Kevin C. K. Ma

Kevin C. K. Ma
Memorial University of Newfoundland · Department of Ocean Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy
Echinoderm taxonomy, ecology, and fisheries.

About

37
Publications
6,689
Reads
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111
Citations
Citations since 2016
30 Research Items
100 Citations
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Introduction
Presently, I am interested in documenting range extensions of deep-sea echinoderms, optimising sea cucumber harvesting and processing in Atlantic Canada, and evaluating the feasibility of a sea cucumber fishery in Nunavut.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - August 2022
Rhodes University
Position
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Description
  • Biogeography and species interactions among rocky shore invertebrates.
Education
January 2013 - January 2020
Laval University
Field of study
  • Oceanography
September 2009 - December 2012
September 2003 - May 2008
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Field of study
  • Ecology and Environmental Biology

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between larval supply and settlement is an integral part of the demographic processes of benthic marine organisms that determine their distribution at subsequent life stages. In ascidians, a strong positive relationship between larval supply and settlement has been previously documented, but only at small spatial scales (one locati...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biogeographic boundaries can act as either weak or strong barriers to the spread of species undergoing distributional change. Once a novel species spreads across a boundary, it can have a substantial impact on the ecosystem, for instance by competing with local species, and, over the long-term, re-engineer the ecosystem. Marine biogeographic re...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract We hypothesized congruence in the spatial structure of abundance data sampled across multiple scales for an ecological guild of consumers that exploit similar nutritional and habitat resources. We tested this hypothesis on the spatial organization of abundance of an herbivorous guild of sea urchins. We also examined whether the amount of l...
Article
We compiled known occurrence records of seven species of crabs identified in the literature and one documented in this report as having undergone range extensions in southern Africa. Of these eight species, six (Austruca occidentalis, Neosarmatium africanum, Ocypode ceratophthalmus, Portunus segnis, Tubuca urvillei, and Varuna litterata) have exten...
Article
Full-text available
The choice of the duration and frequency of sampling to detect relevant patterns in field experiments or for environmental monitoring is always challenging since time and material resources are limited. In practice, duration and frequency of sampling are often chosen based on logistical constraints, experience, or practices described in published w...
Article
Semimytilus patagonicus is an invasive mussel on the coast of southern Africa and has extended its range in recent years. We asked whether its distribution and abundance are consistent with the abundant‐centre hypothesis (ACH). Marginal populations were located by monitoring 33 rocky shore sites in South Africa and southern Namibia in 2021. This re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over recent decades, polar waters have experienced an unprecedented amount of anthropogenic activity due to climate change melting sea-ice and creating new pathways through previously inaccessible waters. As anthropogenic activity increased in these regions, shipping has become more frequent and thus the movement of organisms through ballast water...
Data
This dataset contains data described in the paper entitled "Biogeographic drivers of distribution and abundance in an alien ecosystem engineer: Transboundary range expansion, barriers to spread, and spatial structure". Data include: (1) historical and contemporary records of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis to re-construct its invasion...
Article
Full-text available
The invasion history and current distribution of the alien marine mussel, the bisexual mussel Semimytilus algosus, on rocky shores of South Africa is described in this study. The eastern edge of its distribution has been monitored since 2014, and the most-recent observations were made between January and March of 2020, at 16 sites between Hondeklip...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the spread of invasive species in many regions is difficult because surveys are rare. Here, historical records of the invasive marine mussel, Semimytilus algosus, on the shores of Angola and Namibia are synthesised to re-construct its invasive history. Since this mussel was first discovered in Namibia about 90 years ago, it has spread...
Data
This dataset contains data described in the paper entitled 'Larval supply is a limited determinant of settlement at mesoscales across an anthropogenic seascape'. Data include larval abundance and recruitment densities of a non-native colonial ascidian, Botryllus schlosseri (Pallas, 1766), in a marina in Ben Eoin, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Thesis
Full-text available
As a consequence of anthropogenic activities, biological invasions have become a global problem that can cause ecological (e.g., biodiversity and habitat), economic (industries), and social (human wellbeing) harm. Prevention and early detection of new invasions are vital components of managing risks and impacts to ecosystems and economies. Preventi...
