGbps connectivity in indoor and hotspot areas. In terms of network architecture, cloud radio access network (CRAN) has emerged as the most promising architectural alternative...
Article
Full-text available
The 60GHz frequency band promises very high data rates -- in the order of Gb/s -- due to the availability of high bandwidth. However, high free-space path loss makes it necessary to employ beamforming capable directional antennas. When beamforming is used, the links are sensitive to misalignment in antenna directionality because of movement of devi...
Article
Full-text available
Communication at mmWave frequencies has been the focus in the recent years. In this paper, we discuss standardization efforts in 60 GHz short range communication and the progress therein. We compare the available standards in terms of network architecture, medium access control mechanisms, physical layer techniques and several other features. Compa...
Article
In-home networking is becoming a reality. New multimedia applications envisaged for indoor networks require data rate of up to several gigabits per second. In order to meet such a demand for high data rate unlicensed spectrum of 5GHz around 60GHz band is being considered for a potential choice. This pico cellular infrastructure also helps in reduci...
Conference Paper
60 GHz wireless local area networks (WLANs) standards (e.g., IEEE 802.11ad and IEEE 802.15.3c) employ hybrid MAC protocols consisting of contention based access using CSMA/CA as well as dedicated service periods using time division multiple access (TDMA). To provide the channel access in the contention part of the protocol, quasi omni (QO) antenna...
Article
A long reach fiber wireless network is proposed for 60-GHz wireless application and all-optical routing/multicasting with simplified structure. This scheme is based on remote up-conversion and can provide flexible reach $({>}{rm 100}~{rm km})$ together with a reconfigurable platform for dynamic bandwidth allocation at the physical layer. The experi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Even though 60 GHz frequency band has limited coverage, due to the availability of higher bandwidth worldwide (unlicensed, approximately 5 GHz between 57-62 GHz), it is one of the promising candidates for future broadband employing both Fiber and Wireless (Fi-Wi) technology. In this article we briefly explain an in-home radio over fiber (RoF) archi...

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Project (1)
Project
The current trend in miniaturization of ICT devices, as well as open application development is supporting smart system development solving various societal and technological problems. These systems need massive deployment of sensors and actuators. New domains such as, Industry 4.0 is also pushing this massive growth. The current technology and the Internet configurations do not support these new domains fully. It requires concerted efforts to guarantee highly reliable communications with ultra-low latency. Currently, numerous efforts within the wireless LANs and Internet as well as 5G communication areas are looking only at high datarate communication. However, in the near future the research efforts should focus on highly reliable and ultra-low latency networks. Industry requirements: Industry 4.0 or Factories of the Future are directed towards large scale deployment of automation and control for better production and environmental friendly factories. The resource usage and yield should be highly efficient and they should also be workforce friendly. Such futuristic systems should have remote monitoring and autonomous operation & control capabilities. Moreover, the bi-product of these future systems are better health, lesser mobility issues and high productivity of workforce. This calls for new communication paradigm at various layers in communication stack as well as applications. Enabling such capabilities in communications will provide skilled persons to work remotely and still be able to feel like they are working on the systems locally. For example, remote surgery, remote handling of systems in hazardous zones such as reactors, remotely working on machine floors. Putting efforts on this topic will drive EU research & development community through one more cycle of innovation. Hitherto, network induced applications have fueled the innovation in the form of IoT/CPS. Now, to match the demand the wireless networks (in general communication networks) should also provide support for such futuristic applications. Academic challenges: The communication platforms and the Internet stack were designed to support more and more data with lesser delays. Until now the delay and largely the reliability was off-loaded to the applications and/or higher layers of network stack. However, the thinking now has to be changed to provide reliability at the lower layers itself. Bringing the roundtrip delay downwards to 1ms with reliability is an ardent task. This is the main challenge for academic & research community since the roundtrip delays of 1ms means a maximum distance of 150km. Further, the reliability in communication may not necessarily mean that all the packets are delivered, but the sum-total of message has been received by the operators (humans). Reliability of information transfer is different from reliability of packet transfer. This is another aspect that challenges the current thinking on communication and networks. Therefore, the solutions and adaptation needed to reach this stage is interesting and challenging for research & academic community.