Kimberlee Baldry

Kimberlee Baldry
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

PhD Marine Science

About

14
Publications
8,680
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Citations
Introduction
I am an ocean scientist who specialises in observing coastal and open oceans and the application of ocean data. Currently, I work on revealing hidden phytoplankton – tiny plants – in the Southern Ocean. Using observations from ships and biogeochemical Argo floats, I assess the accuracy of bio-optical data and build statistical distribution models. Previously I have worked with carbonate chemistry data in the coastal zone of Saudi Arabia and Australia. Twitter: @bgc_kim
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • The fellowship was awarded to complete the project "The improvement of Biogeochemical Argo chlorophyll-a concentration data for large-scale studies of Southern Ocean phytoplankton"
August 2018 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Tutorial Facilitator
Description
  • Facilitated 2x4 hour computer tutorials
March 2018 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • PhD Thesis: Subsurface Chlorophyll Maxima in the Southern Ocean
Education
March 2018 - March 2021
University of Tasmania
Field of study
  • Marine and Antarctic Studies
August 2016 - December 2017
February 2013 - December 2015
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Chemistry (Physical) and Mathematics (Applied and Statistical)

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
The Red Sea is characterized by its high seawater temperature and salinity, and the resilience of its coastal ecosystems to global warming is of growing interest. This high salinity and temperature might also render the Red Sea a favorable ecosystem for calcification and therefore resistant to ocean acidification. However, there is a lack of survey...
Article
Full-text available
We use observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) to assess the impact of ecosystem metabolic processes on coastal waters of the eastern Red Sea. A simple, single-end-member mixing model is used to account for the influence of mixing with offshore waters and evaporation–precipitation and to model ecosystem-driven per...
Article
Full-text available
Our review of the literature has revealed Southern Ocean subsurface chlorophyll-a maxima (SCMs) to be an annually recurrent feature throughout the basin. Most of these SCMs are different to the “typical” SCMs observed in the tropics, which are maintained by the nutrient-light co-limitation of phytoplankton growth. Rather, we have found that SCMs ar...
Poster
Full-text available
Eight cheat sheets for users of Biogeochemical Argo data. The sheets describe data distribution, quality control in the Global Data Acquisition Center and the six core Biogeochemical Argo variables (chlorophyll-a, optical backscatter, pH, Irradiance, oxygen and nitrate). The cheat sheets aim to guide users by displaying information on data processi...
Article
Full-text available
Mangroves are important coastal ecosystems of warm climatic regions that often grow in shallow saline or brackish waters of estuaries and river mouths which are affected by wide tidal intervals and receive abundant nutrient supply. However, mangroves also occur in areas of little tidal influence and devoid of riverine inputs, where they can develop...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical seagrass meadows are highly productive ecosystems that thrive in oligotrophic environments. The Red Sea is characterized by strong N–S latitudinal nutrient and temperature gradients, which constrain pelagic productivity. To date, the influence of these natural gradients have not been assessed in metabolic rates for local seagrass communiti...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical seagrass meadows are highly productive ecosystems that thrive in oligotrophic environments. The Red Sea is characterized by strong N-S latitudinal nutrient and temperature gradients, which constrain pelagic productivity. To date, the influence of these natural gradients have not been assessed in metabolic rates for local seagrass communiti...
Presentation
Full-text available
This presentation highlights 5 challenges that I have identified whilst beginning to use the Biogeochemical Argo float chlorophyll-a fluorescence dataset in the Southern Ocean. I provide some short tips for dealing with these challenges in an attempt to aid new and existing users. With this advice: 1. The study of vertical distributions of chlorop...
Preprint
Full-text available
We use observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) to assess the impact of ecosystem metabolic processes on coastal waters of the eastern Red Sea. A simple, single-end-member mixing model is used to account for the influence of mixing with offshore waters and evaporation/precipitation, and to model ecosystem-driven pe...
Poster
Full-text available
A short fact sheet that simply explains the background and objectives of my PhD project.
Thesis
Full-text available
The coastal ocean is a marginal region of the global ocean, but is home to metabolically intense ecosystems which increase the structural complexity of the benthos. These ecosystems have the ability to alter the carbon chemistry of surrounding waters through their metabolism, mainly through processes which directly release or consume carbon dioxide...
Article
Full-text available
Owing to a lack of resources, tools, and knowledge, the natural variability and distribution of Total Alkalinity (TA) has been poorly characterised in coastal waters globally, yet variability is known to be high in coastal regions due to the complex interactions of oceanographic, biotic, and terrestrially-influenced processes. This is a particularl...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster for KAUST 2017 Winter Enrichment Program
Poster
Full-text available
A fact sheet prepared for a class on marine ecosystems.

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
To produce biogeochemical Argo (BGC-Argo) resources to aid new users of the program. The resources communicate the state of the data and science currently produced by the pilot program.
Project
The proposed thesis aims to review and progress current knowledge on the formation of SCMs in the Southern Ocean using multi-platform approach; combining BGC-Argo with ship-based data. This aim will be achieved through the following objectives: 1) Review the current knowledge of SCMs in the Southern Ocean 2) To compile Southern Ocean ship-based phytoplankton data 3) To ascertain the accuracy of fluorometers for detecting SCMs in the Southern Ocean 4) To observe SCMs in the Southern Ocean using both ship-based and BGC-Argo data, and to present a synergistic view of subsurface phytoplankton biomass and chlorophyll-a. 5) To link ship-based observations of deep diatom-dominated communities to BGC Argo data to infer distribution and “join the dots” in their successional ecology.
Project
The main objective is to investigate the carbonate chemistry of the (eastern) red sea in benthic-pelagic, and coastal areas. Data will be collected via cruises covering benthic-pelagic waters, coral reefs, seagrasses and mangroves. An attempt will also be made to characterise the carbonate chemistry of waters surrounding hydrothermal vents and brine pools. A comparative analysis of the role of each habitat in perturbing the carbon cycle in the Red Sea will be presented and latitudinal trends explored. Additionally it is hoped that isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide and methane in these environments will yield some meaningful results. The results of this project might provide more insight into the role of Red Sea ecosystems in the global carbon cycle.