Kevin L Monteith

Kevin L Monteith
University of Wyoming | UW · Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources, Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Physiology

PhD

About

103
Publications
43,247
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,641
Citations
Citations since 2016
69 Research Items
2302 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500

Publications

Publications (103)
Article
Capture and handling techniques for individual‐based, long‐term research that tracks the life history of animals by recapturing the same individuals for several years has vastly improved study inferences and our understanding of animal ecology. Yet there are corresponding risks to study animals associated with physical trauma or capture myopathy th...
Article
The temporal windows during which animals complete essential life processes (i.e. temporal niche) allow animals to match their actions to a given environmental context. When completing seasonal migrations, some migrants switch their activity patterns (e.g. from diurnal to nocturnal in multiple species of migratory birds) to take advantage of better...
Article
Chemical immobilization is an important tool for the capture, study, and management of wildlife. Increased regulation of traditional opioids has necessitated a search for alternative drugs in wildlife capture. Butorphanol–azaperone–medetomidine (BAM) is one promising alternative that has been used in a range of taxa, though often on medium‐size mam...
Article
Full-text available
Food quality and availability, when combined with energetic demands in seasonal environments, shape resource acquisition and allocation by animals and hold consequences for life‐history strategies. In long‐lived species with extensive maternal care, regulation of somatic reserves of energy and protein can occur in a risk‐sensitive manner, wherein r...
Article
Full-text available
Energy stores and migration are important adaptations for animals in seasonal environments, but their roles may vary relative to an animal’s endogenous and exogenous environment. In partially migratory populations, migrants and residents experience different seasonal environments, thus the influence of energy stores on survival may differ relative...
Article
Understanding factors that influence animal behavior is central to ecology. Basic principles of animal ecology imply that individuals should seek to maximize survival and reproduction, which means carefully weighing risk against reward. Decisions become increasingly complex and constrained, however, when risk is spatiotemporally variable. We advanc...
Preprint
Resource selection analysis (RSA) is a cornerstone approach for understanding animal distributions, yet there exists no rigorous quantification of sample sizes required to obtain reliable results. We provide closed-form mathematical expressions for both the number of animals and relocations per animal required for parameterising RSA to a given degr...
Article
Full-text available
Nutrition underpins survival and reproduction in animal populations; reliable nutritional biomarkers are therefore requisites to understanding environmental drivers of population dynamics. Biomarkers vary in scope of inference and sensitivity, making it important to know what and when to measure to properly quantify biological responses. We evaluat...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife capture, and the data collection associated with it, has led to major advancements in ecology that are integral to decision making pertaining to wildlife conservation. Capturing wildlife, however, can cause lethal and non‐lethal risks to animals. Understanding the factors that contribute to the level of risk involved in wildlife capture is...
Article
Full-text available
Secondary sexual traits (e.g., horns and antlers) have ecological and evolutionary importance and are of management interest for game species. Yet, how these traits respond to emerging threats like infectious disease remains underexplored. Infectious pneumonia threatens bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) populations across North America and we hypothe...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of ungulate migration is advancing rapidly due to innovations in modern animal tracking. Herein, we review and synthesize nearly seven decades of work on migration and other long-distance movements of wild ungulates. Although it has long been appreciated that ungulates migrate to enhance access to forage, recent contributions demo...
Article
Full-text available
As the climate warms, endotherms are challenged with maintaining body temperature within a neutral range. Modifying behaviour to mitigate heat loads is a potentially low-cost response to avoid heat stress and may be critical to persistence in a changing environment, especially for large endotherms. We tested the hypothesis that bed sites are a ther...
Article
1. Sample size sufficiency is a critical consideration for estimating Resource‐Selection Functions (RSFs) from GPS‐based animal telemetry. Cited thresholds for sufficiency include a number of captured animals M ≥ 30 and as many relocations per animal N as possible. These thresholds render many RSF‐based studies misleading if large sample sizes were...
Article
Full-text available
Members of the public play a primary role in successful implementation of wildlife management plans, making communication between scientists and the public a vital component of wildlife management. Although there is substantial public interest in the health of ungulate populations, stakeholder perspectives can vary widely, rendering a single approa...
Article
Full-text available
Maintaining functional connectivity is critical for the long‐term conservation of wildlife populations. Landscape genomics provides an opportunity to assess long‐term functional connectivity by relating environmental variables to spatial patterns of genomic variation resulting from generations of movement, dispersal and mating behaviors. Identifyin...
Article
Full-text available
Migration of ungulates (hooved mammals) is a fundamental ecological process that promotes abundant herds, whose effects cascade up and down terrestrial food webs. Migratory ungulates provide the prey base that maintains large carnivore and scavenger populations and underpins terrestrial biodiversity (fig. S1). When ungulates move in large aggregati...