Article
Full-text available
Colonization of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) by tunicates can lead to reduced plant growth and survival. Several of the tunicate species that are found on eelgrass in the northwest Atlantic are highly aggressive colonizers, and range expansions are predicted in association with climate-change induced increases in seawater temperature. In 2017, we s...
Article
Full-text available
We report new observations of two invasive ascidian species, the solitary Ascidiella aspersa and the colonial Diplosoma listerianum, from Eastern Canada, which include some records from new sites. Because these species share many superficial characteristics with native and non-native species in the region, identifications based on detailed taxonomi...
Article
Full-text available
Five samples of Diplosoma listerianum, a non-indigenous colonial ascidian species complex, were collected via SCUBA between August 27 and September 28, 2017, from four sites in the coastal waters (depth ranging between 3.1 and 18.0 metres) around Brier Island, Nova Scotia, Canada. These samples constitute the second record of D. listerianum in Nova...
Article
Full-text available
Spread of a non-indigenous ascidian (NIA), Botryllus schlosseri (Tunicata: Ascidiacea), has been detected since 2006 in coastal waters of Newfoundland. This species has been of economic concern because NIA can be a costly nuisance for bivalve aquaculture. The presence of this temperate-adapted species in Newfoundland represents an extension of its...
Article
Full-text available
Managers and policymakers in eastern Canada embrace science-based management of nonindigenous species and may benefit from having comprehensive regional species checklists at subnational jurisdictional levels. In this paper, regional checklists provide an account of the richness of ascidians in eastern Canada. Records of 58 ascidians resulted from...
Data
Managers and policymakers in eastern Canada embrace science-based management of nonindigenous species and may benefit from having comprehensive regional species checklists at subnational jurisdictional levels. In this paper, regional checklists provide an account of the richness of ascidians in eastern Canada. Records of 58 ascidians resulted from...
Article
Full-text available
In eastern Canada, the initial suspected discovery of the non-indigenous colonial ascidian Diplosoma listerianum in Quebec was followed by species identification and increased awareness for its detection in the neighbouring provinces of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. A phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on sequences generated from the...
Poster
Full-text available
Titre de l'affiche : La diffusion des connaissances sur les risques et les stratégies de surveillance pour les espèces aquatiques envahissantes dans les ports canadiens de l'Arctique. Résumé de la présentation : Natural barriers to the establishment of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in Arctic Canada are rapidly being reduced by climate change and...
Poster
Full-text available
The use of settlement plates and the collection of plankton samples are common methods to monitor for invasive tunicates species. The determination of an optimal depth range for monitoring can be a time- and cost-effective strategy to increase the probability of species detection (larval supply and recruitment being proxies) given that species pres...
Article
Full-text available
Research and monitoring efforts led to the discovery of four new non-indigenous tunicates and one new non-indigenous anemone in Nova Scotia in 2012 and 2013. In this report, we summarize and interpret the circumstances leading up to and actions taken following the first Nova Scotian records of the high impact invasive tunicate Didemnum vexillum Kot...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Two non-indigenous, colonial, ascidian species, Botryllus schlosseri and Botrylloides violaceus, were discovered along the south coast of Newfoundland in 2006-2007. B. schlosseri was found in several harbours, while B. violaceus has been found in one harbour thus far. These species have been reported in high, invasive abundances in many parts of th...
Thesis
Full-text available
Botryllus schlosseri (Subphylum Tunicata: Class Ascidiacea) is a nonindigenous ascidian species of global and national interest, which has extensive populations along the south coast of insular Newfoundland. Economically, this species has been of concern to industry, management, and policymakers because non-indigenous ascidian species have been a s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ascidian tunicates (sea squirts) can be aggressive invaders that grow over shellfish (e.g., mussels) and consequently out-compete them for space, and perhaps for food. The recent discovery of non-indigenous ascidians in Newfoundland and Labrador warrants the compilation of a comprehensive checklist of ascidian species to provide insight into the di...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Two non-native tunicate species have been identified in the Newfoundland region (violet and golden star tunicates). In the Maritime Provinces tunicates have been impacting the aquaculture industry significantly (especially mussel aquaculture). B. schlosseri has been observed on the east coast of North America since the early 1900’s. Observation of...

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