Kimberley A. Clow

Kimberley A. Clow
Ontario Tech University | UOIT · Faculty of Social Science and Humanities

About

41
Publications
52,018
Reads
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679
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
493 Citations
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Introduction
Kimberley A. Clow currently works at the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Kimberley does research in Legal Psychology (Psychology and Law) and Social Psychology. Her current project involves identifying factors that reduce the stigma that wrongly convicted individuals experience.
Additional affiliations
July 2004 - present
Ontario Tech University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Wrongful convictions continue to occur, with over 350 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States, and a collection of over 2500 known cases of presumed factual innocence at the National Registry of Exonerations. Conversation with exonerees suggest that at least some innocent individuals have met other wrongfully convicted prisoners while...
Article
In a series of three studies, we investigated whether exposure to a brief video would influence attitudes toward wrongfully convicted individuals among undergraduate students (Studies 1 and 2) and community members (Study 3). In Study 1 (N = 216), we hypothesized that participants who watched a video about wrongful conviction (eyewitness misidentif...
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that formerly incarcerated individuals, and individuals belonging to racial minority groups, experience stigma and housing discrimination. The current study explored landlords’ attitudes and differential communications toward formerly incarcerated individuals – particularly wrongfully convicted individuals – of varying races. Usin...
Article
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Driven by overwhelming numerical dominance of women in the role of nurses, nursing profession over the last two centuries has been largely scripted with gendered characterizations. However, nuances that shape the language and wording choices that are evoked when describing the stereotypes targeting male nurses remain relatively unexplored. Our curr...
Article
Much of our knowledge about wrongful convictions is derived from known exonerations, which typically involve serious violent offences and lengthy sentences. These represent only a small proportion of offences prosecuted in Canada each year, and little is known about how often innocent defendants may be wrongfully convicted of less serious offences....
Article
Full-text available
Objective: When wrongfully convicted individuals are released from prison, at first glance, it is a triumph; however, anecdotal evidence from exonerees suggests that obtaining housing postrelease is often challenging. We empirically examined whether race (Study 1) or type of criminal offense (Study 2) influenced landlords' willingness to rent to e...
Article
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The greater number of parole conditions imposed upon a releasee increases their potentiality for a parole breach or revocation. We analyzed the files of Canadian federal releasees to learn how closely individuals’ intake assessments (e.g., risk, need, classification) and current assessments (scored later, yet, prior to release) predict the number o...
Article
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Guided by Weiner’s (1993, Am Psychol 48:957-964) attribution theory of social motivation, we examined perceptions of exonerees. Specifically, we examined whether biased police procedures impacted perceptions of responsibility, emotional reactions, and willingness to assist exonerees. Participants read a vignette involving an exoneration due to eith...
Chapter
Full-text available
Many exonerees report that having been wrongly convicted disadvantages them in the job market. Recognizing the stigma experienced by former prisoners, in the current research, I empirically examined whether potential employers also discriminate against wrongly convicted individuals. One thousand job inquiry emails were sent to the contact individua...
Article
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Many exonerees report stigmatizing experiences and difficulties securing gainful employment postincarceration. Although researchers have begun to investigate public perceptions of wrongful conviction, there remains a dearth of knowledge about public perceptions of exonerees. To provide insight into how the public perceives exonerees, face-to-face i...
Article
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Framed by role congruity and ambivalent sexism, the current study is designed to investigate perceptions of male and female nurses. Specifically, 167 Canadian undergraduates from Southern Ontario viewed a potential nursing recruitment advertisement (female nurse, male nurse, or masculinity emphasized male nurse), reported their perceptions of the n...
Article
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Social role theory proposed that the gendered division of labor leads to the development of gender stereotypes that are consistent with the social roles that men and women frequently occupy. According to ambivalent sexism, gender prejudices stem in part from an unequal distribution of power and status. These theories appear particularly relevant to...
Article
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Exonerees report experiencing stigma post-incarceration. This research examined whether particular exonerees are stigmatized more than others. Participants read an article about a fictional exoneree who falsely confessed, was misidentified by an eyewitness, or was implicated by a jailhouse snitch, and then reported their perceptions. Participants i...
Article
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Relatively little research has investigated public perceptions of wrongful conviction. Considering the growing number of exonerees and the amassing literature on wrongful conviction, what does the public think about this issue of failed justice? This article investigates how the issue of wrongful convictions has entered Canadian citizens’ conscious...
Article
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Previous researchers have found that individuals who are exposed to negative pretrial publicity (PTP) are more likely to judge a defendant guilty than individuals exposed to little or no negative PTP. We examined whether or not minority defendants (black, Aboriginal) are differentially disadvantaged by negative PTP in comparison with white defendan...
Article
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Differing presentations of masculinity exist that appear to differentially embody elements historically associated with masculine and feminine domains. Metrosexuality, for instance, has been associated with more feminine characteristics and lifestyle choices (Simpson, 1994a) while laddist masculinity was presumed to be more traditionally masculine...
Article