Article
Full-text available
According to risk‐sensitive foraging theory, animals should make foraging decisions that balance nutritional costs and gains to promote fitness. Human disturbance is a form of perceived risk that can prompt avoidance of risky habitat over acquisition of food. Consequently, behavioral responses to perceived risk could induce nutritional costs. Popul...
Article
Patterns in disturbance severity and time since fire can drive landscape heterogeneity that is critical to conservation; however, there is limited understanding of how wildlife interact with the spatial–temporal complexities of disturbance outcomes and at what scales. We conducted multiscale modeling of habitat selection for male and female Rocky M...
Article
Adenovirus hemorrhagic disease affects primarily mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni), and moose (Alces alces) in their first year of life. The method by which the causative virus, Deer atadenovirus A, is maintained in the environment and transmitted to neonates...
Article
Full-text available
Movement is among the most important adaptations of animals living in seasonal environments. Movement allows animals to exploit spatially and temporally variable resources; these resources in turn influence individual fitness and demographic rates of populations (Fryxell et al. 1988, Bolger et al. 2008, Mueller and Fagan 2008, Hebblewhite and Merri...
Article
Full-text available
Birth timing is a key life‐history characteristic that influences fitness and population performance. For migratory animals, however, appropriately timing birth on one seasonal range may be constrained by events occurring during other parts of the migratory cycle. We investigated how the use of capital and income resources may facilitate flexibilit...
Article
Full-text available
In the Rocky Mountains, bighorn sheep restoration has been only marginally effective; this iconic wilderness species currently exists at a fraction of their historic abundance and often in fragmented and small populations. To inform bighorn sheep conservation and restoration efforts, it is critical to understand sources of variation in key vital ra...
Preprint
Sample size sufficiency is a critical consideration for conducting Resource-Selection Analyses (RSAs) from GPS-based animal telemetry. Cited thresholds for sufficiency include a number of captured animals M ≥ 30 and as many relocations per animal N as possible. These thresholds render many RSA-based studies misleading if large sample sizes were tru...
Article
Full-text available
Resource limitation at the population level is a function of forage quality and its abundance relative to its per capita availability, which in turn, determines nutritional condition of individuals. Effects of resource limitation on population dynamics in ungulates often occur through predictable and sequential changes in vital rates, which can ena...
Article
Full-text available
While the tendency to return to previously visited locations – termed ‘site fidelity’ – is common in animals, the cause of this behaviour is not well understood. One hypothesis is that site fidelity is shaped by an animal’s environment, such that animals living in landscapes with predictable resources have stronger site fidelity. Site fidelity may...
Article
Full-text available
Energy is fundamentally important to life and when energy supplies cannot support energy demands, animals may reduce energy deficits through behavioral compensation-a phenomenon that can vary with physiological state (state dependent) or environmental conditions (context dependent). We built an energetics model to estimate seasonal and annual energ...
Article
For ungulates and other long‐lived species, life‐history theory predicts that nutritional reserves are allocated to reproduction in a state‐dependent manner because survival is highly conserved. Further, as per‐capita food abundance and nutritional reserves decline (i.e., density‐dependence intensifies), reproduction and recruitment become increasi...
Article
Full-text available
Biologists often must use incomplete information to make recommendations concerning harvest of large mammals. Consequently, those recommendations must draw on a firm understanding of the ecology of the species in question, along with selection of the most applicable population characteristics on which to base harvest-both essential components for p...
Article
Full-text available
Reproduction is a costly endeavor, and most large, long-lived, and iteroparous mammals exhibit conservative life-history tactics wherein an individual may forego or abandon a reproduction event for the sake of survival. Nevertheless, risks and benefits associated with reproduction are not equal across males and females, nor across their life. Where...
Article
Full-text available
Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) can live in extremely harsh environments and subsist on submaintenance diets for much of the year. Under these conditions, energy stored as body fat serves as an essential reserve for supplementing dietary intake to meet metabolic demands of survival and reproduction. We developed equations to predict ingesta-free bo...
Article
Animals exhibit a diversity of movement tactics [1]. Tracking resources that change across space and time is predicted to be a fundamental driver of animal movement [2]. For example, some migratory ungulates (i.e., hooved mammals) closely track the progression of highly nutritious plant green-up, a phenomenon called “green-wave surfing” [3, 4, 5]....
Article
Full-text available
Information garnered from the capture and handling of free‐ranging animals helps advance understanding of wildlife ecology and can aid in decisions on wildlife management. Unfortunately, animals may experience increased levels of stress, injuries, and death resulting from captures (e.g., exertional myopathy, trauma). Partial sedation is a technique...
