Kevin Hylton

Kevin Hylton
Leeds Beckett University | LEEDS MET · Centre for Sport and Social Justice

PhD, PGCRM, MA, BA (Hons)

About

53
Publications
22,525
Reads
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1,071
Citations
Citations since 2017
28 Research Items
766 Citations
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Introduction
Kevin Hylton is Head of the Centre for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Leeds Beckett University. Kevin conducts social justice research in Sport, leisure and education and prides himself on working across multiple disciplines. Kevin has recently written Contesting 'Race' and Sport: Shaming the Colour Line.' (Routledge, 2018).
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
January 1998 - June 2016
Leeds Beckett University
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
This paper examines the involvement of members of South Asian communities in cricket (in Bradford and Leeds, UK). The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) identified that despite the high level of interest in cricket within these communities, relatively few were participating in opportunities provided through ECB structures; instead, they were eng...
Article
This article used a critical sampling approach to investigate a series of football forums which respond to and discuss racism and Islamophobia. A thematic analysis of 1,064 forum posts identified 19 themes which led to the construction of five overarching themes which are: i) racism has decreased; ii) denying and downplaying racism and Islamophobia...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last 30 years, Critical Race Theory (CRT) has been applied successfully as an analytical framework, through which, to explore matters of “race,” racialization, and subordination in numerous fields. For CRT to continue to be relevant, there is a need to reorient it as a guiding analytical framework, to account for the ubiquity of digital te...
Article
Rationale: Community sport practitioners often face the dual challenge of creating and sustaining inclusive provision, whilst also aspiring to demonstrate the wider social impacts of their interventions. This enduring challenge has prompted a growing interest in the adoption of “asset-based” approaches as a way to facilitate provision without the r...
Article
Purpose In this invited professional insight paper the author draws parallels between recent debates on racism, Black Lives Matter and related research in sport and cognate domains. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on Critical Race Theory (CRT) the paper contends that 1) sport is a contested site, 2) sport is a microcosm of society 3) “race” an...
Article
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This paper applies the concept “blind spots” to describe partial approaches to “race” and gender equality agendas in sport organizations in the UK, drawing on semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Equality and Coach Development Leaders. Using the specific context of sport coaching, our qualitative approach is underpinned by critical race theory...
Article
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There is a great realization that a professor teaching an introductory or philosophical foundations course in the field of leisure studies comes to, if that professor may not be from the dominant culture of most Western societies. This realization is as stark as their numerical presence in their respective departments. Why are the philosophical fou...
Book
Full-text available
In the decade since Kevin Hylton’s seminal book ‘Race’ and Sport: Critical Race Theory was published, racialised issues have remained at the forefront of sport and leisure studies. In this important new book, Hylton draws on original research in contemporary contexts, from sport coaching to cyberspace, to show once again that Critical Race Theory i...
Article
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In a recent policy debate in this journal, focusing on gender and the events industry, Rhodri Thomas states that his intention in writing the piece was to challenge policy-makers and those working in representative organisations related to events to take equalities more seriously. The aim of this paper is to both react to this call and to make a si...
Article
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This study examines the use of humour by Black football coaches in England as a rhetorical device against racism. The paper draws on humour studies and critical race theory to illustrate signs of humour as defence. Research on humour has popularly explored the ambiguities and qualities of humour and, in particular, joke telling through its use as a...
Article
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The current article provides a critical examination of the racialised and gendered processes that reinforce disparities in sport coaching by exploring the experiences of Black men and women coaches in the United Kingdom. The findings are based on in-depth qualitative interviews with coaches from two national governing bodies of sport. Using a Criti...
Chapter
Die Kategorien »gender«, »race« und »disability« haben im Sport eine besondere Bedeutung. So gibt es vermutlich in keinem anderen Bereich der modernen Gesellschaft eine so selbstverständliche und legitim erscheinende Segregation nach Geschlecht und Behinderung. Eine »color-line« gibt es zwar nicht mehr, aber dennoch gilt die Hautfarbe sowohl im All...
Article
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The article examines how UK sport organizations have framed race equality and diversity, in sport coaching. Semistructured interviews were used to gain insight into organizational perspectives toward 'race', ethnicity, racial equality, and whiteness. Using Critical Race Theory and Black feminism, color-blind practices were found to reinforce a deni...
Article
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Sport may seem like a meritocracy, but scholars debunk, debate, and diagnose the boundaries that keep some on the sidelines, off the air, and out of the game all together.
