Kévin Cazelles

Kévin Cazelles
University of Guelph | UOGuelph · Department of Integrative Biology

PhD
Data scientist

About

43
Publications
21,790
Reads
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1,041
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
June 2016 - June 2018
University of Guelph
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2012 - November 2016
Université de Montpellier
Position
  • PhD Student
November 2012 - December 2016
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Larger geographical areas contain more species—an observation raised to a law in ecology. Less explored is whether biodiversity changes are accompanied by a modification of interaction networks. We use data from 32 spatial interaction networks from different ecosystems to analyse how network structure changes with area. We find that basic community...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating the effects of multiple stressors on ecosystems is becoming increasingly vital with global changes. The role of species interactions in propagating the effects of stressors, although widely acknowledged, has yet to be formally explored. Here, we conceptualise how stressors propagate through food webs and explore how they affect simulated...
Preprint
Full-text available
The integration of meta-ecosystem processes over large spatial extent is critical to predicting whether and how global changes might impact biodiversity and ecosystem functions. Yet, there remains an important gap in meta-ecosystem models to predict multiple ecosystem functions (e.g., carbon sequestration, elemental cycling, trophic efficiency) acr...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological networks are increasingly studied at large spatial scales, expanding their focus from a conceptual tool for community ecology into one that also addresses questions in biogeography and macroecology. This effort is supported by increased access to standardized information on ecological networks, in the form of openly accessible databases....
Article
Full-text available
Building the capacity of efficiently determining the provenance of food products represents a crucial step towards the sustainability of the global food system. Despite species specific empirical examples of multi-tracer approaches to provenance, the precise benefit and efficacy of multi-tracers remains poorly understood. Here we show why, and when...
Article
Full-text available
Almost 50 years ago, Michael Rosenzweig pointed out that nutrient addition can destabilise food webs, leading to loss of species and reduced ecosystem function through the paradox of enrichment. Around the same time, David Tilman demonstrated that increased nutrient loading would also be expected to cause competitive exclusion leading to deleteriou...
Preprint
Full-text available
Building the capacity of efficiently determining the provenance of food products represents a crucial step towards the sustainability of the global food system. Whether it is for enforcing existing egislation or providing reliable information to consumers, technologies to verify geographical origin of food are being actively developed. Biological t...
Article
Full-text available
There is a rich amount of information in co‐occurrence (presence–absence) data that could be used to understand community assembly. This proposition first envisioned by Forbes (1907) and then Diamond (1975) prompted the development of numerous modelling approaches (e.g. null model analysis, co‐occurrence networks and, more recently, joint species d...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change continues to diminish ice cover duration for Northern Hemisphere lakes. However, the differential loss of lake ice duration for various types of lakes across the globe is not well established. In this study, we used time series of ice duration data (average length = 51 years) for 220 globally distributed Northern Hemisphere lakes to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Almost 50 years ago, Michael Rosenzweig pointed out that nutrient addition can destabilize food webs, leading to loss of species and reduced ecosystem function through the paradox of enrichment. Around the same time, David Tilman demonstrated that increased nutrient loading would also be expected to cause competitive exclusion leading to deleteriou...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecological networks are increasingly studied at large spatial scales, expanding their focus from a conceptual tool for community ecology into one that also adresses questions in biogeography and macroecology. This effort is supported by increased access to standardized information on ecological networks, in the form of openly accessible databases....
Poster
Full-text available
Global changes are creating intricate stress exposure regimes that induce unpredictable environmental effects permeating entire ecological communities by way of species interactions. The role of species and their interactions in mediating the effects of multiple disturbances on food webs remains understudied. Experimental and in situ approaches pro...
Article
1.Temperate tree species are expected to expand their distribution into the boreal forest in response to climate change. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that many species will experience significant setbacks in capacity to migrate due to a series of unfavourable conditions impacting their recruitment success, and thus their ability to co...
Article
Globally, lake fish communities are being subjected to a range of scale‐dependent anthropogenic pressures, from climate change to eutrophication, and from over‐exploitation to species introductions. As a consequence, the composition of these communities is being reshuffled, in most cases leading to a surge in taxonomic similarity at the regional sc...
Article
Full-text available
The productivity of marine ecosystems and the services they provide to humans are largely dependent on complex interactions between prey and predators. These are embedded in a diverse network of trophic interactions, resulting in a cascade of events following perturbations such as species extinction. The sheer scale of oceans, however, precludes th...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change causes major shifts in species distributions, reshuffling community composition and favouring warm‐adapted species (“thermophilization”). The tree community response is likely to be affected by major disturbances, such as fire and harvest. Here, we quantify the relative contributions of climate change and disturbances to temporal shi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Top predators' responses to environmental conditions are now widely recognized as a key part of understanding how changing food web architecture influences ecosystem structure and stability, ultimately determining the fate of ecosystems with environmental change. Yet the ways that fundamental ecosystem properties like size and complexity impact top...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is asymmetrically altering environmental conditions in space, from local to global scales, creating novel heterogeneity. Here, we argue that this novel heterogeneity will drive mobile generalist consumer species to rapidly respond through their behaviour in ways that broadly and predictably reorganize — or rewire — food webs. We use...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is asymmetrically altering environmental conditions in space, from local to global scales, creating novel heterogeneity. Here, we argue that this novel heterogeneity will drive mobile generalist consumer species to rapidly respond through their behavior in ways that broadly and predictably reorganize—or rewire—food webs. We use exist...