Article
Full-text available
To increase resource gain, many herbivores pace their migration with the flush of nutritious plant green‐up that progresses across the landscape (termed “green‐wave surfing”). Despite concerns about the effects of climate change on migratory species and the critical role of plant phenology in mediating the ability of ungulates to surf, little is kn...
Article
Wildlife diseases pose a substantial threat to the provisioning of ecosystem services. We use a novel modeling approach to study the potential loss of these services through the imminent introduction of chronic wasting disease (CWD) to elk populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). A specific concern is that concentrating elk at feedgr...
Article
Ecological theory and empirical studies have demonstrated population-level demographic benefits resulting from a diversity of migratory behaviors with important implications for ecology, conservation, and evolution of migratory organisms. Nevertheless, evaluation of migratory portfolios (i.e., the variation in migratory behaviors across space and t...
Article
Understanding nutritional condition of animals can provide insight into underlying drivers of population dynamics. To estimate nutritional condition, indices require capture or mortality of animals to obtain measurements of body fat. Advances in technology provide an opportunity to acquire estimates of nutritional condition in a noninvasive way if...
Article
For nearly 2 decades, the forests of the Rocky Mountains in the United States experienced a bark‐beetle (Dendoctronus ponderosae) epidemic. The number of dead and falling trees from this epidemic likely will affect how elk (Cervus canadensis) and hunters use the forest and their interactions. Downed trees potentially create a component of refuge ha...
Article
Agricultural producers lose millions of dollars annually to depredation caused by ungulates. Although multiple repellents exist, most are ineffective. Tannins are a plant‐defensive compound that have an astringent taste, reduce digestibility, reduce protein availability, and toxic to rumen microbes, resulting in the reduction of feeding by large he...
Article
Full-text available
From fine‐scale foraging to broad‐scale migration, animal movement is shaped by the distribution of resources. There is mounting evidence, however, that learning and memory also guide movement. Although migratory mammals commonly track resource waves, how resource tracking and memory guide long‐distance migration has not been reconciled. We examine...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of human harvest on evolution of secondary sexual characteristics has implications for sustainable management of wildlife populations. The phenotypic consequences of selectively removing males with large horns or antlers from ungulate populations have been a topic of heightened concern in recent years. Harvest can affect size of horn-...
Article
Full-text available
Human disturbance associated with energy development on winter ranges of migratory mule deer can prompt behaviors of perceived risk in areas near development. We evaluated how perceived risk affected the use of available food near development. Mule deer avoided disturbance at multiple scales, resulting in a loss of otherwise available food near dev...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term datasets are becoming increasingly important for assessing population-and species-level responses to a changing environment. Programs that record morphological measurements of horns, antlers, and pronghorns were established in the early-to mid-20th century to collect biological information about animals that possess large horns, antlers,...
Article
Whether attempting to escape harsh environmental conditions or securing access to mates, animals move in environments where resources are heterogeneous in time and space. Multiple factors shape the capacity for and execution of animal movement, including many physiological, behavioral, and neurological adaptations (Avgar et al. 2014). Animals that...
Article
Full-text available
Migration evolved as a behavior to enhance fitness through exploiting spatially and temporally variable resources and avoiding predation or other threats. Globally, landscape alterations have resulted in declines to migratory populations across taxa. Given the long time periods over which migrations evolved in native systems, it is unlikely that re...
Article
Full-text available
The availability and quality of forage on the landscape constitute the foodscape within which animals make behavioral decisions to acquire food. Novel changes to the foodscape, such as human disturbance, can alter behavioral decisions that favor avoidance of perceived risk over food acquisition. Although behavioral changes and population declines o...
Article
Forests of the Rocky Mountains (USA and Canada) have experienced a large‐scale bark‐beetle (Dendoctronus ponderosae) epidemic that has led to widespread mortality of pine trees, followed by structural and compositional changes to the forest. The millions of dead trees resulting from this event likely have an effect on ecosystem processes, but curre...
Article
1.The migratory movements of wild animals can promote abundance and support ecosystem functioning. For large herbivores, mounting evidence suggests that migratory behavior is an individually variable trait, where individuals can easily switch between migrant and resident tactics. The degree of migratory plasticity, including whether and where to mi...
Article
Long‐distance migration by terrestrial mammals is a phenomenon critical to the persistence of populations, but such migrations are declining globally because of over‐harvest, habitat loss, and movement barriers. Increasingly, there is a need to improve existing routes, mitigate route segments affected by anthropogenic disturbance, and in some insta...
Article
Learning where and when Large ungulate migrations occur across continents and inspire curiosity about how these animals know when to leave and where to go. Jesmer et al. took advantage of regional extinctions and reintroductions of several North American ungulate species to determine the role of learning in migrations (see the Perspective by Festa-...
