Kirstin S. Brink

Kirstin S. Brink
University of Manitoba | UMN · Earth Sciences

MSc., PhD

About

46
Publications
9,811
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505
Citations
Citations since 2017
17 Research Items
375 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060

Publications

Publications (46)
Preprint
Tooth replacement is a conserved process in vertebrates extending back to the ancesters of modern fish, amphibians, reptiles and mammals. The patterns in dinosaurs and reptiles have been described by scientists as regular waves going from posterior to anterior of the jaws where every other tooth is replaced. The patterns suggest that local and poss...
Article
Despite the long history of research in the late Campanian Judith River Formation in northern Montana, most of the vertebrate fossils are represented by fragmentary remains, making precise taxonomic identifications difficult. Contrary to this, the partially contemporaneous Dinosaur Park Formation, Alberta, Canada is known for its tremendous fossil...
Article
Community zonation of the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway (WIS) has been suggested for bivalves, cephalopods, foraminifera, gastropods, and tetrapods. Most proposed WIS community zones consist of a northern and southern subprovince with a gradational boundary across central or south-central North America. Since it has been over three decade...
Article
Osteohistological data are commonly used to study the life history of extant and extinct tetrapods. While recent advances have permitted detailed reconstructions of growth patterns, physiology and other features using these data, they are most commonly used in assessments of ontogenetic stage and relative growth in extinct animals. These methods ha...
Article
Full-text available
Many reptiles are able to continuously replace their teeth through life, an ability attributed to the existence of epithelial stem cells. Tooth replacement occurs in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, suggesting the involvement of diffusible factors, potentially over long distances. Here, we locally disrupted tooth replacement in the leop...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Stratigraphic correlations of Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway (WIS) deposits of the Manitoba escarpment with coeval deposits across North America have proven historically challenging due to poor surface exposures and the repeating nature of calcareous and non-calcareous, massive mudstone units bound by unconformable contacts. Stratigraphic...
Article
Full-text available
Synopsis Reptiles with continuous tooth replacement, or polyphyodonty, replace their teeth in predictable, well-timed waves in alternating tooth positions around the mouth. This process is thought to occur irrespective of tooth wear or breakage. In this study, we aimed to determine if damage to teeth and premature tooth extraction affects tooth rep...
Conference Paper
Recent stratigraphic work on Late Cretaceous deposits of the Western Interior Seaway (WIS) from the Manitoba Escarpment include an updated lithostratigraphic framework, radiometric ages of bentonites, and foraminiferal zones, however data is currently lacking in terms of vertebrate biostratigraphy. An understanding of the distribution of vertebrate...
Article
Full-text available
The Early Permian Richards Spur locality is unique in preserving a highly diverse faunal assemblage in a cave system, composed of synapsids, reptiles, and anamniotes. However, the presence of Dimetrodon, the most common synapsid of Early Permian localities of the southwestern USA, has never been recorded from the site. Here, we describe for the fir...
Article
The mammalian dentition is uniquely characterized by a combination of precise occlusion, permanent adult teeth and a unique tooth attachment system. Unlike the ankylosed teeth in most reptiles, mammal teeth are supported by a ligamentous tissue that suspends each tooth in its socket, providing flexible and compliant tooth attachment that prolongs t...
Article
Full-text available
Tooth attachment and implantation are two classical descriptors of dental anatomy. Tooth attachment distinguishes between teeth that are either fused to the jaw by bone, or suspended within a socket by a periodontal ligament. Tooth implantation describes the geometry of this attachment and has been broadly divided into acrodonty, pleurodonty, and t...
Article
Full-text available
Body size is one of the most important characteristics of an organism, impacting a great variety of ecological characteristics. The influence of diet on body size has received considerable attention, with previous studies suggesting a greater tendency towards increased body size in herbivores than macro-carnivores. The earliest known herbivorous an...
Article
Full-text available
Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contri...
Article
Synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy with two-dimensional element mapping, micro X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate the chemical and structural nature of the enamel of a tooth from Troodon, a small theropod dinosaur. These methods show tha...
Article
Full-text available
The cover image, by Aaron Leblanc et al., is based on the Original Article Mineralized periodontia in extinct relatives of mammals shed light on the evolutionary history of mineral homeostasis in periodontal tissue maintenance, DOI: 10.1111/jcpe.12508.
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Dental ankylosis is a rare pathological condition in mammals, however, it is prevalent in their extinct relatives, the stem mammals. This study seeks to compare the mineralized state of the periodontal attachment apparatus between stem and crown mammals and discuss its implications for the evolution of non-mineralized periodontal attachment i...
Data
Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contri...
Data
Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contri...
Data
Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contri...
Data
Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contri...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this application, under Article 23.9.3 of the Code, is to conserve the widely used generic name Dimetrodon Cope, 1878 (SPHENACODONTOIDEA, SPHENACODONTIDAE). The name Dimetrodon is threatened by its senior subjective synonym Bathygnathus Leidy, 1853. The name Dimetrodon has become widely accepted and is in prevailing usage. It is prop...
