Kevin Nute

Kevin Nute
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa | UH Manoa · School of Architecture

BA Arch & Env Design BArch PhD

About

103
Publications
67,030
Reads
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91
Citations
Introduction
Kevin Nute's research focuses on transcultural aspects of Japanese architecture. His latest book, The Constructed Other, traces three recurring themes in Western accounts of Japanese architecture. It suggests that these narratives have had the effect of creating what amounts to a mythical version of Japanese architecture, often at odds with historical fact, but which has nonetheless exercised a powerful influence on the development of building design internationally.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
July 2019 - present
University of Oregon
Position
  • Professor Emeritus
January 2016 - February 2016
Chiba University
Position
  • Professor
Education
October 1990 - September 1994
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • PhD, Theory and History of Architecture
October 1983 - July 1985
University of Nottingham
Field of study
  • Bachelor of Architecture
October 1979 - July 1981
University of Nottingham
Field of study
  • BA Architecture and Environmental Design

Publications

Publications (103)
Article
Full-text available
The expression of time is widely believed today to be one of the unique features of traditional Japanese architecture. This article argues, however, that many of the apparently temporal features to have been identified in traditional Japanese buildings were actually accommodations of change rather than conscious expressions of time, and similar cha...
Article
Full-text available
The use of forms and/or ideas derived from other cultures has recently become a topic of popular debate and no small controversy. As a step towards helping to clarify precisely what does and does not constitute the misappropriation of culture, this study examines two characteristics that seem central to the issue: the “significance” of a form in it...
Book
Full-text available
The Constructed Other traces three recurring themes in Western accounts of Japanese architecture: a wish to see Western architectural theories reflected in Japanese buildings; efforts to integrate elements of Japanese architecture into Western buildings; and a desire to connect contemporary Japanese architecture with Japanese tradition. It suggests...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports the results of a series of experiments examining the potential psychological link between spatial and temporal prospects, specifically between variations in the degree of foreground obstruction and spatial depth of external window views and an observer’s sense of connection to the future. It was found that external views from i...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely believed that traditional Japanese buildings differed fundamentally from those of the West in actively responding to time. This article examines that notion by analyzing five arguments, based on language, history, and architectural elements respectively, that have been used to suggest that the traditional Japanese room was designed to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper uses the Zen-inspired medieval Japanese tearoom to examine the notion of buildings as artificial bodies. Through its gathering of unique objects in a specific place at a particular moment, the traditional Japanese tea ritual was intended to draw attention to the individual nature of all being, including our own. Through shared bodily con...
Article
The subjection of patients and medical staff to environmental stress is an important but neglected aspect of healthcare design. This article argues that, in addition to the inevitable stresses associated with being ill and having to wait for treatment, many existing healthcare spaces also inadvertently subject both patients and medical staff to two...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports the results of an experiment intended to test the effects of increasing the use of perspective visualizations in the early stages of building design. Compared to environments designed using plans and models, those generated using perspective views were found to have significantly greater variety in form, materials, light, and o...
Article
Taoist and Zen texts contain a number of commentaries on the nature of materiality. This research explores how those observations might be applied to the design of built forms. It argues that the characteristics of materiality are particularly relevant to built form because materiality and its absence, space, are its fundamental components. The art...
Article
Full-text available
While the Japanese pavilion at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, the Ho-o-den, has frequently been cited as a potential early influence on the young Frank Lloyd Wright, it is argued here that in the long term its primary significance for Wright's career as a whole may not have been directly architectural at all, but rather the elite...
Book
Full-text available
This Here Now shows how traditional Japanese buildings acknowledge unique materialities, objects and events, and argues that the built recognition of these singular phenomena serves to affirm the individuality of all being, including our own. The book also shows how buildings can help us to transcend our individuality, by enabling us to share the n...
Research
Full-text available
This exhibition, created in collaboration with Bundit Kanisthakhon and Kaylen Daquioag, uses the work of two modern American architects, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) and John B. Yeon (1910-1994), to illustrate how long-established ideas in one cultural context can serve as a source of innovation in another. The exhibit suggests that at least some...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The reuse of forms and ideas across cultures has recently become a topic of public debate. As a means of helping to define what, exactly, constitutes the misappropriation of culture, this research examines two conditions that seem central to potentially causing cultural harm: the significance of a form or idea in its original cultural context the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The goal of this research was to determine whether visual cues in indoor environments could evoke positive connections to the past and present, and what, if any, psychological benefits might flow from such links. Subjects preferred spaces with sloping ceilings, hearths, and refuge and prospect to spaces without these features, and this was positi...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last two decades the psychological benefits of mindfulness, a state of heightened awareness of the present centered on one’s own thoughts, have been widely reported. Typically this is achieved through deliberate meditation or during activities that require little or no direct attention. Such self-awareness is difficult to combine with task...