Article
Full-text available
Survival in small populations (e.g., Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep or Sierra bighorn [Ovis canadensis sierrae]) is often highly variable. External selective pressures vary in the degree to which they regulate survival by sex and age class. Understanding the important factors and risks for different demographic classes helps managers design strategies...
Article
Full-text available
Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) are an iconic wildlife species of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) and grassland ecosystems in western North America. Over 50% of pronghorn have historically occurred in Wyoming; however, these populations have declined by nearly 30% in <2 decades, concurrent with expanding energy development and prolonged drought. Resea...
Poster
Full-text available
Finding conservation actions and recovery goals for endangered species that are biologically sound requires thorough knowledge of ecology and habitat requirements and how changes in habitat affect population growth. One of the most profound ways by which habitat influences ungulates is through nutritional pathways. Nutrition underpins growth, survi...
Article
Full-text available
Horns, antlers, and other horn-like structures are products of sexual selection, confer reproductive advantages, and are heritable and honest indicators of individual quality. In addition to serving key biological functions, horns and antlers garner societal interest that, when combined with the powerful motivation to acquire trophy animals, likely...
Article
Full-text available
Glucocorticoids (GC) and triiodothyronine (T3) are two endocrine markers commonly used to quantify resource limitation, yet the relationships between these markers and the energetic state of animals has been studied primarily in small-bodied species in captivity. Free-ranging animals, however, adjust energy intake in accordance with their energy re...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Wave Hypothesis posits that herbivore migration manifests in response to waves of spring green-up (i.e. green-wave surfing). Nonetheless, empirical support for the Green Wave Hypothesis is mixed, and a framework for understanding variation in surfing is lacking. In a population of migratory mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), 31% surfed plan...
Article
Full-text available
As the extent and intensity of energy development in North America increases, so do disturbances to wildlife and the habitats they rely upon. Impacts to mule deer are of particular concern because some of the largest gas fields in the USA overlap critical winter ranges. Short-term studies of two to three years have shown that mule deer and other un...
Article
Full-text available
Partial migration occurs across a variety of taxa and has important ecological and evolutionary consequences. Among ungulates, studies of partially migratory populations have allowed researchers to compare and contrast performance metrics of migrants versus residents and examine how environmental factors influence the relative abundance of each. Su...
Chapter
Studies in wildlife ecology often use descriptive and inferential methods that reflect characteristics of data and the practical needs of wildlife managers. The discipline generally emphasizes population rather than individual features or broader ecosystem processes; this approach is reflected in quantitative methods developed and adopted by wildli...
Article
Full-text available
Animals may partially overcome environmental constraints on fitness by behaviorally adjusting their exposure to costs and supplies of energy. Few studies, however, have linked spatiotemporal variation in the energy landscape to behaviorally mediated measures of performance that ostensibly influence individual fitness. We hypothesized that strength...
Article
Full-text available
The green wave hypothesis (GWH) states that migrating animals should track or ‘surf’ high-quality forage at the leading edge of spring green-up. To index such high-quality forage, recent work proposed the instantaneous rate of green-up (IRG), i.e. rate of change in the normalized difference vegetation index over time. Despite this important advance...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, populations of Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) in western Wyoming have declined. Recent work on the Jackson herd in northwest Wyoming suggests that the 1988 Yellowstone fires and regional drought contributed to a considerable decline in calf recruitment, which coincided with the recovery of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, populations of Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) in western Wyoming have declined. Recent work on the Jackson herd in northwest Wyoming suggests that the 1988 Yellowstone fires and regional drought contributed to a considerable decline in calf recruitment, which coincided with the recovery of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos...
Article
Full-text available
Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were re-introduced into the Black Hills, South Dakota, U.S.A. in 1965. To date limited information exists concerning vital rates of this population. From 2010 to 2013, we estimated survival and cause-specific mortality of 55 adult female bighorn sheep in three herds in the east-central Black Hills. We documented 21 m...
Article
Full-text available
Climate plays a fundamental role in limiting the range of a species, is a key factor in the dynamics of large herbivores, and is thought to be involved in declines of moose populations in recent decades. We examined effects of climate and growing-season phenology on recruitment (8–9 months old) of young Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) over three...
Article
Full-text available
The condition of maternal female mammals greatly influences life-history characteristics of their young, but interactions between habitat and maternal condition and their combined influences on birth characteristics and survival of neonates are less well understood, especially in free-ranging populations. We monitored survival of neonatal mule deer...
Article
Understanding the behavioral and physiological responses of animals to environmental stressors is vital to our comprehension of their ecology and life history. The life-history strategy of ungulates is for females to prioritize survival over reproductive effort to maximize life-long fitness (Stearns 1992, Eberhardt 2002, BÃ¥rdsen et al. 2008). Cons...