Article
Full-text available
The holotype and only known specimen of Bathygnathus borealis is a partial snout with maxillary dentition of a presumed sphenacodontid from the Lower Permian (Artinskian 283–290 Ma) redbeds of Prince Edward Island, Canada. Due to its incomplete nature, assessment of the taxon’s systematic position within a cladistic analysis had never been performe...
Article
Full-text available
Tooth morphology and development can provide valuable insights into the feeding behaviour and evolution of extinct organisms. The teeth of Theropoda, the only clade of predominantly predatory dinosaurs, are characterized by ziphodonty, the presence of serrations (denticles) on their cutting edges. Known today only in varanid lizards, ziphodonty is...
Article
Full-text available
Fossil teeth are primary tools in the study of vertebrate evolution, but standard imaging modalities have not been capable of providing high-quality images in dentin, the main component of teeth, owing to small refractive index differences in the fossilized dentin. Our first attempt to use third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy in fossil teeth...
Article
Tooth counts are commonly recorded in fossil diapsid reptiles and have been used for taxonomic and phylogenetic purposes under the assumption that differences in the number of teeth are largely explained by interspecific variation. Although phylogeny is almost certainly one of the greatest factors influencing tooth count, the relative role of intra...
Chapter
A bs t r ac t Hypacrosaurus stebingeri is known from one of the most complete ontogenetic series of dinosaurs, yet the adult skeletal material has never been fully described. Here, the first detailed description of all well-known H. stebingeri crania is presented, accompanied by the first multivariate statistical analysis for lambeosaurine crania t...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Recent histological studies have revealed a diversity of dental features in Permo-Carboniferous tetrapods. Here, we report on the occurrence of plicidentine (infolded dentine around the base of the tooth root) in Sphenacodontia, the first such documentation in Synapsida, the clade that includes mammals. Five taxa were examined histological...
Article
The ‘Kem Kem beds’ of Morocco have yielded abundant material of largebodied theropod dinosaurs, but remains of small theropod taxa are rare. Here, we describe two femora that provide additional information on the diversity of small-bodied theropods in the Gondwanan mid-Cretaceous. An almost complete femur (ROM 64666) represents a noasaurid theropod...
Article
Full-text available
Paleozoic sphenacodontid synapsids are the oldest known fully terrestrial apex predators. Dimetrodon and other sphenacodontids are the first terrestrial vertebrates to have strong heterodonty, massive skulls and well-developed labio-lingually compressed and recurved teeth with mesial and distal cutting edges (carinae). Here we reveal that the denti...
Article
Les assemblages faunistiques d’amniotes du groupe de Pictou (Île du Prince-Édouard, Canada) sont réévalués pour la première fois en 50 ans. Les fossiles collectés dans les formations au sein de ce groupe (Orby Head, Hillsborough River et Kildare Capes) indiquent la présence d’un parareptile, ce qui représente la première occurrence d’un amniote non...
Article
Full-text available
Glishades ericksoni was named on the basis of partial paired premaxillae collected from the Late Campanian Two Medicine Formation of Montana, and was described as a non-hadrosaurid hadrosauroid. This interpretation of G. ericksoni has significant implications for hadrosauroid diversity and distribution because it represents the first occurrence of...
Article
Full-text available
The palate and partial braincase of the holotype of Dimetrodon milleri (MCZ 1365) are preserved in three dimensions, but have yet to be described in detail. Here, we describe these structures for the first time for this species, and compare them with the better-known specimens of D. limbatus. Interesting characteristics of the morphology include th...
Article
Full-text available
: Tracks and trackways of the vertebrate ichnotaxon Ichniotherium sphaerodactylum and a trace of the invertebrate ichnotaxon Striatichnium bromackerense are described for the first time in association outside of Europe. The tracks are identified as I. sphaerodactylum based on their characteristic rounded digit ends, the ovoid sole-pad of the pedal...
Article
Full-text available
A well-preserved skull from a previously unknown growth stage for the lambeosaurine hadrosaurid Hypacrosaurus stebingeri from the Campanian of western North America is described. This skull is equivalent in size to the smallest known growth stages for Corythosaurus, Hypacrosaurus altispinus and Lambeosaurus, and allows for a direct comparison of th...
Conference Paper
Sphenacodontids are the most speciose and abundant non-mammalian synapsids recog- nized from the Early Permian of Texas, known from hundreds of specimens. However, the ontogeny of sphenacodontids remains poorly understood and morphologic variation as a result of growth may confound the delineation of discrete characters useful for taxonomic and phy...
Article
Full-text available
Cunninghamia R. Brown ex. Richard is a cupressaceous arborescent conifer known from the Early Cretaceous to the Recent. Twelve specimens of permineralized leaves of Cunninghamia were identified from Late Cretaceous (Campanian) sediments on Hornby Island, British Columbia. The fossils, preserved in calcareous concretions, were examined using the cel...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The main goal of this project is to understand how teeth have evolved to suit their specific functions, mainly in non-mammalian amniotes. This is done at the tissue level using thin section data to show specific changes in tissue organization and tooth development that accompany major transitions in dental evolution. These include evolutionary shifts in tooth attachment, implantation, and the formation of complex dental batteries.