Kimberly Sheridan

Kimberly Sheridan
George Mason University | GMU · Division of Educational Psychology, Research Methods, and Education Policy

About

30
Publications
45,966
Reads
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2,320
Citations
Education
September 1998 - June 2006
Harvard University
Field of study
  • Human Development and Psychology

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Background In studio art, students are expected to be highly agentive—to engage in creative processes to form personalized representations of ideas, yet we lack knowledge on how teachers support their agency. Approaching agency as co-constructed practices across temporal dimensions, we examine how teachers shift between autonomy-supportive and dire...
Article
In this article, the authors describe over 20 years of work with Ellen Winner at Project Zero, a research and development group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This included a cross-arts curriculum and assessment project aimed at practitioners (ArtsPROPEL, 1989–1995), 10 meta-analytic syntheses of the effects of arts learning on nonart...
Chapter
Studio learning environments provide important support for young children as they learn to create and interpret in visual art and design. In this chapter, I use the Studio Thinking Framework, developed from research at Harvard University’s Project Zero that involved close observation of studio art classrooms to see what teachers intend to teach and...
Article
Full-text available
Research indicates that in experimental settings, young children of 3-7 years old are unlikely to devise a simple tool to solve a problem. This series of exploratory studies done in museums in the US and UK explores how environment and ownership of materials may improve children’s ability and inclination for (i) tool material selection and (ii) inn...
Article
Agency—broadly, the capacity to produce effects—is a critical aspect of human activity, yet its multifaceted character makes analysis difficult. Drawing from functional linguistics, we propose a linguistic toolkit for analyzing the degree to which and manner in which speakers represent themselves as acting intentionally and autonomously. After a br...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effect of time spent on homework and mathematics anxiety on mathematics achievement. Data from a nationally representative US sample consisting of 4,978 cases was used to predict mathematics achievement from time spent on homework and mathematics anxiety while controlling for demographic differences such as gender, grade...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent years, schools, museums, and other institutions have begun offering making experiences inspired by makerspaces that introduce children to making processes combining art, engineering, and new technologies (Honey & Kanter, 2013). Some experiences are focused on the creation of specific products with a step-by-step approach. Others focus mor...
Article
Despite multiple efforts and considerable funding, historically marginalized groups (e.g., racial minorities and women) continue not to enter or persist in the most lucrative of fields - technology. Understanding the potency of culturally responsive teaching (CRT), some technology-enrichment programs modified CRP principles to establish a culturall...
Article
Full-text available
In this essay, Erica Halverson and Kimberly Sheridan provide the context for research on the maker movement as they consider the emerging role of making in education. The authors describe the theoretical roots of the movement and draw connections to related research on formal and informal education. They present points of tension between making and...
Article
Through a comparative case study, Sheridan and colleagues explore how makerspaces may function as learning environments. Drawing on field observations, interviews, and analysis of artifacts, videos, and other documents, the authors describe features of three makerspaces and how participants learn and develop through complex design and making practi...
Chapter
In this chapter, we review research on how people learn disciplinary knowledge and practice in the arts. Learning in the arts is distinct from the other subjects discussed in this handbook (math, science, history, and literacy) for three core reasons. First, the arts are centrally a representational domain and learning in the arts involves becoming...
Poster
Introduction/Background: Scenario-based simulations have been described as beneficial because they provide learners with an intermediate step between learning a skill in isolation and performing it in clinical practice because scenarios represent some of the complexities and contexts of the actual clinical setting. How scenarios support this interm...
Article
Full-text available
Collaboration (GDMC), an informal education program in 3D computer modeling and 2D interactive game design serving primarily African American youth aged 7 to 19 years in the Washington, D.C. metro area, transformed from a program designed and taught by adults to one designed and taught by youth. In Year 1, 8% of youth participants held a leadership...
Article
Collaboration (GDMC), an informal education program in 3D computer modeling and 2D interactive game design serving primarily African American youth aged 7 to 19 years in the Washington, D.C. metro area, transformed from a program designed and taught by adults to one designed and taught by youth. In Year 1, 8% of youth participants held a leadership...
Article
However seductive and current, evolutionary accounts of aesthetics provide little explanation for the particularities of the histories of any of the art forms. Nor do accounts based on biological predilections explain how individuals grow to understand and enjoy art across cultural context. We argue that meaningful accounts of arts learning and dev...
Article
Full-text available
Exposing American K–12 students to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content is a national initiative. Game Design Through Mentoring and Collaboration targets students from underserved communities and uses their interest in video games as a way to introduce science, technology, engineering, and math topics. This article describes a...
Article
The Studio Thinking Framework (STF) focuses on habits of mind taught through studio arts rather than disciplinary content or media-specific techniques. It is well suited to integrate studies of arts learning and teaching in a range of contexts, and it provides a framework for understanding how visual arts participation is dramatically changing with...
Article
Full-text available
The findings from an after-school program entitled Game De-sign through Mentoring and Collaboration (GDMC) funded by the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program. A total of 139 middle and high schools students in the Washing-ton, D.C. metropolitan area to learn the basics of professi...
Article
Full-text available
Children from under-resourced areas are less likely to attend schools with advanced level computer science courses than those in more affluent schools. Girls of color enter technology fields at a lower rate than White females. Perhaps responsively, there is a growing understanding of how to change the tide and level the technological playing field...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Drawing on our work with 200 students in a Saturday and summer game design program, we focus on how scientific inquiry emerges from students designing game components using 3-D modeling and animation. When students create game components as such a basketball shooting through a hoop, a series of dominoes collapsing, and the trajectory of an arrow sh...
Chapter
The visual arts provide important and unique learning opportunities for young children. In this chapter, I use the Studio Thinking Framework, developed from research at Harvard University's Project Zero that involved close observation of studio art classrooms to see what teachers intend to teach and how they teach it, to inform how we can think abo...
Article
Many people believe that art education is important, but few can say exactly why. In this book, are the results of the first in-depth research on the "habits of mind" that are instilled by studying art--habits the authors argue that could have positive impacts on student learning across the curriculum. "Studio Thinking" provides art teachers with a...
Article
For a long time, creativity was viewed within psychology as a single undifferentiated capacity. A new mathematical formulation, an arresting work of visual art, and an innovative business strategy were all seen as undergirded by a common creative capacity. More recently, scholars investigating creativity have focused on the variability among creati...
Article
In this chapter the authors seek to navigate a path between the relationships among the individual's innate abilities, learned competencies, and potential for success in a given domain. They propose an alternative approach for linking abilities to potential for expertise by identifying two qualitatively different kinds of human abilities that they...
Article
Full-text available
In P. Locher, C. Martindale, L. Dorfman, & D. Leontiev (Eds.), New Directions in Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts (189-205). Amityville, New York: Baywood Publishing Company, 2006.

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