Article
Full-text available
The article introduces rcites, an R client to access to the Speciesplus database. rcites provides functions to 1. access the Speciesplus taxon concept, and thereafter 2. get a species' legislation status, both from CITES and from the European Union, 3. get a species' country-wise distribution range, as listed in Speciesplus, and 4. get the referenc...
Article
For effective monitoring in social‐ecological systems to meet needs for biodiversity, science, and humans, desired outcomes must be clearly defined and routes from direct to derived outcomes understood. The Arctic is undergoing rapid climatic, ecological, social, and economic changes and requires effective wildlife monitoring to meet diverse stakeh...
Article
Species-area relationships (SARs) are pivotal to understand the distribution of biodiversity across spatial scales. We know little, however, about how the network of biotic interactions in which biodiversity is embedded changes with spatial extent. Here we develop a new theoretical framework that enables us to explore how different assembly mechani...
Article
Full-text available
Species richness is regulated by a complex network of scale-dependent processes. This complexity can obscure the influence of limiting species interactions, making it difficult to determine if abiotic or biotic drivers are more predominant regulators of richness. Using integrative modeling of freshwater fish richness from 721 lakes along an 11olati...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists, policy makers, and journalists are three key, interconnected players involved in prioritizing and implementing solutions to mitigate the consequences of anthropogenic pressures on the environment. The way in which information is framed and expertise is communicated by the media is crucial for political decisions and for the integrated m...
Poster
Full-text available
Exhaustively describing the complex nature of ecological interaction networks is a challenging task even under ideal conditions. When confronted with data-poor environments and large scales of analyses, the task becomes even more daunting. Network-level descriptors are thus largely ignored for practical applications, even though we recognize the im...
Article
Communities consist of species and their interactions. They can thus be described as networks, with species as nodes and interactions as links. Within such networks, the diversity of nodes and the distribution of links may affect patterns of energy transfer between trophic levels, the dynamics of the system, and the outcome in terms of ecosystem fu...
Article
Full-text available
To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the ha...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since the mid-20th century, climate change and biodiversity loss have been identified as major consequences of anthropological pressures and both have already transgressed safe limits. Given their significance for human health and well-being and their large-scale effects, international cooperation is crucial to address these issues. Intergovernment...
Article
Full-text available
The study of species co-occurrences has been central in community ecology since the foundation of the discipline. Co-occurrence data are, nevertheless, a neglected source of information to model species distributions and biogeographers are still debating about the impact of biotic interactions on species distributions across geographical scales. We...
Article
Full-text available
Biogeography is primarily concerned with the spatial distribution of biodiversity, including performing scenarios in a changing environment. The efforts deployed to develop species distribution models have resulted in predictive tools, but have mostly remained correlative and have largely ignored biotic interactions. Here we build upon the theory o...
Article
1.There is a growing realization among community ecologists that interactions between species vary across space and time, and that this variation needs be quantified. Our current numerical framework to analyze the structure of species interactions, based on graph-theoretical approaches, usually do not consider the variability of interactions. Since...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. There is a growing realization among community ecologists that interactions between species vary in space and time. Yet, our current numerical framework to analyze the structure of interactions, largely based on graph-theoretical approaches, is unsuited to this type of data. Since the variation of species interactions holds much information, the...
Article
The effects of fire on the vegetation vary across continents. However, in Neotropical fire-prone grasslands, the relationship between fire and seed germination is still poorly understood, while their regeneration, especially after strong anthropogenic disturbance, is challenging for their conservation. In the present study, we assessed diversity of...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide and a major public health problem in tropical areas. The increasing case burden is associated with an expanding geographic range and increasing intensity of transmission in affected areas. Knowledge of spatial and temporal patterns in dengue transmission at a sub-national level is...
Article
Full-text available
Wavelet analysis is now frequently used to extract information from ecological and epidemiological time series. Statistical hypothesis tests are conducted on associated wavelet quantities to assess the likelihood that they are due to a random process. Such random processes represent null models and are generally based on synthetic data that share s...
Article
The role of fungi in soil ecosystem sustainability is poorly understood, as is the extent to which it is affected by the microscale heterogeneity of soils with respect to structure, chemistry and biology. This is due to the complexity of soil ecosystems, presenting significant challenges to their study in situ. Many theoretical and simulation model...

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