Article
Full-text available
Practical methods for bringing the natural movements of sunlight, wind and rain indoors, during the COVID 19 lockdowns, and beyond. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/arts/heres-how-you-can-bring-nature-indoors-when-youre-staying-home
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 crisis is likely to change building design again. Its health effects have not only been physical but also psychological. Our early ancestors evolved mostly outside in constantly changing natural environments. Yet the indoor spaces where we now spend much of our lives separate us from that world. One of the lessons of the current lockdo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Philosophers, psychologists and sociologists have long been interested in how we can overcome the inherently subjective nature of human existence to share experiences with others. A range of potential ways of transcending the limits of the individual human body have been proposed, from empathy to sexual relationships. Using examples drawn from tr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Over the last two decades the psychological benefits of mindfulness, a state of heightened awareness of the present centered on one's own thoughts, have been widely reported. Typically this is achieved through deliberate meditation or during activities that require little or no direct attention. Such self-awareness is difficult to combine with task...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The expression of time is today widely believed to be one of the unique features of traditional Japanese architecture. This paper argues that many of the apparently temporal features that have been identified in traditional Japanese buildings, however, were in fact accommodations of change rather than conscious expressions of time per se, and simil...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recognizing our physical characteristics forms part of our identity, and knowing where and when we are enables us to orient ourselves in the world. This paper argues that built environments can play a central role in helping us to meet these essential needs. It suggests that we can learn important lessons about how to architecturally affirm what, w...
Article
Full-text available
This research uses examples drawn from the work of two modern American architects, Frank Lloyd Wright and John B. Yeon, to show how established traditions in one context can serve as a source of innovation in another. It shows how both of these designers translated two-dimensional spatial devices derived from Far Eastern decorative and pictorial ar...
Article
Full-text available
This paper surveys foreign accounts of Japanese architecture published in English from the reopening of Japan in the 1850s up to the year 2000. It shows how European and American perceptions of Japanese buildings evolved from initial dismissal, through acknowledgments of merit, to positive admiration in less than fifty years. It is suggested that t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This conference presentation examines how indoor spaces could better connect their occupants to the present. It explains why this is psychologically and physiologically important, how extending the moment is central to the process, and how natural phenomenal movement could be a practical means of achieving it in the indoor environments where most p...
Article
Full-text available
Philosophers, psychologists and sociologists have long been interested in how we can overcome the inherently subjective nature of human existence to share experiences with others. A range of different ways of transcending the limits of the individual human body have been proposed, from empathy to sexual relationships. Using examples drawn from trad...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This conference presentation uses the examples of two modern American architects, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) and John B. Yeon (1910-1994), to show how long-established ideas in one context can serve as a source of innovation in another. It shows how these designers translated two-dimensional devices found in traditional Far Eastern art into mod...
Book
Full-text available
This video-augmented book explains how the natural movements of the sun, wind and rain can be used to improve the well-being of people in buildings and raise awareness of sustainable living practices. In demonstrating how buildings can be designed to reconcile their traditional role as shelter from the elements with the active inclusion of their mo...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the results of a preliminary investigation into whether indoor environments that evoke positive associations with the past, present, and future could be psychologically beneficial for building occupants. Subjects were asked to numerically evaluate a series of drawn images of rooms in which a range of visible temporal cues was ind...
Chapter
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Article
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At the close of the 19th century, when the United States was still largely looking to Europe for the lead on architectural styles, the young Frank Lloyd Wright was firmly of the belief that America should develop its own unique architecture, independently of the Old World. This research suggests that, ironically, a key inspiration in the developm...
Conference Paper