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The purpose of this paper is to elucidate how racism manifests ‘behind closed doors’ in the backstage private domain. We do this with reference to recent high-profile controversies in the US and UK. In particular, we use the concepts of frontstage (public) and backstage (private) racism to unpack the extraordinary case in point of the ex-National B...
Article
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This section of the journal encourages discussion between several authors on a policy-related topic. The same question may, therefore, be addressed from different theoretical, cultural or spatial perspectives. Dialogues may be applied or highly abstract. This Dialogue starts with this contribution and is followed by three comments by Herman Ouseley...
Article
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Ever since his introduction to the first team at Manchester United FC, Cristiano Ronaldo Dos Santos Aveiro has been recognized as one of the footballing world’s most stand out football players. In turn, Ronaldo has drawn the attention of scholars working across a number of disciplines. While sports economists and sociologists of sport, amongst othe...
Article
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Providing pragmatic interventions (through sport) to tackle social issues in hard-to-reach communities, including those in Aboriginal and black minority ethnic (BME) communities, this study highlights how a community football club was able to deliver positive outcomes for racism, discrimination and health. The article compares findings geographical...
Article
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Background: The universal sport discourses of meritocracy and equality are so engrained that few challenge them. The most cursory interest in sport, Physical Education (PE), and society will reveal that the lived reality is quite different. Racial disparities in the leadership and administration of sport are commonplace worldwide; yet, from researc...
Article
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This paper offers a critique of the much-vaunted claims of sports ability to integrate new migrants by generating social capital. By examining a growing literature base alongside new empirical evidence, we explore whether the experiences of new migrants actually reflect the hypothetical claims made by some policy-makers and scholars about the role...
Article
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At times of economic uncertainty the position of new migrants is subject to ever closer scrutiny. While the main focus of attention tends to be on the world of employment the research on which this paper is based started from the proposition that leisure and sport spaces can support processes of social inclusion yet may also serve to exclude certai...
Article
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The paper addresses the implications of using the process of systematic review in the many areas of leisure where there is a dearth of material that would be admitted into conventional Cochrane Reviews. This raises important questions about what constitutes legitimate knowledge, questions that are of critical import not just to leisure scholars, bu...
Article
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This article examines legacy claims made by a range of agencies and organizations involved in the London 2012 Olympic Development Programme, and specifically the notion that this will inevitably lead to the regeneration of communities. We advocate the application of critical race theory (CRT) to provide an article that argues that ‘race’ matters in...
Article
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Over the last decade there has been a noticeable growth in published works citing Critical Race Theory (CRT). This has led to a growth in interest in the UK of practical research projects utilising CRT as their framework. It is clear that research on ‘race’ is an emerging topic of study. What is less visible is a debate on how CRT is positioned in...
Chapter
Critical Race Theory (CRT) is used in this chapter to frame the analysis of Sport Against Racism Ireland (SARI). Internationally, SARI is not the most high profile anti-racism organisation, but for a small independent organisation it has an impact that outweighs, and may outlive, better funded organisations in this sector. SARI networks span grassr...
Article
Full-text available
As long as racism has been associated with sport there have been consistent, if not coordinated or coherent, struggles to confront its various forms. Critical race theory (CRT) is a framework established to challenge these racialized inequalities and racism in society and has some utility for anti-racism in sport. CRT’s focus on social justice and...
Article
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This paper presents and explores critical race theory (CRT) as an ontological starting point for the study of sport and leisure. CRT is based on five precepts outlined by Solorzano and Yosso that centre 'race' and racism, social justice, plurivocality, transdisciplinarity and challenge orthodoxies. There have been a number of recent criticisms and...
Article
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Apart from millennium concerns about what it means to be English, 'whiteness' has largely escaped examination, particularly in the leisure literature. Where 'black' people have been seen as the significant other in British sport, 'whiteness' could be seen as the 'silent' other. This paper begins to redress this by drawing on the experience of a sui...
Article
Full-text available
A central theme that C-SAP has been exploring in recent years is how ‘race’ and ethnicity are being taught in the social sciences. It has been keen to discover what challenges higher-education institutions face when they attempt to articulate the complex sets of issues around ‘race’ and, importantly, what learning, teaching and assessment innovatio...

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Project (1)
Project
The aim of these endeavors are to revise or rewrite the history of a field (leisure studies). Further, the aim is to encourage others to contribute to this retelling, thus, a "A People's History...."