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PurposeAlthough it is easy to assume that individuals who have been wrongfully convicted are stigmatized, research has not systematically examined this issue. This research compares perceptions of individuals who have been wrongfully convicted to perceptions of offenders to investigate the stigma that wrongfully convicted persons report. Method Par...
Article
Full-text available
With over 280 post-conviction DNA exonerations through Innocence Projects in the United States alone and half a dozen Commissions of Inquiry into wrongful convictions in Canada, the public may be more aware of wrongful convictions than ever before. Recent research, however, has documented the paucity of resources available post-conviction for indiv...
Chapter
Full-text available
Stigma-by-association usually refers to the prejudice that can result from an individual interacting with a stigmatized person. This chapter extends the concept to include the stigma resulting from negative association with the Criminal Justice System. In particular, stigma related to incarceration--whether the individual is innocent (i.e., wrongly...
Article
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Despite legislation for gender equality in many nations, gender discrimination continues to be a problem. Psychological research from social role theory, the stereotype content model, and ambivalent sexism provide insights into the motivations behind gender inequality. This article reviews key research findings from these theoretical perspectives i...
Article
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Although research has addressed factors underlying wrongful conviction, relatively little research investigates how people who have been wrongly convicted are perceived by others. In particular, we examined the impact of an exonoree speaking about his experiences on attitudes and perceptions of wrongful conviction. To contribute to this understudie...
Chapter
Full-text available
The content of most stereotypes are not uniformly negative. African Americans are stereotyped as loud and aggressive, but also as musical and athletic. Asian Americans are stereotyped as being cold and aloof, but also as high in intelligence. People express more respect for men than women, but more liking for women than men. Thus, rather than unifo...
Article
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Despite the growing number of university and law school-based innocence projects in North America, the impact of participation in the case review process on students has been underexplored. The current study investigated the experiences of criminology students who participated in an innocence project practicum at a Canadian university. Overall, par...
Article
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Two studies explored conceptual-motor compatibility effects underlying attitudes toward gay men and lesbian women. In Study 1, we tested if attitudes toward gay men and lesbian women would influence whether or not participants chose to engage in, and how quickly they engaged in, approach or avoidance motor movements. Participants responded to homos...
Article
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A content analysis of eight different men’s lifestyle magazines sold in Canada between November 2004 and August 2006 was conducted to explore how masculinities are currently being portrayed in regards to the body, aesthetics and grooming, and fashion. Findings suggest that different men’s magazines represent different forms of masculinity but eleme...
Article
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The current study used a double primed semantic decision task to investigate the role of social group information in mental representations of familiar others. Extrapolating from social role theory, we predicted that social role information would facilitate responding to familiar targets regardless of the specific task at hand. The names of celebri...
Article
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Purpose: The aim of the current investigation was to compare and contrast societal perceptions and attitudes towards men in nursing as reported by male and female nursing and non-nursing university students. Methods: A comparative study design was employed to investigate societal attitudes and perceptions towards male nurses enrolled in school of n...
Article
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Although there is considerable research addressing the factors that underlie wrongful conviction, relatively little research investigates attitudes toward wrongful conviction. To contribute to this understudied area, we surveyed first-and third-year Canadian undergraduates in criminal justice and noncriminal-justice majors to determine their attitu...
Article
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This paper situates male perceptions of the body within Bourdieu's theories of human practice. Recent research (Bordo 1999; Featherstone 1991; Giddens 1991; Gill, Henwood, and McLean 2005) has suggested that perceptions of the body are important to men's sense of confidence and that men see the body as a vehicle for personal improvement. To build o...
Article
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Research suggests that maintaining good physical and mental health helps prevent some women from being abused by their male partners, and that social support is inversely related to male-to-female vic- timization. This study examined the role of mental and physical health and two forms of social sup- port (all of which we define as elements of resi...
Article
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The current study investigates the impact of a criminal justice education on student knowledge about wrongful conviction. Past research has found fallibility of hard evidence (e.g., eyewitness misidentification), police and lawyer behaviors (e.g., tunnel vision), and social group discrimination to be underlying causes of wrongful conviction. We dev...
Article
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This research attempted to extend the classic cognition study, Neely (1977), to the domain of social stereotypes. Neely demonstrated the existence of automatic and controlled processing in the same paradigm and the differing effects these processes have on accessing category information. The current research extended these findings by using social...
Article
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Prior findings suggest presence of psychopathic personality traits may be prevalent outside of the criminal sphere, such as in the business world. It is possible that particular work environments are attractive to individuals with higher psychopathic personality traits. To test this hypothesis, the current study investigated whether psychopathic pe...
Article
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This research examined the effects of Personal Need for Structure, Need for Closure, and Personal Fear of Invalidity on information processing during the development of stereotypes. In Study 1, participants read as many group member descriptions as they wanted before expressing group stereotypes. Participants higher in Personal Fear of Invalidity s...

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