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Article
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Natural outdoor environments are known to reduce human stress, but most people in the developed world now spend more than 90 percent of their lives inside buildings, and the most common means of attempting to bring nature indoors - interior planting - is significantly less beneficial to human health than its outdoor equivalent. The work presented h...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Natural environments are known to be good for us, yet most people in the developed world spend the majority of their lives inside buildings, and the most common method of bringing nature indoors, interior planting, has been found to be significantly less beneficial than its outdoor equivalent. This paper explains how the movements of the weather mi...
Article
Full-text available
Modern architecture has dedicated much of its discourse to crystal-ball gazing - dwelling on the visionary and the speculative. Conversely, Kevin Nute, Professor of Architecture at the University of Oregon, puts the case for the present over the future and the past. To enhance experiences of the present, he describes how architects can harness the...
Book
Full-text available
This video-animated ebook explains how the natural movements of the sun, wind and rain can be used to improve the well-being of building occupants and raise awareness of sustainable living practices. In demonstrating how buildings can be designed to reconcile their traditional role as protection from the elements with the active inclusion of their...
Article
Full-text available
Many of the indoor spaces where most people now spend the majority of their time inadvertently deprive them of contact with two key requirements for their long-term well-being- nature and change. With the aim of improving the health and effectiveness of people in buildings at the same time as helping to sustain the natural environment, the research...
Article
Full-text available
This works examines the effectiveness of weather-generated change in indoor environments on occupant stress and attention. It was found that wind-animated light had a significant calming effect on heart rate, and was less distracting from a task than a similar artificial pattern.
Article
Full-text available
That Wright was an avid collector of Japanese prints has long been well known, but its role in his architecture remained elusive. This research shows how the breaking of the picture frame Wright saw in the prints of Hokusai and Hiroshige had a direct influence on Wright's destruction of the three-dimensioinal box and the blurring of built and natur...
Article
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The buildings of the self-trained Portland architect, landscape designer and conservationist John Yeon (1910-1994) are known for their close affinity with their natural surroundings. This relationship has been compared to that of traditional Japanese buildings and gardens, which have been sources of inspiration to western designers since the end of...
Article
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Conference Paper
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Book
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Article
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The Japanese tea room is analyzed as an instance of a consciously designed activity-dependent space. It is suggested that its identity as a place rests primarily on the unique presence of guests and utensils assembled for each gathering, and as such exhibits parallels with both scientific space-time and websites, which only "exist" when someone vis...
Article
Full-text available
Frank Lloyd Wright's admiration for traditional Japanese art has long hen well known. Yet, its precise role in his work has remained far from generally agreed. It is argued here that although Wright was by no means immune to the kind of romanticism that characterized much popular 19th century "Japanism," his particular interpretation of Japanese ar...
Conference Paper
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Article
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As the first authentic Japanese building Frank Lloyd Wright would have experienced firsthand, the Ho-o-den, or Phoenix Hall, built for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago has long been considered an important potential influence on the young architect. This research examines precisely how, focusing in particular on the cruciform plan o...
Article
Full-text available
The philosophical basis of Frank Lloyd Wright's concept of 'organic' architecture has generally been attributed primarily to the influence of his early employer Louis Sullivan. It is argued here, however, that there was in fact a fundamental difference between Sullivan and Wright in their conceptions of organic form. Evidence is presented that Wrig...
Chapter
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Article
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The Harvard trained American scholar Ernest Fenollosa originally went to Japan in the 1880s to help train the future leaders of Japan in Western philosophy. His own interest quickly turned to Japanese art, however, and he spent the remainder of his career first persuading the Japanese not to abandon their traditional art, then explaining its univer...
Article
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The American modernist Frank Lloyd Wright credited The Book of Tea, by Okakura Kakuzo, with introducing him to Lao Tzu's notion of void as the reality of a building. This paper examines Wright's work for signs of other ideas derived from Okakura's text on Sino-Japanese aesthetics, and those of the "teaism" in particular, which Okakura describes as...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The exchange of ideas between cultures has been a major source of advancement for human civilization. This research re-examines the essential characteristics of this process in the light of contemporary concerns over the dilution of cultural diversity.
Project
Developing and testing the psychological benefits of cues to positive recollections of the past, interactions with the present, and anticipations of the future in built environments.