Kim B. Serota

Kim B. Serota
Oakland University · Department of Management and Marketing

PhD

About

21
Publications
16,769
Reads
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684
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - present
Oakland University
Position
  • Faculty
September 1976 - present
Ford, Volkswagen, AFI, KBSA
Position
  • Marketing Research Industry
September 1975 - August 1976
Arizona State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Lie frequency and motives were examined from the perspectives of senders and receivers. Participants (N = 294) were randomly assigned to either report on recent lies they told or on lies told to them by others. Based on truth-default theory, it was predicted that the frequency of reports of own lies told would be positively skewed, that most lies w...
Article
A survey was conducted (N = 632) to determine which of the Big Five personality traits tended to be related to each of the three traits specified in the superdiffuser model of diffusion and influence (connector, persuader, maven). The purpose of the study was to better understand the traits that form the core of the superdiffuser model of opinion l...
Article
Testing truth-default theory, individual-level variation in lie frequency was parsed from within-individual day-to-day variation (good/bad lie days) by examining 116,366 lies told by 632 participants over 91 days. As predicted and consistent with prior findings, the distribution was positively skewed. Most participants lied infrequently and most li...
Article
Truth-default Theory proposes that the frequency of lying is not normally distributed across the population and that most lies are told by a few prolific liars. A survey with a probability sample examined the frequency of lying among of adults in South Korea. Consistent with theoretical predictions and well-documented prior findings from the United...
Article
Full-text available
In the psychological research literature, deception is often discussed as a ubiquitous phenomenon. However, recent research has revealed that the mean of two lies per day is highly misleading due to a skewed distribution, with most people telling zero lies on any given day. We sought to explore how the presentation of statistics on lie frequency af...
Article
Full-text available
Truth-Default Theory (TDT) predicts that across countries and cultures, a few people tell most of the lies, while a majority of people lie less frequently than average. This prediction, referred to as “a few prolific liars,” is tested in Japan. The study further investigated the extent to which the Dark Triad personality traits predict the frequenc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Deceptive marketing is fundamentally different from everyday interpersonal deception. This chapter examines how planned communications and the profit motive drive advertising and marketing deception. It looks at deception’s emergence as a key issue for the marketing disciple, the role of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in shaping a legal definit...
Article
Full-text available
Consistent with the Park and Levine's (PL) probability model of deception detection accuracy, previous research has shown that as the proportion of honest messages increases, there is a corresponding linear increase in correct truth–lie discrimination. Three experiments (N = 120, 205, and 243, respectively) varied the truth–lie base rate in an inte...
Article
Full-text available
Sender demeanor is an individual difference in the believability of message senders that is conceptually independent of actual honesty. Recent research suggests that sender demeanor may be the most influential source of variation in deception detection judgments. Sender demeanor was varied in five experiments (N = 30, 113, 182, 30, and 35) to creat...
Article
Full-text available
It has been commonplace in the deception literature to assert the pervasive nature of deception in communication practices. Previous studies of lie prevalence find that lying is unusual compared to honest communication. Recent research, and reanalysis of previous studies reporting the frequency of lies, shows that most people are honest most of the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The accuracy of consumer detection of marketing deception is a much understudied phenomenon. In fact, more than 30 years ago it was deemed unworthy of study and subsequently has mostly been ignored. But in the social psychological literature of human lie detection there is a growing realization that measuring accuracy is key to identifying certain...
Article
Full-text available
Although it is commonly believed that lying is ubiquitous, recent findings show large, individual differences in lying, and that the proclivity to lie varies by age. This research surveyed 58 high school students, who were asked how often they had lied in the past 24 hr. It was predicted that high school students would report lying with greater fre...
Article
Full-text available
Sender demeanor is an individual difference in the believability of message senders that is conceptually independent of actual honesty. Recent research suggests that sender demeanor may be the most influential source of variation in deception detection judgments. Sender demeanor was varied in five experiments (N = 30, 113, 182, 30, and 35) to creat...
Article
Full-text available
The use of influential network members to facilitate the process of behavioral change has long been a goal of communication campaign designers, particularly in health settings. In a series of 3 studies, measures of 3 types of influential others (those who are highly connected, persuasive, and informed) who play an important role in the disseminatio...
Article
Full-text available
The new television series Lie to Me portrays a social scientist solving crimes through his ability to read nonverbal communication. Promotional materials claim the content is based on actual science. Participants (N = 108) watched an episode of Lie to Me, a different drama, or no program and then judged a series of honest and deceptive interviews....
Article
Full-text available
Brands represent the outcomes of marketing investment and are an important component of the market value of the firm. Managing a brand portfolio requires an understanding of the role or function of each brand; this critical analysis yields the brand architecture. Typically this involves supply side analysis of a company's owned brands. Using an app...
Article
Full-text available
This study addresses the frequency and the distribution of reported lying in the adult population. A national survey asked 1,000 U.S. adults to report the number of lies told in a 24-hour period. Sixty percent of subjects report telling no lies at all, and almost half of all lies are told by only 5% of subjects; thus, prevalence varies widely and m...
Article
Full-text available
Boster et al.'s (2006) dimensions of diffusion ability were used to determine if the argumentation of superdiffusers of health information (those who are well-connected, persuasive, and knowledgeable about healthy lifestyles) is different from those who are not. In Study 1, 164 undergraduates completed the measures of diffusion ability. They were t...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research in the association between network centrality and job satisfaction has not established a consistent relationship between the two. Considering a specific type of network and multiple measures of centrality may clarify this relationship. Thus, the current study examined the association between various types of centrality in workplac...
Article
Multidimensional scaling has been used in political campaigns because it offers several advantages over the use of unidimensional scaling procedures. Specifically, multidimensional scaling allows the researcher to simultaneously observe change and rates of change with the public's attitudes toward the candidates and issues in the election campaign....
Article
The processes by which political attitude changes occur have been examined extensively from a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives. In this study, the authors attempt to extend the traditional balance formulation to a continuously-scaled least squares paradigm in which change occurs as a function of accumulated information. A long...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
With co-researcher Tim Levine, I am building a database of studies that measure lie frequency (i.e., number of lies per a standard unit ... day, week, n-text messages, n-events, etc.). If you have data from a published study, or unpublished data, that you can share for inclusion in this prevalence meta-analysis, please contact me through ResearchGate or directly at serota@oakland.com. Please indicate how you want your data cited.
Project
The theory of self-organized criticality (SOC) cuts across the physical and social sciences providing a framework for understanding how many small and seemingly unrelated events are related to larger and more consequential events. Earthquakes, biological extinctions, collective animal behavior, stock market fluctuations, traffic jams, and the formation of neural networks are some of the phenomena that can be explained with SOC. Recent studies on the prevalence of lying suggest that the wide variations in the number of people who lie, the number of lies told, and the quality (effectiveness) of lies told are socially organized and may contribute to a shift from equilibrium in human interaction to chaos and social dysfunction.