Kevin J. Mullinix

Kevin J. Mullinix
University of Kansas | KU · Department of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
2,141
Reads
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1,028
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - present
University of Kansas
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2015 - May 2018
Appalachian State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2011 - August 2015
Northwestern University
Field of study
  • Political Science

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Survey experiments have become a central methodology across the social sciences. Researchers can combine experiments’ causal power with the generalizability of population-based samples. Yet, due to the expense of population-based samples, much research relies on convenience samples (e.g. students, online opt-in samples). The emergence of affordable...
Article
Party identification may shape interpretations of election integrity and vote counting. We use a nationally representative survey experiment to not only test this expectation but, more importantly, to assess the broader political conditions that accentuate or attenuate partisanship’s influence. Consistent with hypotheses, partisans’ views of electi...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Discourse about criminal justice in the USA increasingly revolves around wrongful convictions. Research has documented the emergence of the “innocence frame,” but relatively little is known about its effects on public opinion. We utilize framing theory to examine how various presentations of wrongful conviction information affect attitud...
Article
Full-text available
What impacts people’s willingness to restrict the civil liberties of suspected terrorists? For decades, social scientists have studied the dynamics that shape political tolerance, and increasingly, scholars examine the effects of terrorism for people’s willingness to limit civil liberties in pursuit of security. We argue that the social categorizat...
Article
The American public has affectively polarized such that partisans increasingly dislike the “other side,” and this may have deleterious consequences for a representative democracy. Yet, efforts to reduce partisan hostility arrive at mixed results. We propose a new approach that involves strategically priming civic norms with language tailored to a t...
Article
Full-text available
Controversial cases of police use of force against minority civilians have become a ubiquitous feature of news headlines, and videos of these interactions between citizens and government actors have placed them in the public sphere. In this paper, we examine the feedback effects of these publicized incidents. Using a unique survey-experiment implem...
Article
Wrongful convictions are an increasing salient feature of criminal justice discourse in the United States. Many states have adopted reforms to mitigate the likelihood of wrongful convictions, discover errors, and provide redress in the wake of exonerations, yet we know little about why some are seemingly more committed to reducing such errors than...
Article
Compulsory voting is known to increase turnout and produce a more representative electorate, but there is considerable debate about whether it stimulates political learning. Analyses of political knowledge using cross‐national and intranational observational data arrive at mixed conclusions. Experimental research is similarly inconclusive. We attem...
Article
The extent to which survey experiments conducted with nonrepresentative convenience samples are generalizable to target populations depends critically on the degree of treatment effect heterogeneity. Recent inquiries have found a strong correspondence between sample average treatment effects estimated in nationally representative experiments and in...
Article
Past research has found that citizens will support either side of a policy debate if their party endorses it, regardless of the policy details. Such results cast doubt on the electorate’s ability to direct and constrain public officials. Yet other studies find that people give priority to policy information in their decision-making. We hypothesize...
Article
A growing literature documents racial disparities throughout the American criminal justice system. Yet, even as this evidence accumulates and garners increasing media attention, we know relatively little about the consequences of this type of information for public opinion. We incorporate insights from attribution theory to suggest that people diff...
Article
Survey and laboratory experiments are increasingly common in political science. Investment in experimental data collection comes with costs and benefits, particularly for graduate students and advisers. This article describes a set of institutionalized procedures we have adopted with the goal of capitalizing on the advantages that come with experim...
Article
While a sense of civic duty has long been perceived as important for political participation, little is known about its implications for political preference formation. I argue that civic duty has salubrious effects for opinion formation by dampening partisan distortions in decision making. I theorize that a heightened sense of civic duty stimulate...
Article
Full-text available
An enduring and increasingly acute concern—in an age of polarized parties—is that people’s partisan attachments distort preference formation at the expense of relevant information. For example, research suggests that a Democrat may support a policy proposed by Democrats, but oppose the same policy if proposed by Republicans. However, a related body...
Article
Elite polarization has reshaped American politics and is an increasingly salient aspect of news coverage within the United States. As a consequence, a burgeoning body of research attempts to unravel the effects of elite polarization on the mass public. However, we know very little about how polarization is communicated to the public by news media....
Article
How does the public evaluate candidates in presidential debates? Previous literature often points to attitude reinforcement, but much of this research ignores heterogeneous effects between individuals. This article builds upon research on debate evaluations and motivated reasoning to isolate which individuals—beyond basic partisan differences—are a...
Article
This article focuses on four policies that a number of cities are using to make businesses more accountable for the development subsidies that they receive (cost–benefit analysis, effectiveness measurement, performance agreements, and clawback clauses). Using data from International City Management Association’s 2009 Economic Development Survey sup...
Article
The intersection of public policy and public opinion has fostered the development of an extensive body of scholarly literature. Much of the research strives to disentangle the relationship between policy and opinion. For this rich area of study to continue to flourish, it is imperative that innovations in public opinion are grasped and utilized. In...

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